#1
Hey, I've got a few questions about theory in general.
I know a few scales but I find it hard knowing how to apply theory. For example
1) How do I know which chords go with which scales and vice versa?
2) If for example I was writing a song in E minor, would all riffs in the song have to be in the E minor pentatonic scale and would they need to be in the same scale all the way through?
3) I have a riff with root notes E,D,F and there are no scales that match all three of these chords (according to a website I use), what scale(s) would I be able to use for this?
4) Does the type of chord matter in a song? For example, If I wrote a song with a riff that has root notes of E,D,F would it work if I used a mixture of minor, major and diminished chords? If so what type of scale would I use? Major minor or diminished?

I know that musical theory isn't everything, and that music should be about making something that sounds good which is what I do usually (hence my lack of knowledge in applying theory), but I would really like to know some of these things as I think it will really benefit my song writing.
#2
David, im kinda in the same situation you are in, but i'll try and help you out here. I learned alot of my theory through different sites online, and through a few guitar books that i bought. so in regards to your questions, 1)2)and 3), i'll do my best to help ya out.
1)If you are playing a major scale, the chords 1-7 would look like this:
1-Major 2-minor 3-minor 4-Major 5-Major 6-minor 7-diminshed

IF you are playing minor scales, the chord pattern would look like this:

1-Major 2-diminshed 3-flattened minor 4-minor 5-minor 6-flat Major 7-flat Major

hope that helps

2)The riff doesn't have to be in Emin only, use the relative Maj=Min as in the sense that Emin is the same as Gmaj, and then from the Gmaj scale you can explore all the different scales and modes. for example the E melodic minor, and i say this because the Eminor scale is the descending part of it.

So E Melodic Minor looks something like this:

Ascending Descending
E F# G A B C# D# E F# G A B C D

hope that helps

3)DEF appear in the A phrygian mode, they also appear in the Bmin Blues Scale, and a few more too.

4) what site do you use for the theory part. i suggest lookin over the lessons section on this site as there is lots of good information
INCOMING

Bleed Black Label

RIP Dimebag Darrell
#3
Quote by WarlockSlinger
David, im kinda in the same situation you are in, but i'll try and help you out here. I learned alot of my theory through different sites online, and through a few guitar books that i bought. so in regards to your questions, 1)2)and 3), i'll do my best to help ya out.
1)If you are playing a major scale, the chords 1-7 would look like this:
1-Major 2-minor 3-minor 4-Major 5-Major 6-minor 7-diminshed

IF you are playing minor scales, the chord pattern would look like this:

1-Major 2-diminshed 3-flattened minor 4-minor 5-minor 6-flat Major 7-flat Major

hope that helps

2)The riff doesn't have to be in Emin only, use the relative Maj=Min as in the sense that Emin is the same as Gmaj, and then from the Gmaj scale you can explore all the different scales and modes. for example the E melodic minor, and i say this because the Eminor scale is the descending part of it.

So E Melodic Minor looks something like this:

Ascending Descending
E F# G A B C# D# E F# G A B C D

hope that helps

3)DEF appear in the A phrygian mode, they also appear in the Bmin Blues Scale, and a few more too.

4) what site do you use for the theory part. i suggest lookin over the lessons section on this site as there is lots of good information


http://jguitar.com/harmonizer/chord2scale?chordRoot=F&chordlist=E&chordlist=D&chordlist=F&chord=

That is the website, I just put the chords (E major, D major, F major) in there and it says that only E major and D major work on the A Ionian. Also, 2 notes of my riff aren't on that scale.

Also, I don't understand what you put in the first part. Does that mean that if I have 3 chords for example, they have to be in the same order as that sort of thing. So it could be 1,2,3 or 2,3,4 but it couldn't be 1,3,4? I don't really understand that so if I'm wrong I'd appreciate it if you simplified what you were trying to say.

Also, did you mean Emin is the same as Dmaj? and does that mean that they are the exact same scale?

I really don't understand this at all All of these websites do teach you a lot of scales and stuff but they never teach you what things like this mean. I don't even know what you mean by the
"Ascending Descending
E F# G A B C# D# E F# G A B C D"

I fail
#4
Also, did you mean Emin is the same as Dmaj? and does that mean that they are the exact same scale?


E min is the relative minor of G maj. They contain all the same notes but have different tonal centres.


That is the website, I just put the chords (E major, D major, F major) in there and it says that only E major and D major work on the A Ionian. Also, 2 notes of my riff aren't on that scale.


there's not a scale (or at least a commonly used one) that all those notes fit into, but don't worry about that. Notes that are used but don't fit into the scale being used are accidentals and you can use them whenever you think they sound good. But i think E dominant phrygian (E F G# A B C D) would sound good played over that progression. Try not to use Fs when playing over the D maj chord though because they clash with the F# in the chord.

Also, I don't understand what you put in the first part. Does that mean that if I have 3 chords for example, they have to be in the same order as that sort of thing. So it could be 1,2,3 or 2,3,4 but it couldn't be 1,3,4? I don't really understand that so if I'm wrong I'd appreciate it if you simplified what you were trying to say.


what he said in his post is what chords can be played over what scale. It has nothing to do with the order. eg. the chord starting on the first scale degree of a major scale is major, the second is minor, third minor etc.etc.
#5
Quote by Eirien
E min is the relative minor of G maj. They contain all the same notes but have different tonal centres.


there's not a scale (or at least a commonly used one) that all those notes fit into, but don't worry about that. Notes that are used but don't fit into the scale being used are accidentals and you can use them whenever you think they sound good. But i think E dominant phrygian (E F G# A B C D) would sound good played over that progression. Try not to use Fs when playing over the D maj chord though because they clash with the F# in the chord.


what he said in his post is what chords can be played over what scale. It has nothing to do with the order. eg. the chord starting on the first scale degree of a major scale is major, the second is minor, third minor etc.etc.


Ahh, I don't know about any of this first scale degree stuff :S
#6
your best bet is to go to the lessons section of this site....it will solve all your problems
INCOMING

Bleed Black Label

RIP Dimebag Darrell
#8
Quote by Jaz969
That's a really cool website! Bookedmarked! Thanks!


No problem, btw I'm so jealous of where you live, you should realise why

Anyway, sorry to bring this back from the dead but I still want to know something. Take Canon rock in D for an example. This song is in the key of D, so does that mean I can play any scale in D, or am I limited to certain ones?
#10
Read the sticky.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.