#1
So I was thinking about getting a new amp, and a store close to me runs a nice discount on these, including the 112 version and the head.

Anything you'd recommend, or something I should steer clear of? Also, in the event that I am going to get one, would the 212 combo or a head be better, longterm? Actually, I'm quite a noob when it comes to stuff like this, what is the actual advantage of having a head instead of a combo, expect for that you can bring your head with you to mount on other cabs different places?
#2
The combo will be fine.. if anything you can change the tubes and speakers later on.

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#3
Quote by stradivari310
The combo will be fine.. if anything you can change the tubes and speakers later on.


Yes, but what is the main difference between a combo and a head+cab? Is it the sound, it or it only the mobility of the head?

EDIT: They also run a pretty high discount on a cab for the head.
#4
get a combo 1x12 should be enough for practice and gigging. you can always get an extention cab like i did
#5
Quote by Toolshed#9
Yes, but what is the main difference between a combo and a head+cab? Is it the sound, it or it only the mobility of the head?

EDIT: They also run a pretty high discount on a cab for the head.

Basically the main difference is bass response, and I guess volume to some degree. You will get better bass response from a cab, although they are seriously annoying to transport.

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#6
Quote by Toolshed#9
Yes, but what is the main difference between a combo and a head+cab? Is it the sound, it or it only the mobility of the head?

The head will give you more options as far as cab/speaker configuration, that's about it. Combo's are generally much less expensive than a head/cab setup.
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#7
Quote by Toolshed#9
Yes, but what is the main difference between a combo and a head+cab? Is it the sound, it or it only the mobility of the head?

EDIT: They also run a pretty high discount on a cab for the head.

Cabs have a "fuller" sound because the extra speakers distribute the sound differently than one speaker. There's no performance difference though. Combo's are much better in my opinion because they're portable.
#8
Youll need the 212 if you want to band practise/gig, theyre not as loud as people say.

The 212 is better in general anyway.
The difference between the 212 and head is how the sound travels basically, the way I understand it is the head with cab is a bigger sound.
They're both 'the same volume', but a head with cab is more likely to give you hearing damage basically, in a good way

But yeah, I've got the 212 and I'm pretty happy with it, I mean it's no mesa, but it does the job. I sometimes feel the overdrive is pretty...ugly though, but I've still properly to use my Mxr EQ with it, and change tubes and whatever.

But yeah, I'd say go with it. Unless you go used I can't think of anything as decent in its range.
#9
id say go with the head, in mine and other's experiences it sounds better, has a little bit higher gain and its easier to just throw any cab under it to improve the sound. I run mine through a 2x12 with vintage 30s and the sound is muchhhh better then with the stock cab
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I want an amp good for playing hippie tunes. I want it to be an actual amp, not a tube amp.
#10
Quote by sdmf.1919
Youll need the 212 if you want to band practise/gig, theyre not as loud as people say.


I definitely disagree. You could easily gig with the 50W 112 version, IMHO. That's the one I'd recommend.

If you're thinking about the 100W 212 model, then the head and a cab would be the better option. Peavey is not known for great speakers, even in their higher end models. You'll be able to put together a much better amp by getting a different cab. Even something like an Avatar with a pair of V30's would be a big improvement.

See but then... if you're spending as much as you would on the 212 or head & cab, you'd probably be better off going with a different amp entirely. At least I would.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
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#11
Quote by slatsmania
I definitely disagree. You could easily gig with the 50W 112 version, IMHO. That's the one I'd recommend.

If you're thinking about the 100W 212 model, then the head and a cab would be the better option. Peavey is not known for great speakers, even in their higher end models. You'll be able to put together a much better amp by getting a different cab. Even something like an Avatar with a pair of V30's would be a big improvement.

See but then... if you're spending as much as you would on the 212 or head & cab, you'd probably be better off going with a different amp entirely. At least I would.


The 212 combo is pretty cheap, I think (remember the discount)? Like what other different types of amps for that price?
#12
With the larger amp, you have more to replace to get it up to speed; two speakers, four power tubes. I definitely think the 100W amp is overkill.

In the same price range, I'd much rather have the Peavey Classic 30/50 or Delta Blues, the Palomino v32/50, or the Traynor YCV 40/50. If you're into heavier music, the B-52 and Randall are both worth looking into as well.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#13
Alot of people forget most people are gigging with a drummer.

An average drum set is 115 db or higher sometimes up to 145db
Now your average guitar amp at full volume is 110 db. If the speaker impedance is eight ohms, and if the amplifier will deliver 50 watts, we can calculate a maximum output level of 106dBSPL at one metre. 64W of tube power is required to generate 118dB. These are all averages and so on.

Now take into account the drummer is at 115db and your avberage 50 watt amp can generate 106db. The odds are he will not be able to get louder then the drummer so he would get drowned out. A bigger amp is really needed for gigging and practice. Sure he can mic the amp but what about at practice and also more then likely your drummer is gonna be miced up at a gig as well and then the fight in-sues to see who is louder then who.

Just get the bigger amp you wont regret it...
#14
All I can say, professor, is that I've never had trouble gigging with a drummer and another guitar with a 30W amp. Never had to dial it even halfway up volume-wise, either.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#15
Quote by slatsmania
All I can say, professor, is that I've never had trouble gigging with a drummer and another guitar with a 30W amp. Never had to dial it even halfway up volume-wise, either.


That was all averages example is drummer giving it 100% and amp giving it 100% mainly in a Metal Scenario. Light rock, classic rock and blues you could probally get away with it if your drummer has a light touch and is playing off the volume of your amp. But if your going full bore then the drums with kill a guitar rig... But then again what happens if your in a very loud environment like a bar? You both might need to go 100% so the guy in the back of the club playing pool can even hear the drums and then what happens to the guitarist...

Just saying bigger is going to benefit him more then guessing if he can pull it off with something smaller.
#16
It's true I'm not playing metal, but I'm thinking that if you're cranking a 100W amp in a bar, the guy in the back by the pool table can't even hear himself think.

Your numbers on the volume of the drum set don't get into the frequencies from the guitar and the drums, and the nature of each instrument. The drum kit is loudest when the drummer hits his snare, which is (simply put) two pops a measure. Otherwise, there's a lot of empty space in the sound of a drum kit.

Guitar is a mid-frequency instrument. The frequencies that the human ear picks up best. The guitar is also playing much more steadily. Yeah, that snare should be louder than the guitar when it pops, but for the most part a 30W tube amp is cutting thru that mix qite nicely.

Also, it's not like a 100W amp is twice as loud as a 50W amp, etc. The reality is that 100W is only twice as loud as a 10W amp. People gig with amps as small as 15W (yes, with a drummer). I don't because I like cleans cutting thru the mix - which I can achieve comfortably with 30W.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#17
I gigged with a rather silly drummer who had no control over his dynamics (always full-bore) with my Fender Pro Jr. 15 watts. 10" speaker. I couldn't even crank it high enough to get all the tube saturation I wanted.

50 Watts is FINE.
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#19
I still dont get why most people on here suggest the smallest thing they can get by with. Most people that ask this question are stating for longterm use, should i get this or what should i get and everyone points them to the smallest amp they can get by with. Why take the risk or chance it. What if the dude gets a gig that doesnt have a pa system in a decently sized bar and the drummer is loud and other guitarist has a 2x12 100 watt combo or halfstack? I know a guy that has this exact issue and he plays classic rock. The guy always has to mic up and fight with his sound for 20 minutes.

If the guy said hey im looking for a small amp to practice in my bedroom then cool. But if someone says in the long run whats my best option and has mentioned getting a head. Then i dont think th go with a 1 x 12 option is his best bet. And ive done plenty of sound checks for guys i know with 1 x 12 combos and other setups and they always have to mic it in a decent sized bar..... Half the time i hear the bassists rig over everything and he is the one not mic'ed lol
Last edited by IbanezPsycho at Feb 12, 2008,
#21
Quote by IbanezPsycho
I still dont get why most people on here suggest the smallest thing they can get by with.


I don't want to do that. What I want to do is recommend the right sized amp for the user's needs.

Now, in the scenario that you suggest (which reads to me like a collection of near-deaf lunatics but I know they're out there!) - you know what? Yeah, a 100W halfstack is probably in order.

But in my humble experience, if you're playing anything other than metal (classic, indie, blues) in clubs and bars, a much smaller amp isn't only fine, it's better. If I played out with a 100W amp, I'd never get it near it's sweet spot. I have a tough enough time trying to get my AC30 there without pissing off my drummer. If you're looking to get some power tube OD in a club, 30W is about as big as you'd want to get. Smaller than that might be even better if you're not looking for any cleans at all.

Clearly, this is all very subjective. That's why it's up to the individual player to figure out what he wants from his amp based on what he plays and where he plans to play it.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#22
Quote by Hardrock_tm
I got a 212 for xmas and I love it. Its worth buying, but you might want a distortion/overdrive pedal

I have the 212 too it gets louder than you should probably ever need, I thought the lead channel was pretty nice, I have a sd-2 but it makes it feedback too much and I think it sounds better without it anyways it might be the pedal because I get it used cheap. I usually just use a ns-2 noise suppresor in the front and I'm happy with all the sounds I can get from it. buy it
#23
Quote by slatsmania
I don't want to do that. What I want to do is recommend the right sized amp for the user's needs.

Now, in the scenario that you suggest (which reads to me like a collection of near-deaf lunatics but I know they're out there!) - you know what? Yeah, a 100W halfstack is probably in order.

But in my humble experience, if you're playing anything other than metal (classic, indie, blues) in clubs and bars, a much smaller amp isn't only fine, it's better. If I played out with a 100W amp, I'd never get it near it's sweet spot. I have a tough enough time trying to get my AC30 there without pissing off my drummer. If you're looking to get some power tube OD in a club, 30W is about as big as you'd want to get. Smaller than that might be even better if you're not looking for any cleans at all.

Clearly, this is all very subjective. That's why it's up to the individual player to figure out what he wants from his amp based on what he plays and where he plans to play it.


Ehh ill go with that... Plus the poster needs to post his needs. Thats why i was going on averages and worse case scenarios... But ill aggree with everything you just said..

And to clarify im a metal guy lol and probally your most hated enemy.. I own 100w amp running through a half stack for bedroom use Ohh and im one of those deaf lunatics......
#24
Quote by IbanezPsycho
And to clarify im a metal guy lol and probally your most hated enemy.. I own 100w amp running through a half stack for bedroom use Ohh and im one of those deaf lunatics......


No man, not at all. I'm an older guy (ancient by UG standards), but back in the day I was playing Judas Priest, Motorhead, Black Sabbath, etc., in my own metal band. I had an Ibanez Destroyer, and still have an Ibanez Flying V.

It's all good.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#25
Quote by slatsmania
No man, not at all. I'm an older guy (ancient by UG standards), but back in the day I was playing Judas Priest, Motorhead, Black Sabbath, etc., in my own metal band. I had an Ibanez Destroyer, and still have an Ibanez Flying V.

It's all good.



Ahh a previously deaf lunatic that has reformed his ways... Rock on brotha!