#1
i dont no if this is the right thred but can using a bow on ur guitar snap the strings
(\__/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination.
part of Trumpet Player's Alliance
Pimus sucks group
80s rock group
Quote by frozen_soul
ummm testicular cancer?
#2
jimmy page used one in dazed and confused, it will destroy the bow pretty quickly though

it sounds awesome though
Quote by metul kult
You know when Attack Attack is ripping off your music, you're onto something


twitter: @victorstaygold
#4
yeh your violin bow will torn to shreds but your guitar strings will be fine. If you are looking into doing this with a violin bow I recommend when buying one to ask if they have any defected ones or 'bargin' ones because they are quite expensive (60-100+)
#5
Doesn't the guitarist from Sigur Ros use a bow? Is it specially made or does he just shred through them?
#7
Quote by Valetar
yeh your violin bow will torn to shreds but your guitar strings will be fine. If you are looking into doing this with a violin bow I recommend when buying one to ask if they have any defected ones or 'bargin' ones because they are quite expensive (60-100+)


Shouldnt flatwounds be fine on your strings, as they are very similar to violin strings?
#11
Quote by heaven's gate
Just don't put rosin on the bow; I heard it wrecks the pickups


The rosin shouldnt be touching the pickups....

It will add a layer to the strings, but that should not affect their sound (or atleast it doesnt on a violin).
#12
Quote by Leafs_fan_37
Doesn't the guitarist from Sigur Ros use a bow? Is it specially made or does he just shred through them?


He uses a cello bow, which are a bit bigger and somewhat more durable.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#13
Quote by isaac_bandits
The rosin shouldnt be touching the pickups....

It will add a layer to the strings, but that should not affect their sound (or atleast it doesnt on a violin).

When I play my viola, the rosin dust does end up on the instrument under the strings. This would happen on the Guitar also. Most of the rosin ends up on the strings but enough would drift and settle to mess up the pickups.

The hair of the bow does wear weather it's a violin or Guitar, it's just a question of how long you need it to last. Without using rosin, you have to press harder and play a lot more agressivly, thats why the bow seems to shred faster.

One factor might be that violin / viola strings are single strand, not wound. So if it's a high grade bow with fine horse hair, it might have issues with the three lower strings. But a courser synthetic bow won't inherantly damage the guitar, or vice versa.
#14
Quote by justpucky
When I play my viola, the rosin dust does end up on the instrument under the strings. This would happen on the Guitar also. Most of the rosin ends up on the strings but enough would drift and settle to mess up the pickups.

The hair of the bow does wear weather it's a violin or Guitar, it's just a question of how long you need it to last. Without using rosin, you have to press harder and play a lot more agressivly, thats why the bow seems to shred faster.

One factor might be that violin / viola strings are single strand, not wound. So if it's a high grade bow with fine horse hair, it might have issues with the three lower strings. But a courser synthetic bow won't inherantly damage the guitar, or vice versa.


OK. I stand corrected about that then.

However, I know that upright bass strings are flatwound. Therefore using a bow from a bass on a guitar, would probably be your best bet, as if played properly, then the guitar would damage the bow no more than a bass would.
#15
Quote by isaac_bandits
OK. I stand corrected about that then.

However, I know that upright bass strings are flatwound. Therefore using a bow from a bass on a guitar, would probably be your best bet, as if played properly, then the guitar would damage the bow no more than a bass would.

I'm pretty sure flatwound strings and violin/viola strings have the same surface (ie violin strings appear to be flatwound). Either way, most (if not all) bows are made of horse hair, despite the instrument.
#16
Quote by heaven's gate
I'm pretty sure flatwound strings and violin/viola strings have the same surface (ie violin strings appear to be flatwound). Either way, most (if not all) bows are made of horse hair, despite the instrument.


I thought violins (and most likely viola's too) had flatwound strings. I am fairly certain that when i looked at my sister's violin, that it did infact have windings (however nearly unnoticable). I said the bass bow might be better, because it should be somewhat sturdier than a violin bow, despite being made of the same material. I, however, am certain that upright basses do have flatwound strings.
#17
Something that might work out better for you is the bow from an instrument called a "ukelin" (or, as wikipedia calls it, a "Bowed Psaltery"). They were basically fad instruments made during the 30s and 40s, and as such there's tons of them floating around with no real value.

The bow, instead of using horse hairs, just uses this cloth strip, and would probably be more durable and better suited to your uses.
Do YOU know who Les Paul is?

Guitars:
-Epiphone Dot Studio
Amps:
-Fender Stage 112 SE
Effects:
-BBE Soul Vibe
-Boss OD-1 Overdrive
-Ibanez DE-7 Delay
#18
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
He uses a cello bow, which are a bit bigger and somewhat more durable.


just a small lenght difference, which makes it more easier to break it

but as long as you don't torture the bow, it would be fine, at the end of the day, they aren't so expensive