#1
Incubus uses these chords quite often and I'm interested in the theory behind them. Seems like fourths with a stacked octave fourth on top. Sounds great though.

E----------------------------
B----------------------------
G---------------------7-----
D---------------------7-----
A---------------------5-----
E---------------------5-----
#2
It's just a powerchord with the fifth in the bass.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by Mekchrious
D5/A to be exact, what Avis said, a powerchord(DAD)with an A base(ADAD)


Alternatively one could think of it as A4.
#6
Quote by isaac_bandits
Alternatively one could think of it as A4.


True, but it would really depend on the context. Alone, I think D would assert itself as the root.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
True, but it would really depend on the context. Alone, I think D would assert itself as the root.


Yes. D probably would.
#9
It is a D5/A.
You can't have a sus4 chord without a 5th.
Unless you called it Asus4(no5th).
Which it doesn't function as anyway.
So the answer is D5/A.
And they sound great with distortion.
Gore AND Core; unite!
#10
Quote by Daisy_Ramirez_
It is a D5/A.
You can't have a sus4 chord without a 5th.
Unless you called it Asus4(no5th).
Which it doesn't function as anyway.
So the answer is D5/A.
And they sound great with distortion.


But i wasnt calling it a sus4 chord. Hell, I wasnt even calling it a chord. It is a dyad consisting of A and D, which may be thought of as D5/A, or as A4. Either of these are correct. 5 refers to a dyad which contains just the root and the fifth (perfect unless otherwise stated). 4 refers to a dyad which contains just the root and the fourth (perfect unless otherwise stated).

However, D will sound as a root more clearly than A would despite A being the bass note. The reason behind this is that the first harmonic of D's harmonic series is A, which makes A very consonant ontop of a D note. However, none of A's harmonic series containst D (or atleast not within the first eight notes of it), and therefore A sounds weaker than D, when they are played simultaneously, due to A making the D stronger, but D not making the A stronger.
#11
True, when placed as an A chord, you would be looking at an A4 chord. I use the word chord loosely, as it really isn't a chord. And yes, the chord sounds awesome.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
But i wasnt calling it a sus4 chord. Hell, I wasnt even calling it a chord. It is a dyad consisting of A and D, which may be thought of as D5/A, or as A4. Either of these are correct. 5 refers to a dyad which contains just the root and the fifth (perfect unless otherwise stated). 4 refers to a dyad which contains just the root and the fourth (perfect unless otherwise stated).

However, D will sound as a root more clearly than A would despite A being the bass note. The reason behind this is that the first harmonic of D's harmonic series is A, which makes A very consonant ontop of a D note. However, none of A's harmonic series containst D (or atleast not within the first eight notes of it), and therefore A sounds weaker than D, when they are played simultaneously, due to A making the D stronger, but D not making the A stronger.


True.
My points that "A4" is wrong. It would be "Asus4(no5th)".
Also, if you want to get into harmonic strength, the reason it would be D5/A, is because the strongest harmonic note of ANY note is it's fifth.
It's so evident, ESPECIALLY with distortion, that you don't even need to put the fifth in chords.
Hence, if you do, it's by far the strongest note after the root.

It just so happens that this chord is D5/A, and *CAN'T* be "A4", for the points above.
Gore AND Core; unite!
#13
Quote by Daisy_Ramirez_
True.
My points that "A4" is wrong. It would be "Asus4(no5th)".
Also, if you want to get into harmonic strength, the reason it would be D5/A, is because the strongest harmonic note of ANY note is it's fifth.
It's so evident, ESPECIALLY with distortion, that you don't even need to put the fifth in chords.
Hence, if you do, it's by far the strongest note after the root.

It just so happens that this chord is D5/A, and *CAN'T* be "A4", for the points above.


If the D resolves to a C# then it would be an Asus4, but I'm guessing it won't, so you're right.
#14
Quote by Daisy_Ramirez_
True.
My points that "A4" is wrong. It would be "Asus4(no5th)".
Also, if you want to get into harmonic strength, the reason it would be D5/A, is because the strongest harmonic note of ANY note is it's fifth.
It's so evident, ESPECIALLY with distortion, that you don't even need to put the fifth in chords.
Hence, if you do, it's by far the strongest note after the root.

It just so happens that this chord is D5/A, and *CAN'T* be "A4", for the points above.



Yes I know that the fifth is the strongest harmonic note, due to a fifth being the second, fifth, and eigth overtones of any note. Only the octave is a stronger overtone (first, third, and sixth overtones), but since the octave is the root note, it does not qulaify.

Secondly A4 does not need to be Asus4(no5). That would be like saying A5 should be A(no3). Neither A4, nor A5 are chords, as they only contain two notes, thus not meeting the basic criteria of a chord, which is it must contain at least three notes. Therefore A4 is referring to a dyad, rather than a chord, hence why calling it A, with an added 4 (which is D) makes sense, which gives us the name A4.