#1
Ok so Wet Sand by RHCP starts off with just a 1 5 6 3 progression in G. Then what i don't understand is in the chorus it goes to an E and a C and i was wondering where the E would come from. Also at the end of the song I'm thinking it just kinda does a chromatic thing from E to F# to G#m but I'm not real sure, there's also an Eb played once at the end and I don't know where any of that would come from. And after all of this what key would the solo be in? Would it just be G?
Last edited by jimmyslashpage at Feb 12, 2008,
#2
The E is a borrowed chord from the parallel minor scale. E is not in G major, but it is in G minor.

What chords is the solo played over?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
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#3
edit: meh last post before I went to bed.

I agree with the people below me.
Last edited by capiCrimm at Feb 13, 2008,
#4
Am I missing something? I'm pretty sure there's no E in G minor and E isn't the forth of G.
#5
Quote by Ænimus Prime
The E is a borrowed chord from the parallel minor scale. E is not in G major, but it is in G minor.

What chords is the solo played over?


Eb is in G minor, not E

Now, G is the III of E minor, so you could look at the G as a chord borrowed in advance. If the chord sheet I'm looking at is correct, it goes Em, G, D, THEN E, so D is the (b)VII and G is the III.

The C is then the bVI of E, which is mode mixture, like Aenimus said.

The E F# G#m is a VI VII i in G#m. Another writer might have made the G# chord major, and it still would sound good, but this one has G#m so it's pretty easy to see how all these chords fit in a key.

As far as I can tell, the Eb in the guitar part is played over an E, and is therefore a D#. Not surprising, since the E in this progression is a major 7th chord when you extend it.
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#6
Goddamn it. I hate it when I do that. Reverse what I said and you get 'G is not in E major, but it is in G minor'. Anyways, thats not what the question is asking.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums