#1
http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html


im trying to learn theory and the interval part makes 0 sense to me i get the steps and what w and h is but this is hard to understand i need to learn this because i want to start making my own music since im starting a band

this just seems overwhelming

idk where to start with scales and with theory and what i should be practicing after playing for 2 years theres just so much i should be learning or already know
Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Blackstar HT-5 Head
Homemade 1x12 from a combo cab with an Eminence PJ
Quote by ikey_
perhaps i have a superb epiphone. the japanese man must have gotten laid and won the lottery right before he made my guitar. whatever.
#2
I'm not really sure where to start. Perhaps you can be more specific about what you don't understand?
#3
You don't really need to know why they work although it does greatly help. Just learn your Major and relative minor and from there you have command over most of the fretboard in that key.
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#4
basically what im trying to say im a complete n00b to theory and dont know what to start on

i wanna shred like kirk and want it to sound good
Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Blackstar HT-5 Head
Homemade 1x12 from a combo cab with an Eminence PJ
Quote by ikey_
perhaps i have a superb epiphone. the japanese man must have gotten laid and won the lottery right before he made my guitar. whatever.
#5
^ well lets conquer the easy part first

W = whole step

such as

E--0--2--

the distance between an open E and the E on the 2nd fret (F#)
this could also be represented as

E--2--4--
or
E--4--6--
or
E--8--10--

all of these are whole step movements, or whole step intervals

H = half step interval

such as

E--0--1--

the distance between an open E string and then E string on the first fret (F)

also such as

E--2--3--
or
E--4--5--
or
E--8--9

just as examples.

the example of WWHWWWH for a major scale is easy when you look at it in tab form like this, i suggest once you start getting used to it to actually start thinking of it in terms of notes but in the beginning it might be easier to look at it in tab form (im sure some mod might come in here and say "no you should learn the notes first", in fact most the guys in here will prolly say that but im just lookin to get you started

ok lets dissect it

E major on the low E string is this


E--0--2--4--5--7--9--11--12---
     W  W  H  W W  W   H
#6
Quote by Amerikhastan
First of all, Kirk doesn't shred. Second of all he's strictly pentatonic so if theory is too much for you and you want to sound like Kirk just learn the pentatonic scale.

Aside from the mildly useful tidbit, what compelled you to post this?
#7
amerikhastan you obviously dont know your solos, he's definately not strictly pentatonic. and imo he shreds, maybe not paul gilbert shreds but i'd say his solos are pretty technical and you'd need a decent amount of proficiency at the guitar to play them
#8
All you should worry about is the major and minor for now like Mettlicaa said, most of the other stuff is pretty much optional and once you figure it out it clicks in easily.
#9
Quote by Amerikhastan
First of all, Kirk doesn't shred. Second of all he's strictly pentatonic so if theory is too much for you and you want to sound like Kirk just learn the pentatonic scale.



Dick...


anyways i can see it easier with the tab that helps alot

but in the beginning of that post he was talking about intervals i didnt get that at all
Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Blackstar HT-5 Head
Homemade 1x12 from a combo cab with an Eminence PJ
Quote by ikey_
perhaps i have a superb epiphone. the japanese man must have gotten laid and won the lottery right before he made my guitar. whatever.
#10
an interval is simply the distance between 2 notes, there are a total of 12 intervals. as an example in the article, the distance from C to the F above it is a perfect 4. this can be applied to any note depending on the key. another example would be

the distance between E and the A above it is also a perfect fourth. if you count the steps between C and the F above it AND E and the A above it you'll notice there is the same distance between those 2 groups of notes.
#11
ok i see what ur saying i think pretty much if i wanted to play

C then F

then wanted to play

E

i would have to go to A

so it would sound right i think thats what ur saying :/
Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Blackstar HT-5 Head
Homemade 1x12 from a combo cab with an Eminence PJ
Quote by ikey_
perhaps i have a superb epiphone. the japanese man must have gotten laid and won the lottery right before he made my guitar. whatever.
#12
^ yeah i think you're getting that right, like if you hit a C then the F above it, that would be a perfect fourth. just like if you hit an E then played the A above it, that would be a perfect fourth as well. intervals are like a form of measurement for finding the distance between notes.

edit: i can't really think of a much simpler way to put it unfortunately, maybe some of the better teachers in the forums will throw their 2 cents in to see if they can get it to click with you.
#13
It took me a while to grasp very basic things.. like chord naming, just keep thinking about it and reading it over ! It'll click, and once one thing clicks its much easier to learn everything.