#1
Alright, I own a Chrome Red Fat Stratocaster and I was getting a wicked painting on the pickguard of a phoenix and some stuff, but after the artist started we realized that it's not going to work with acrylics, so what do you suggest?

Once again, I'm not just painting it one color, I'm getting a custom painting done on my pickguard. I really want it to stay for as long as possible so what do you recommend I do?
#2
I would not recommend latex-based paints, especially when painting plastics, it could eventually peel off with the slightest nick or scratch.
Quote by arowana1027
My wife plays my guitars fine, but my girlfriend has smaller hands, and she wants to learn how to play.
#3
i sanded the pickguard a little before painting and clearcoated it after the paint. and it worked
#4
Well, we painted that back piece where the strings go and to avoid sanding anything here's our plan.

We're going to see if it dries then just cover it using this product I found ...

http://guitararmor.com/

Stuff looks legit, and if I could cover a coat of dry paint with it I think I'd be fine. Think acrylics could dry and I could cover it using that stuff?
#5
Quote by Jornibo
Alright, I own a Chrome Red Fat Stratocaster and I was getting a wicked painting on the pickguard of a phoenix and some stuff, but after the artist started we realized that it's not going to work with acrylics, so what do you suggest?

Once again, I'm not just painting it one color, I'm getting a custom painting done on my pickguard. I really want it to stay for as long as possible so what do you recommend I do?

I posted this earlier on another thread ... so, to be on the safe side, consider:



If you want the paint to not scuff or peel, you need to use:



You have 2 options with Acrylic Paint for Plastic:
  • Paint for Plastic Primer + Acrylic Colorcoat Paint; or,
  • Paint for Plastic Colorcoat.


With either options, you need to lightly scuff sand. Use 400 grit, nothing coarser, or else the scratches will be too deep/rough. 600 is better.

With option 1, you'll have more choices with the colocoat. For example, if you decide on an elaborate or intricate design, the primer for plastic will serve as your base. This is best if your design is at least 3 or more colors.

With option 2, you can stick with a simple 1- or 2-color design. Here's a sample:



It is best to use Clearcoat on Option 1. Clearcoating is optional on Option 2.

Remember, Paint for Plastic will form a molecular bond with your PickGuard's plastic.

Good Luck!

#6
I don't really see why pictures are that necessary. The pickguard is just white but I'm getting this black background with green Northern Lights then covering the aurora borealis is a phoenix, so it's a bunch of colors
#7
But that method seems a lot simpler than others I've seen, so thanks a bunch
#9
Oh, okay. But what do you guys think about letting the acrylics drying and covering it with some of that "guitar armor" which is essentially just a laminating cover?

If that won't work I'll definitely use your method.
#14
To be safe I was going to polyurathane it and then cover it using some cover