#1
i have a major problem when it comes to acoustic...i always catch myself playing a certain song with the same stupid strumming pattern over and over,and eventually,whatever new song i play,i always try it out with the same irritating strummnig pattern...

and when i try my best to freestyle,its almost impossible...

does anyone have this problem,and can anyone tell me how to be able to get a new strumming pattern every single time i pick up my acoustic guitar to practise? Any pointers on how i can practise better?
#2
how long have you been playing?

this is really common among beginners. you practice and practice and practice and finally one day you kinda find some rhythm. you get a little flow going. then you can't get away from that one strumming pattern for months.

if you haven't been playing long, i would just keep at it. try learning new songs that are fairly easy, as in mostly just open chords. listen carefully to each one as you learn it and really try to imitate the artists strumming pattern. some good ones that come to mind are...

oasis - wonderwall
smashing pumpkins - disarm
tom petty - mary jane's last dance
counting crows - mr. jones
otis redding - dock of the bay
old crow medicine show - wagon wheel
neil diamond - cherry, cherry

if you've been playing a little longer and are fairly profficient with both hands, these are some good songs to get you playing some more complex rhythms:

dave matthews band - the stone
dave matthews band - tripping billies
dave matthews band - fool to think
dave matthews band - jimithing
dave matthews band - two step
tool - schism
foo fighters - everlong
radiohead - high and dry
jack johnson - rodeo clowns
the doobie brothers - black water
the doobie brothers - listen to the music

i know that's a lot of dave matthews band and a lot of people hate on him, but whatever. the guy is an acoustic rhythm guitar master and i dig him and i recommend learning his stuff to anyone that wants to be a better rhythm player or guitarist in general.
#3
Almost every O.A.R. live song starts with some kind of seemingly complicated acoustic rhythym. Try imitating some of these.
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Washburn D10s-12
Fender Jimmie Vaughan Strat
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Epiphone G-400 Ltd. w/ EMG's
#4
That's exactly what happenned to me! At first it was just hard for me to strum, then one day I got this strumming pattern that I've been stuck with for a long time, and it's really hard for me to change it
#6
hmm, i actually never had this problem because i started out my musical journey with drums. when i started playing guitar, i could actually strum better patterns than my electric guitarist, haha.

anyway, i know a beginner who has the same problem, except he has a bad habit of stopping his arm from constant motion in order to hit an off beat or whatever he needs to do.

To work on strumming patterns, my advice would be to listen to songs with unique strumming patterns so that it just wouldnt sound right if you didnt do it the same way. play them slowly and repetitively for quite a while and speed up when comfortable. if you start doing the strumming pattern wrong, go back to the very slow speed and slowly bring it up again. you can learn lots of new strumming patterns by doing this.
Last edited by captivate at Feb 13, 2008,
#8
Try playing a fairly simple chord progression (Em-G-D-A for example) and first play quarter strums [four strums in four beats] then play it in eighths [one-and-two-and-three-and-four-and] then play thirds [one-trip-let-two-trip-let-three-trip-let-four-trip-let]. Give each chord one bar, which means four accentuated strums (indicated in bold letters). That is assuming you're playing in 4/4 time anyways. Try this until you get a good feel for rythms and then try more advanced strumming patterns. These will help you get used to timing and strumming.
If you can't feel the music it isn't real.
#9
Quote by mucaslooney
Try playing a fairly simple chord progression (Em-G-D-A for example) and first play quarter strums [four strums in four beats] then play it in eighths [one-and-two-and-three-and-four-and] then play thirds [one-trip-let-two-trip-let-three-trip-let-four-trip-let]. Give each chord one bar, which means four accentuated strums (indicated in bold letters). That is assuming you're playing in 4/4 time anyways. Try this until you get a good feel for rythms and then try more advanced strumming patterns. These will help you get used to timing and strumming.


that is what I attempt to do. good advice.