#1
Hey guys i got my strat body and i need some help to determine the type of bridge i need, i want a 6-screw strat trem, but am unsure of the measurements of the bridge, i have sound a vintage 6-screw for fairly cheap, but the guy says the distance from the center of the E hole to the last e- hole is 2 and 1/8 inches (53.975 mm) while a wilkinson bridge measures 2.2 inches (56mm) for the distance between the two holes, here is a photo of the body and the measure for the bridge cavity lengthwise is 3 and 1/8 inches (80mm) and from bridge cavity to neck pocket is 7 and 5/16 inches (185mm) (dunno if that measure is needed) Please advice me on the type of bridge i need



Thank You Very Much!
regards
PF
Pow-Chika-Wah-Wah
Pow-Chika-Chika-Wah-wah
#2
sure you want a 6 screw... 2's are much nicer,
also, if you havent drilled the holes yet then you could use any bridge that will fit in your cavity.
Quote by chs170
Quote by Carl6661
Quote by chs170
Wow.

This is deep
.
Was the pun intended?
Actually no

E-married to Nikki82
#3
Cool thanks, regarding 2 screw, wat would the difference be? (it just that my buddy and i built one for a school project and use a 6-screw so thats the only i kno of)
Pow-Chika-Wah-Wah
Pow-Chika-Chika-Wah-wah
#4
Ever play a guitar with a Floyd Rose? 2 post trems are generally "full floating" meaning that the bridge is balanced on 2 posts by trem springs and the tension from your strings. Full floating trems are just a little harder to string up and setup (theres a whole bunch of idiots who can't seem to figure out how easy they are to set up), but you can do some serious whammy acrobatics with it. 6 screws are the vintage style where the 6 screws just clamp down the tremolo. These 6 screws are nice for a vintage guitar player or an amateur guitar tech because it's the old standard, but with all 6 screws, you can't really dump the whammy bar like you could on a 2 post.
#5
Quote by aschaetter
Ever play a guitar with a Floyd Rose? 2 post trems are generally "full floating" meaning that the bridge is balanced on 2 posts by trem springs and the tension from your strings. Full floating trems are just a little harder to string up and setup (theres a whole bunch of idiots who can't seem to figure out how easy they are to set up), but you can do some serious whammy acrobatics with it. 6 screws are the vintage style where the 6 screws just clamp down the tremolo. These 6 screws are nice for a vintage guitar player or an amateur guitar tech because it's the old standard, but with all 6 screws, you can't really dump the whammy bar like you could on a 2 post.


Yeah, i really like my 2 screw trem, it can pretty much dive bomb and remain in tune. Also i find them to be much smoother when using vibrato's.
'05 Fender Speed Shop So-Cal Stratocaster
'95 Squier Standard Strat

OLP MM1
Washburn X200v Pro

Tanglewood TW145-SC
Yamaha C40

Orange Dark Terror + PPC212
Jet City JCA20H + JCA24S
#6
Quote by Professor Fate
Cool thanks, regarding 2 screw, wat would the difference be? (it just that my buddy and i built one for a school project and use a 6-screw so thats the only i kno of)

I have one on my strat I made and my dad's american strat has one there pretty much the same thing as long as you don't get a floyd rose type one just a regular strat one but I think they stay in tune a little better and it's not screwed in instead the br idge rests up against grooves in 2 metal posts.
#7
Quote by Madsalty
Yeah, i really like my 2 screw trem, it can pretty much dive bomb and remain in tune. Also i find them to be much smoother when using vibrato's.

A vintage trem can do that too. It's all in the setup.
#8
Quote by mr_hankey
A vintage trem can do that too. It's all in the setup.


Interesting to know, i've played a vintage trem with the two outer screws tight and the 4 inner ones loose and raised, that was pretty smooth, now i come to think of it.
'05 Fender Speed Shop So-Cal Stratocaster
'95 Squier Standard Strat

OLP MM1
Washburn X200v Pro

Tanglewood TW145-SC
Yamaha C40

Orange Dark Terror + PPC212
Jet City JCA20H + JCA24S