#1
Hmm I actually don't know what headroom is. I hear people saying "Blah oh yes this amp gives me alot of headroom blah.."

What is headroom? I tried search bar-ing but nothing came up, please explain
#2
Basically, how much volume you can have without getting distortion.
#3
Quote by johlin
Basically, how much volume you can have without getting distortion.


Huh I don't understand?
#4
Quote by johlin
Basically, how much volume you can have without getting distortion.


This is greatly proportionate to the wattage of your amp. Tubes overdrive at high volumes, while SS amps "clip", resulting in a nasty distortion. There's more to it than wattage, though. It also depends on the kind of tube, layout of amp.

For example, I used to have a Fender Champ that began do distort at about 3 o'clock.

I now have an Epiphone Valve Junior that gets dirty at about 9 o'clock.

Hoped that helped.
Member of the EHX Guild

Yamaha SG500B
Danelectro Fish 'n' Chips EQ
EHX Russian Big Muff
Roland Cube 30
Jake will suffice.

Join the revolution, GG&A.
#5
lots of headroom = goes very loud before distorting.
very little headroom = can't turn it up very loud before it distorts. So would be no good if you wanted to play a clean song loud
#7
Yes. Headroom suggests that you're not adding any extra distortion yourself. It's how loud the clean channel can go before it overdrives and is no longer "clean".

I can explain it no more certain terms than that.
Member of the EHX Guild

Yamaha SG500B
Danelectro Fish 'n' Chips EQ
EHX Russian Big Muff
Roland Cube 30
Jake will suffice.

Join the revolution, GG&A.
#8
Quote by Pooinsky
So is headroom to do with the clean channel on the amp?


Not necessarily, but breakup is more noticeable on the clean channel since there's no distortion already. If you get breakup on a distorted amp, you won't notice it.
#10
If you want a little more information on way it happens, overdrive occurs when too much information is going through the tubes for it to process and it becomes distorted. Distortion on your amp happens in the power amp. This is when the preamp is sending more signal through it then it can handle it and it distorts. The reason higher wattage amps distort are higher volumes is because there are more tubes/transistors in the power amp to process information. You can also get distortion when the speakers have more watts put through them than they can handle. Part of the vintage Marshall crunch came not only from the power section distorting, but the speakers breaking up as well.