#1
how do you find which key a song is in? i know many times is the first chord but how do you theoricly find the key?
#2
Key signature....

Generally with pop songs it's the first chord is the key they use...
#3
yeah i know that, but if you have a chord progression how do you know the key? may be the first chord or may be not, if its not then you mess up trying to improvise.

edit: how do you logically find the key??
edit2: i just answered your capo question lol
Last edited by sucay at Feb 13, 2008,
#5
In many cases, it's the first chord played, but that is definitely no concrete rule. Quick example: "Sorry" by Buckcherry. The first chord is a G, but the song is in some form of D.

Not to mention that many songs change keys. "Walk This Way"(Switches between E and C), "Sweet Emotion"(A, the song ends in E), and "Cryin'" (Switches between G and A), all by Aerosmith, switch keys. "Sweet Child O' Mine" also does this (First half of song is Db, but changes to Eb at the end). If you are able to play an instrument, it's as simple as playing a chord during a part of the song. You can tell if the chord sounds like it's the root note.
#6
Easy way: Go from an open 6th string to fret 11 and see which note sounds likes it fits the best while you're listening to the song.

Theoretical way: Find out what notes are used in the song, there may be some that are added here and there but look for a prominent set of 8 notes and then look at the relationship between them. Then figure out which note the song seems to be pulling towards. From there the intervals should tell you if you're in a maj/min scale, etc, and the note that seems to be the focus of the song is the root. To be honest it's not always a very clear cut business but when you start learning theory it'll make sense.
#7
look for the chord that is constantly being used or resolved to as the tonic, sort of like what ^he said.
#8
its the chord that the songs resolves to or "sounds at rest" on (99.999999999999999% of the time, i think i've heard literally a song or 2 that don't end on the root) also RTFS

Quote by mattvl
Easy way: Go from an open 6th string to fret 11 and see which note sounds likes it fits the best while you're listening to the song.

Theoretical way: Find out what notes are used in the song, there may be some that are added here and there but look for a prominent set of 8 notes and then look at the relationship between them. Then figure out which note the song seems to be pulling towards. From there the intervals should tell you if you're in a maj/min scale, etc, and the note that seems to be the focus of the song is the root. To be honest it's not always a very clear cut business but when you start learning theory it'll make sense.


7 notes in a diatonic scale, not 8. if you'll RTFS it explains it pretty easily.
#9
Quote by z4twenny
its the chord that the songs resolves to or "sounds at rest" on (99.999999999999999% of the time, i think i've heard literally a song or 2 that don't end on the root) also RTFS


7 notes in a diatonic scale, not 8. if you'll RTFS it explains it pretty easily.



RTFS? Can you explain what that stands for?