#1
well i can buy a really cheap guitar with solid alder body ,I dont know if changing the pickups will make it really good and sound like expensive one.

i like to know whats the most expensive wood ,and why is a guitar more expensive than the others.........

and do the electronics inside matters so buying cheap guitar and changing pickups is not a good idea?
#2
say you got a strat knock off, and put in some nice fender single coils, it wouldn't sound exactly like a fender strat, but it would sound fairly good. and it could be a good project guitar.
#3
quality of materials, other than wood

ie, pups, machine heads, bridges, what there made out of, quality of electronics,

prise comes down to quality of craftmen ship as well,
if it was made completely by machine or hand, or a bit of both.

if the body was right and you put in some fender pups, it wuold sound liek a real fender.
but it most prbably wouldnt PLAY like one, or feel as nice to play.

price comes from when someone makes a guitar, that is nice to play, and sounds good.
not one or the other.
*Enter Sig Here*
#4
I asked the guys who run the local guitar shop the same question last weekend. I have a Squier Affinity Strat and was planning on upgrading to Fender noiseless pickups and a locking nut. He told me, you have a guitar worth $125. It costs something like $300 to have someone do that for you, and then you'd have a guitar worth $135. Which is why I am now saving to buy a real Fender American Strat instead. I mentioned the same thing you did...my Squier is made of alder and most Strats are made of alder, so with good pups wouldn't they be almost the same thing? He said Fender actually chooses the best alder they can find for their guitars, while Squier will pick up any piece of crap off the factory floor, as long as there's enough wood to cut a body out of. (By the way, on one web site they had replacement Squier pups for like $11 each, so they're way crappier than I thought. That's compared to $150 for a set of the Fender noiseless.)

It seems like ash Strats are more expensive than alder, so I assume they're better. And Matt Bellamy's (Muse) customs are made of mahogany. He can afford whatever he wants, so I'm guessing mahogany is pretty sweet.
#5
ok THE most expensive wood used on guitars are brazillian rosewood which is damn hard to find these days. (i think)

if you buy a crappy $200 guitar then change EVERYTHING i mean, pick ups, electronics (e.g. pots, caps.), tuners, trussrod, bridge, neck(?)....

it would sound pretty close but it still would not be the same as a $5000 guitar.
wood has a lot to do with tone so no matter the eletronics you could not get it to sound exactly like the expensive guitar. (IMO)

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#6
Quote by chichong
well i can buy a really cheap guitar with solid alder body ,I dont know if changing the pickups will make it really good and sound like expensive one.

i like to know whats the most expensive wood ,and why is a guitar more expensive than the others.........

and do the electronics inside matters so buying cheap guitar and changing pickups is not a good idea?

There's no single part of a guitar that makes it play well, sound good, or anything of the sort.

That said, if you like how a guitar feels, and it's well constructed (For example, solid neck pocket construction - the heel should fit tightly into the pocket, well crowned and leveled frets, stays in tune...etc...) then go for it.

But not just any cheap guitar will sound like a Fender with a pickup change. Pickups are only a part of the equation.
#7
i really love the guitar i have now, and it sounds pretty good, especially the bridge humbucker, its just mainly the single coils that i have a problem with, not as rich as i'd like. I'm going to keep my guitar no matter what, and i just want to upgrade the pickups.
#9
Quote by forsaknazrael
There's no single part of a guitar that makes it play well, sound good, or anything of the sort.
.

well I disagree with that.,when I was on a guitar shop I saw a 2 guitars that look exactly the same , i ask the employee why is the that one more expensive he said the guitar is the same but the pickups is different..... the guitar has stock pick ups and the other has some kind of dimarzio and it sounds way better.......
#10
Yep... Pickup,string gauss and amp is 90% of your guitar's sound. Wood's type can give noticeable different in tone and sustain but nothing really critical important if you're not a huge guitar-nerd.
For me, the most important thing on a new guitar is it's neck's feel. That's where you play.
#11
Quote by chichong
well I disagree with that.,when I was on a guitar shop I saw a 2 guitars that look exactly the same , i ask the employee why is the that one more expensive he said the guitar is the same but the pickups is different..... the guitar has stock pick ups and the other has some kind of dimarzio and it sounds way better.......

Well, he's a moron. Yes, they may be made of the same wood...but are they constructed the same? Are their hardware made of the same material? Are both Trem blocks made from rolled steel? Are the saddles brass on both of them? Are the neck pockets constructed tightly? Are the frets crowned and levels on both of them? Are the finishes on both guitars the same - nitrocellulose is a better quality than most polyurethane finishes.
There's A LOT of things that are different. Pickups are not ALL of a guitar's sound. They contribute, but if I slap some nice pickups on a ****tily made guitar, it's not going to sound that great.
#12
There are a lot of factors involved. As said above, amps and pick-ups are a very predominant factor in the tone. There is a difference between it sounding exactly like a Fender or it sounding good.

In a lot of cases, you do find guitarists who found a model of guitar they find comfortable and just modify it to suit their needs. If you are more comfortable playing that guitar and want to modify it, then modify it. If anything, resale value on a cheap guitar is much less important, so they are much better to experiment on. You can find quite a lot of guitars where the modifications are more expensive than the guitar itself. Ritchie Blackmore and Yngwie Malmsteen probably had a higher cost to the modifications they made to their guitars (at least until Fender started just giving them guitars to their spec), then the original Stratocasters they use cost. Scalloping the fretboard is a lot of work, both changed out the pick-ups, and I know Ritchie Blackmore has a custom tone circuit in his guitars as well.

A lot of this sort of thing is subjective. There are quite a few brands that make knock off Fenders that some people consider to be superior to Fender. There is nothing magical about the Fender logo that causes it to magically sound better, a well constructed guitar is good, but pick-ups and amp are very important overall.

In the end though, the amp is the most important thing. Technique is also important, too, it doesn't matter how good your equipment is if your playing sounds terrible in the first place.
#13
^ & ^^ +X^0

I always thought that the amp was the most important component for your tone. A blah and inexpensive guitar + a nice tube/valve amp >>> a Custom Shop guitar + blah SS amp.

Anyway, some tone chasers favor the slimmer Squier necks with the smaller nuts and the Alder body of the Affinity series is an excellent platform to launch your heavy mods.

#14
Quote by AndyfrmUpstairs

And Matt Bellamy's (Muse) customs are made of mahogany. He can afford whatever he wants, so I'm guessing mahogany is pretty sweet.



mahogany is what they is what gibson uses to make les pauls it gets a deeper sounding tone and some argue it has more sustain... so its easyer for a guitar like that to acheave a heavyer sound.
#15
Quote by hminh87
Yep... Pickup,string gauss and amp is 90% of your guitar's sound. Wood's type can give noticeable different in tone and sustain but nothing really critical important if you're not a huge guitar-nerd.
For me, the most important thing on a new guitar is it's neck's feel. That's where you play.


well said my frend well said
#16
Mostly good advice so far, especially from forsaknazreal. Alder is a decent tonewood unless its a very bad cut of it. Putting good pickups in a cheap guitar boils down to three things:
1. Usually it costs as much as the guitar.
2. If you absolutley love the guitar and will keep it for a real long time go for it, but it adds nothing to the resale value for the most part.
3. Realize that no matter how you upgrade a cheap guitar it probably will never sound like the original.
#17
Quote by jeremylp
ok THE most expensive wood used on guitars are brazillian rosewood which is damn hard to find these days. (i think)

if you buy a crappy $200 guitar then change EVERYTHING i mean, pick ups, electronics (e.g. pots, caps.), tuners, trussrod, bridge, neck(?)....

it would sound pretty close but it still would not be the same as a $5000 guitar.
wood has a lot to do with tone so no matter the eletronics you could not get it to sound exactly like the expensive guitar. (IMO)



They say guitar manufacturers have to wait for one of those trees to
die of natural causes and fall over.

I agree...Upgrading a cheaper guitar can make a very cool ..one of a kind
custom. But if ur gonna invest $200 then..$400 for upgrades..just deal
with what u have for a lil while longer and get an awesome $600 guitar.
Nothin can beat a guitar that plays like butter. Some of us that have tried
upgrading before..ended up out-growing the guitar anyway. You may end
up full of regret and having to start all over with your money. Unless you
find a knock-around guitar at a price they are practically giving away.....
Buy the upper-end quality.

putting $5,000 into a fast and furious $3000 honda civic will make a beast.
But it still gets humiliated by the porsche...
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett