#1
I have been stuck in a rut with the Pentatonic scale and was wanting to spice up my sound. Anyone know what would be a good scale for rock and roll? I play a lot of psychedelic music and alternative also.

In addition I was wondering how I can play lead better, like creating melodies, learning certain tricks. Some times I don't feel very comfortable with my playing and feel like I don't know how to step out of the box, I mean that literally. If any of you have any good suggestion, videos, or sites, I would appreciate it to the fullest.

Thanks.
#2
Id definately learn the major and minor scales. Those are maybe the most commonly used scales in Rock music.
#4
Quote by Pastorius666
personally i love the minor blues scale, with an added major 3rd. I dont really know why.



the minor blues scale does not have an added major 3rd. it has an added flattened 5th

the intervals are

root, bthird, forth, bfifth, fifth, b seventh

Root, b3, 4 b5, 5 ,b7
song stuck in my head today


#5
Quote by lbc_sublime
the minor blues scale does not have an added major 3rd. it has an added flattened 5th

the intervals are

root, bthird, forth, bfifth, fifth, b seventh

Root, b3, 4 b5, 5 ,b7


Sounds to me like he was saying a blues scale with an added major third. Ya know, since that is what he said?

That is, 1 b3 natural3 4 b5 5 b7
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#6
I usually just improvise based in a pentatonic scale, and I modify it as necessary, just because rock music is so flexible when it comes to improvising.
#7
Quote by seedmole
Sounds to me like he was saying a blues scale with an added major third. Ya know, since that is what he said?

That is, 1 b3 natural3 4 b5 5 b7



no that is not what he said. he said the minor blues scale

the formula for the minor blues sclae is a stated now to the other post improvising is a great idea and fully support it if you find putting the major 3rd in sounds good than by all means do it
song stuck in my head today


#8
Quote by lbc_sublime
no that is not what he said. he said the minor blues scale

the formula for the minor blues sclae is a stated now to the other post improvising is a great idea and fully support it if you find putting the major 3rd in sounds good than by all means do it


I know what he said, but apparently you don't (even though you should; you did quote it).

He said "personally i love the minor blues scale, with an added major 3rd." Please note how he placed the comma after the word "scale," so as to indicate that the "added major 3rd," of which he speaks, is "an added major third." I don't know why anybody would say "added major 3rd," if they didn't mean "an added major 3rd."

Reading comprehension ftw.
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#9
Quote by seedmole
I know what he said, but apparently you don't (even though you should; you did quote it).

He said "personally i love the minor blues scale, with an added major 3rd." Please note how he placed the comma after the word "scale," so as to indicate that the "added major 3rd," of which he speaks, is "an added major third." I don't know why anybody would say "added major 3rd," if they didn't mean "an added major 3rd."

Reading comprehension ftw.



comprehension ftw indeed

i misunderstood and thought he meant that it had an added major 3rd instaed of the b 5th. as you probably already noticed
song stuck in my head today


#10
Quote by seedmole
I know what he said, but apparently you don't (even though you should; you did quote it).

He said "personally i love the minor blues scale, with an added major 3rd." Please note how he placed the comma after the word "scale," so as to indicate that the "added major 3rd," of which he speaks, is "an added major third." I don't know why anybody would say "added major 3rd," if they didn't mean "an added major 3rd."

Reading comprehension ftw.

lol huked on fonix
#11
Quote by CowboyUp
lol huked on fonix


it werkd fer mee~!
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#12
Nice to see you all getting deep into conversation, but can anyone give me any tips or suggestions?

Thanks.
#13
ok well 1 stop thinking about the scale a s a position and start thinking about it as 1 scale across the whole neck.

2 there was a suggestion of the minor blues scale. which is the minor pent with an added flat fifth and for another suggestion someone said also add a major 3rd. which u can see i got burned on lol.
song stuck in my head today


#15
one good exercise is to rethink what you are playing in the pentatonic boxes...

focus on thinking of a lick in your head, and trying to approximate that sound using your scale patterns. Remember that most catchy melodies are only a few notes, and are usually in a very simple scale. Experiment with how long you hold notes, what notes you go to, and how far away from each other they are intervalically. Work on playing the boxes high to low, not just low to high. Plot out the positions of the five notes in your pentatonic scale, and create some new box patterns to play in. Try bending notes differently and in different places. Try adding vibrato and legato to your box patterns.
#16
^ perfect...

this isnt really that great... but i once heard country uses alot of sliding in from two frets below...

i like it
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#17
Quote by lbc_sublime
no that is not what he said. he said the minor blues scale

the formula for the minor blues sclae is a stated now to the other post improvising is a great idea and fully support it if you find putting the major 3rd in sounds good than by all means do it


No, he said the minor blues scale with an added major third..
#18
Quote by ouchies
No, he said the minor blues scale with an added major third..


we already went through this so don't worry about it just read above
song stuck in my head today


#19
I hear what you are saying. I generally just play one or two or the five positions in the minor pentatonic scale. I'm tried of staying in the box. How do I play the scale across the neck of the guitar? If you could give me an example, I often use the Em/G major Penatonic scale. Thank you much!
#20
well if you are already playing the five pentatonic patterns, you already know the scale across the neck, it's jsut a matter of interweaving between them.
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#22
Quote by Kozworth
Exactly. This is what I am wanting to do...need help figuring it out.


basically, it's all up to you. The only reason that you don't already weave the positions together is that you don't know them all well enough, and that you have a mental barrier telling you that in order to stay "safe" and stay in key and still be playing something cool, you need to stay within the box at your current finger position.

the nice thing about a mental barrier is that all you need to do is forget about it and decide on a "new" way to play guitar. some of it will be physical... you'll need to get used to shifting positions more, and get out of the pattern of playing from the lowest string to the highest.

a good way to help with playing all over the neck is to learn about intervals, and how their pattern on the fretboard relates to scales. click the links in my sig to get some very digestable info on the subject... basically, if you know your intervals, you can play any scale, in any key, in any direction on the neck, as long as you know the first note.
#23
Train yourself to hear the intervals in relation to the root note so that you always know where you are.

The 7th and 2nd are obviously the easiest ones to hear, 3rds being the next, so train yourself especially to hear the 6th, 5th and 4th.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#24
is what you guys are talking about, lock it up under lessons or columns.
#26
Alright, first off I do know the pentatonic scales very well. I generally play Em/G Major Pentatonic because I know it best and my chord progressions just generally work with it. I am currently learning the major scales as suggested. Would it be fair to say that I ought to learn the minor scales next?

Also, I understand 1st, 2nds, 3rd...etc in terms of the major scale. Bascially they are the notes in the 8 note scale, like the first in G major is G and the 8th is also G. Right? How does that work in the Pentatonic Scale? I'm also wondering what you mean by intervals? (In English please).

Thanks, everyone has been very helpful.
#27
the intervals of the major scale are the 1st, 2nd, 3rd,4th,5th,6th, 7th, 8th(octave)....etc

also know as

C = perfect prime (perfect root)
D = major second
E = major third
F = perfect fourth
G = perfect fifth
A = major sixth
B = major seventh
C = perfect octave

i assume you know the WWHWWWH to get the major scale

as an example Cmajor

CDEFGABC
12345678

so to make any maj pent scale you would use the intervals
1 2 3 5 6

so the major pent of Cmaj would be

CDEFGABC
12345678

thus making C major pent:

CDEGA

does that make sence

and yes i would recommend learning thee minor scale after the major for it will help you understand the minor pent

a maj pent is a 5 note scale based off the maj's 7 note scale 8 notes if you incluse the octave
song stuck in my head today


#28
I hear what you are saying. It's all very interesting. I guess since I know the Pentatonic Scale, I will work on Major and then Minor. Hopefully that'll spice up my playing. Although half of my problem is not knowing any tricks or awesome soloing patterns, any suggestions in that category?

I realize half of soloing is creating a melody or "talking" through your playing, but most times I find myself just going through the scale and changing the pattern up a bit with bends and stuff.
#29
Yeah, playing up and down the scale is an easy rut to fall into. My advice is to learn solos by rock and metal players like Tony Iommi, Slash and Jimmy Page who make exceptional use of the pentatonic scale.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#30
Do you mean actual rock 'n' roll (eg Buddy Holly) or rock in general?
If the former - blues scales with some 9ths and 6ths are usually good. Lots of double stops and slides, small bends etc.
If the latter - large bends, wide vibrato, learn your pentatonics in all positions (progress to diatonic scales if you like). Learn some licks (Slash, Jimmy Page, Eric Johnson, Zakk Wylde, Steve Morse, Satch ), you will start to see patterns and be able to incorporate them. Once you've practiced and developed your ear, you should be able to 'hear' what you're about to play in your head.
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#31
To get really outside the box, you could think more like a jazz musician. Most jazz musicians play to the underlying chord. Marty Friedman has a pretty good video on this that you can find for free on the web.

Essentially you start thinking about how the guitar works symphonically with other instruments. Its pretty cool once you get the hang of it and it really sounds melodic without sounding cheesy or overly technical.
#33
Kozworth, check your PM's
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#34
Aeolian Mode/Minor Scale
^
|
(IDK how to spell it. is that right?)
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