#1
and I feel pretty accomplished about it.

I haven't gotten an intro yet, really just a bunch of parts that I think are awesome.

a "verse" is


e
B
D 5 5 10
G 7 7 9
A 0 6 8
E

and then I have

e
B 5 3
D 5 4
G 7 5
A
E

the rhythm is a bit funky thrash

Am x x x x Am x x x x Am x x G G G

the X's are mutes on the same strings

I really don't like the G chord, but I'm not sure what else to use

I was thinking

e
B 5 4
D x x
G 7 5
A
E

but wouldn't that throw it out of key?

then for the bridge I have

e 0 0 0 0
B 0 0 0 0
D 9 7 5 4
G 10 9 7 5
A
E

with some fills in


any suggestions?
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#2
Quote by TDKshorty



I was thinking

e
B 5 4
D x x
G 7 5
A
E

but wouldn't that throw it out of key?




It doesn't matter if it goes out of key, as long as you think that it sounds good. A part in your verse, I think it was, is out of key with having a note on the A string 6th fret (D#) but if that sounds good then why should it matter? Sometimes going out of key adds tension and makes the song more interesting.
#5
I'm already in there for my solo on my page

check it out and tell me what you think

but this is for my band, I just don't like the transition from Am- G it's not what the song is supposed to sound like, but I can't put my finger on what I want it to sound like

I don't care if it throws it out of key really, but I just want some more opinions
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#6
It doesn't matter if your song leaves key here and there. I heard this rock and roll song a while back, I can't remember what it was, but it's a typical thing.. Anyway, the main riff was in A major pentatonic, and the chorus went to C then D, then back to A Major. This in theory is moving into something like G for the chorus, but it worked really well.

There's a Bob Seger song that plays some kind of major chord, and then the same chord with a minor third instead of a major third, but it sounds cool. So the lesson learned here is that leaving key isn't a bad thing. Don't limit yourself to one key. You could almost equate it to ice cream; if you want more than one flavor, then get more than one. Same with guitar solos; if you want to play a solo in a minor key, then play it there, but then all of a sudden want some major licks, it's okay to do that. It's the same here. You're only as limited as your imagination with music.
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#7
I dont know exactly how you play it but i like the sound of the chords and how you you only played some of the notes in them, i always kind of saw that as a funky sort of think and thats what i like. Like the little frusciante tribute you've got.
#8
I can't tell what it's supposed to sound like. Do you have Power Tab? If not, I suggest downloading it.
#9
well I would post, but I don't want people stealing my ideas


it's funky, but I've been influence by The Fall of Troy and Mars Volta while writing this, but my friend gives it a bit of an arctic monkeys twist when he plays it, but I'm not too fond of the G chord after it

what other options do I have?

just try it yourself, it doesn't really matter the speed, as long as you have the rhytm down

its a medium tempo
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#10
Do you usually string you G and D strings backwards?
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#11
Don't worry about going out of key. But if it's absolutely driving you nuts, playing a tritone(D#/Eb in A minor) is just borrowing from the blues scale. Hope that offers some "consolation".

Quote by Page&HammettFan
There's a Bob Seger song that plays some kind of major chord, and then the same chord with a minor third instead of a major third, but it sounds cool. So the lesson learned here is that leaving key isn't a bad thing. Don't limit yourself to one key. You could almost equate it to ice cream; if you want more than one flavor, then get more than one. Same with guitar solos; if you want to play a solo in a minor key, then play it there, but then all of a sudden want some major licks, it's okay to do that. It's the same here. You're only as limited as your imagination with music.


I'm gonna go ahead and blindly assume that it was in a major key and that said major and minor chords were IV and iv respectively. The minor third in the minor chord is borrowing from the relative harmonic minor scale, and that resolves really pretty-like to the I (in C major it'd be F Fm(technically Fsus#2) C) and builds some tension.

These are just some common instances of leaving key that can be explained. Leaving key really can be easy if you know what kind of sound each method will provide and what sound you're going for. Another commonly used one is something like I I7 vi iim7b5, which in C major is C, C7, Am, Dm7b5(alternatively Fm6). The C7 can be explained by trying to get the mixolydian sound with the minor seventh, which works particularly well since C has already been established as a nice tonal center. The Dm7b5/Fm5 is just the IV iv I thing I was talking about.
Last edited by grampastumpy at Feb 15, 2008,
#12
^
That's great, but wouldn't iim7b5 technically be written II7b5? The II of your regular major scale is going to be a minor chord, so wouldn't/could you write it that way?
Got Death Magnetic a day early!

The Low-Cardinal of Zeppelinism - If you're a diehard fan of Zeppelin, join Zeppelinism here


Winner of the "Biggest Led Zeppelin Fuck" award in the CR forum (2 years running!)
#13
I'm not worried about going out of key if it sounds good

but I'm not to fond of the Am- G sound in "chorus" and I don't know what else to use,

right now I'm into abstract chords, but I'm not sure what to use after it
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#14
Quote by Page&HammettFan
^
That's great, but wouldn't iim7b5 technically be written II7b5? The II of your regular major scale is going to be a minor chord, so wouldn't/could you write it that way?
I'm pretty sure that would indicate a 7b5 chord formed on the second degree(D F# Ab C here).

Quote by TDKshorty
I'm not worried about going out of key if it sounds good

but I'm not to fond of the Am- G sound in "chorus" and I don't know what else to use,

right now I'm into abstract chords, but I'm not sure what to use after it


Maybe an E major? D minor? Just a power chord to keep it harmonically streamlined?
Last edited by grampastumpy at Feb 15, 2008,