#1
I was looking into these little units and wanted to try one of them just to see how well they work and have some fun with them.

Anyways I was looking at these two and I just wanted to know which would be the best?
Is the extra money really worth it for the higher priced recorder?

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/compare?base_pid=240282&base_pid=240744
Last edited by moody07747 at Feb 15, 2008,
#2
If you ever expect to do anything more than jot down ideas to tape for future recording, I would say that you would need at least a Boss BR-600 or a Fostex MR8-HD. Honestly, if you want to get started recording with a good enough quality to make the recordings sound good to a criticizing audience, you're going to HAVE to go digital, and you're prbably going to want AT LEAST 8 tracks. You really need: a track for drums, a track for vocals, a track for bass, and 2 tracks for guitar. However, it is HIGHLY recommended that you have a track for backup vocals, and you record in stereo (which requires the use of 2 tracks) for your drums. And since even the minimum mentioned above uses a total of 5 tracks, you're going to want an 8-track recorder (because they don't make 5-tracks)

I went ahead and bought a Boss BR-900 CD that was pre-used on ebay, and I LOVE IT. It has built-in effects for the electric guitar, and it also has a ton of amp models as well. The fact that it's digital means that you can punch in and out of a song if you make a mistake automatically without having to worry about pressing the button to make it stop recording. (Plus if you make a BIG mistake, you can simply press the "undo" button. The Boss BR-600 basically has all of these functions, and costs about $350, and i imagine you could get it cheaper on e-bay. Really though, i highly recommend getting AT LEAST an 8-track digital recorder that can grow with you for more than a couple months. If you don't have the money, hold off and get the money later. If you really want to get seriously multitracking, you won't regret it!
#3
I already have a fair digital setup with the PC, im just looking to try out an analog mini setup since I've never even tried one of these before.

a high end portable setup would be great too since I dont have one of those but I am planning on getting a Yamaha digital mixer and Alesis 24 track HD recorder so I will be able to record a full band on location when needed.

Im just looking to have fun and try one of these analog mini recorders which could also be useful for those quick ideas I get where I don't feel like loading all the hardware and software up just to record.
Last edited by moody07747 at Feb 18, 2008,
#4
if you just want it for jotting down little ideas, then I think either one of those 4-tracks will be fine, but actually, I think it'd be better if you looked for a used digital 4-track on ebay or something. I got a used digital multi-track for $120 on ebay, so you should at least try that before spending $100 on a tiny little analog recorder.
#5
well i think you have the right idea then, 4 track for recording ideas is perfectly fine you're not looking to have a professional finalized mix and mastered track i assume so dont waste money if you already have the comp for better recordings and when you do consider going digital and spending the money, take a look at protools... that is something on its own level, awesome recording and editing capabilities
#6
I don't think you people understand that he already has the high end digital setup he needs and wants something analog for FUN. He doesn't need advice on protools, MTRs, computers, or any of that nonsense.

I personally have never used analog gear beyond an old tapedeck back in the day so I'm of no use here.
#7
If you want "fun" go analog reel to reel. all the warmth and dynamics you want
#8
Quote by MrPillow
I don't think you people understand that he already has the high end digital setup he needs and wants something analog for FUN. He doesn't need advice on protools, MTRs, computers, or any of that nonsense.

I personally have never used analog gear beyond an old tapedeck back in the day so I'm of no use here.



well i think you have the right idea then, 4 track for recording ideas is perfectly fine you're not looking to have a professional finalized mix and mastered track i assume so dont waste money if you already have the comp for better recordings



.... what don't i understand?

Quote by moody07747


a high end portable setup would be great too since I dont have one of those but I am planning on getting a Yamaha digital mixer and Alesis 24 track HD recorder so I will be able to record a full band on location when needed.



Quote by Scott3229
... and when you do consider going digital and spending the money, take a look at protools... that is something on its own level, awesome recording and editing capabilities


i was giving my input on that....


... read before you comment.... it won't make you look so ignorant
Last edited by Scott3229 at Feb 15, 2008,
#9
when you do consider going digital and spending the money, take a look at protools... that is something on its own level, awesome recording and editing capabilities


I think it'd be better if you looked for a used digital 4-track on ebay or something. I got a used digital multi-track for $120 on ebay, so you should at least try that before spending $100 on a tiny little analog recorder.



f you ever expect to do anything more than jot down ideas to tape for future recording, I would say that you would need at least a Boss BR-600 or a Fostex MR8-HD. Honestly, if you want to get started recording with a good enough quality to make the recordings sound good to a criticizing audience, you're going to HAVE to go digital, and you're prbably going to want AT LEAST 8 tracks...


I was jesting at comments more in this realm, but take it however you wish.
#10
I'll keep an eye out on ebay for both a Fostex X-12 and Fostex MR-8mkII

The Analog is once again just for fun but I would probably use the digital MTR or more of my ideas as I could feed them into the laptop or PC if needed.
#11
Quote by MrPillow
I was jesting at comments more in this realm, but take it however you wish.



yea once again read my comment, the protools was in response to part of his post
#12
Quote by gnome_hovel7
If you ever expect to do anything more than jot down ideas to tape for future recording, I would say that you would need at least a Boss BR-600 or a Fostex MR8-HD. Honestly, if you want to get started recording with a good enough quality to make the recordings sound good to a criticizing audience, you're going to HAVE to go digital, and you're prbably going to want AT LEAST 8 tracks. You really need: a track for drums, a track for vocals, a track for bass, and 2 tracks for guitar. However, it is HIGHLY recommended that you have a track for backup vocals, and you record in stereo (which requires the use of 2 tracks) for your drums. And since even the minimum mentioned above uses a total of 5 tracks, you're going to want an 8-track recorder (because they don't make 5-tracks)


Oh.... My.... God.... Where the hell do I start?

Perhaps the most notable employer of the 4-track tape machine was Frank Zappa. Legend has it he once got 48 tracks on to a 4-track cassette using the bouncing technique. Anyways, have a listen to some of his studio albums, or better yet, look in to the Olivia Tremor Control. You will not believe you are hearing music recorded with a 4-track cassette machine. They are not just 'sketchpads', they are capable of, in the right hands, producing entire albums.

You don't need a digital setup to make your music sound good! Most of the music you listen to was recorded on tape. Digital recording is simply easier and more affordable. I agree with you about 8-tracks though, but that's because I'm not good enough to get by with just 4. Anyways, like I said about, the bouncing technique can leave you with as many instruments as you want. Look it up.

I went ahead and bought a Boss BR-900 CD that was pre-used on ebay, and I LOVE IT. It has built-in effects for the electric guitar, and it also has a ton of amp models as well. The fact that it's digital means that you can punch in and out of a song if you make a mistake automatically without having to worry about pressing the button to make it stop recording. (Plus if you make a BIG mistake, you can simply press the "undo" button. The Boss BR-600 basically has all of these functions, and costs about $350, and i imagine you could get it cheaper on e-bay. Really though, i highly recommend getting AT LEAST an 8-track digital recorder that can grow with you for more than a couple months. If you don't have the money, hold off and get the money later. If you really want to get seriously multitracking, you won't regret it!


Hah. I have an 8-track Fostex reel-to-reel tape recorder from the 1980's with that exact same feature. It's old technology, dude.

Moody, I used to have a high-end computer based DAW. Now I play Counter-Strike on that machine and record with my Fostex R8 and Mackie 1604-VLZ3. It is AWESOME. Trust me dude, once you go analog, you'll never go back (I know it doesn't rhyme ).

Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#13
muphin is right many people do you use analog signals recording and even live still because they believe (and are probably right) it gives them the most uninterrupted sound possible, there are obviously spaces in digital audio, you can see it in a digital audio wave,, however where i disagree is im fairly certain that most of what you hear today is digital not tape because like you said its cheaper, but its also faster, and much easier to process, store, edit, mix and master...

i think you're right about everything else, but if we are talking modern technology, that would be a pain in the ass to bounce all those track on a 4 track haha, and you better know what your doing because your not getting them back to edit once you bounce them on an analog 4 track but i love the time tested things nonetheless

and nice pic too btw pretty cool
#14
I have the Tascam. Very nice unit, I purchased it a few years ago when it was $150. It has brought me much use, and I have been able to do a lot with it. Analog set ups are fun. But what I really reccomend to you is purchasing a reel to reel unit on ebay, or you can find one on craigslist. That is my next purchase. They can be found for under $100 bucks, the 4 tracks, but not to sure about shipping.
#15
Hehe, the first person to reply obviously hasn't spent much time on this forum before.
There is poetry in despair.
#16
Quote by freshtunes
I have the Tascam. Very nice unit, I purchased it a few years ago when it was $150. It has brought me much use, and I have been able to do a lot with it. Analog set ups are fun. But what I really reccomend to you is purchasing a reel to reel unit on ebay, or you can find one on craigslist. That is my next purchase. They can be found for under $100 bucks, the 4 tracks, but not to sure about shipping.


I have couple of Fostex 4 track cassettes (need to get rid of one of them) that I started recording with, but I've been on the lookout for a reel-to-reel just to have around. I have some stuff that I recorded back in the dark ages that is still on 1/4 inch reel tape that I'd like to take off. Plus if you get one with Sound On Sound and Sound With Sound, with some creative patch chord work, you can get a neat tape echo going.

Heck I go back to the day, when it wasn't cut and paste, it was slice and tape!!

Tony
#17
ok so change of plans....
for general ideas around the house I plane on getting and using the Fostex MR-8mkII and just to look good around the studio AND to use every now and then I'll keep an eye out for a used reel to reel.

I'll have to upgrade my analog mixer to something with more out buses but thats no problem...once I get money...
#18
Quote by fridge_raider
Hehe, the first person to reply obviously hasn't spent much time on this forum before.



haha yeah, thats exactly what i was thinking.