#1
I am putting together a list of movable chords to help with my jazz tunes. Right now, I am working on different types of major chords.

So far I just have the standard Major and Major 7th. My question is, When you take a Major 7th chord (R 3 7) and add a b5 (R 3 7 b5), is that still technically a major 7 chord? Or is a completely different chord? I was thinking it would be something like a Cmaj7b5.

Also, what other major chords are there? Could I just have a root and a 3rd, stick anything else with it and call it "major"?
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Last edited by WlCmToTheJungle at Feb 15, 2008,
#3
It would probably be called #11 rather than a b5, because the #11 occurs naturally in the IV chord but the b5 isn't common in major chords.
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#6
Quote by Rebelw/outaCord
It would probably be called #11 rather than a b5, because the #11 occurs naturally in the IV chord but the b5 isn't common in major chords.



I don't really see what your saying, I mean, there both the same note
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#7
Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
I don't really see what your saying, I mean, there both the same note


No, they aren't. A b5 would imply that the note is functioning as the fifth of the chord, but it isn't. Saying that a b5 and a #4 are the same thing is like saying that "there" and "their" mean the same thing just because they sound the same. That said, if there is no 5 in the chord, as in the case of 1-3-(b5/#4)-7, I would call it a maj7b5 chord. This still depends on the context, a chord build off of F in a C major progression that consists of the intervals 1-3-b5/#4-7 would be more accurately described as a maj7#11 chord with the fifth omitted.
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Feb 15, 2008,
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
No, they aren't. A b5 would imply that the note is functioning as the fifth of the chord, but it isn't. Saying that a b5 and a #4 are the same thing is like saying that "there" and "their" mean the same thing just because they sound the same.



ok, i see what your saying, heres another question for my information:

you can also technically name the chord Cmaj7 (#4) right?
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Dean Performer Acoustic

#9
Well, you should take it this way: a chord is a dominant7th chord if it contains the major 3rd, and the minor 7th. You can add almost any other note to that, because it will still have the dominant function. For instance, your chord will still ask for an F chord as next right?
#10
Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
ok, i see what your saying, heres another question for my information:

you can also technically name the chord Cmaj7 (#4) right?


The context would determine which one is correct. A chord build off of F in a C major progression that consists of the intervals 1-3-b5/#4-7 would be more accurately described as a maj7#11 chord with the fifth omitted. With no context whatsoever, it could be either one.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
When you talk about the b5 vs #4, there's a good justification behind it.

Calling the tritone a #4 allows you to use it so that you can also get the perfect fifth into the scale. A seven tone scale doesnt work with 2 fifths- it must have a 1,2, 3,4,5,6, and 7, but only one of each.

Also, the Lydian mode is really important because of the I chord- a perfect 4th is the avoid note against the Maj7 chord, but the #4 sounds cool and exotic. Thus, it is used very commonly over both the tonic and the subdominant.

The b5, by comparison, appears naturally only in the vii dim chord, which becomes a Min7 b5 when you add the 7th to it. The Subdominant chord is used much more than the leading chord, thus the increased popularity of #4 nomenclature over the last 70 years as such dissonances became acceptable.


When writing the chord out, it makes more sense to call it #11, but I guess #4 wouldn't technically be wrong. You'll just get weird looks if you put it on a chart.
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