#1
the next pedal i want to invest in would be a looper, however i have a few questions i would like to ask about them, that hopefully someone who has had experience with loopers could answer.
the way i imagine loopers work (on a basic level) would be that the signal that comes from the guitar is recorded and then played back by the pedal over and over with the signal being sent to the amp.
if this is the case is it not possible to change from clean to overdrive channels without it affecting previously recorded loops? e.g. say i want to record a clean chord progression and then dub over it with some overdriven riffs, would this be possible?
the only way i can see round it would be if a pedal is put before the looper in the chain, or the different effect comes from the the pedal itself e.g. some sort of multi-effect.

on top of that could some looper pedal owners reccomend some cheaper (round the £100 mark or as close as possible) looper pedals and their pros/cons

if it matters i usually play bluesy to hard rock stuff and my gear is in my sig

thanks
schnips
#3
Quote by bartdevil_metal
Yes, it's possible. Definitley possible.

http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/en/rc20-xl/13066


thanks for the help and the recomendation

but i dont really get how the pedal knows what you are doing to alter the sound AFTER the signal has passed through the pedal, i mean for all the pedal knows both the layers could be clean or overdriven whatever (if im still making sense) as it would be the amp altering the signal

if you are able to explain this to me it would be greatly appreciated, if you dont know then thank you anyway
#4
Ok, I'll (try to) explain.

The pedal's in your effects loop, you play the riff or whatever, then you press something that writes the recording (I don't actually own one of these but I've seen it done). You then press play (or whatever) and play over it, or record again and record another riff. So it actually saves the sound like a microphone would to memory and sends that out again and again.

Sorry that was vague, hope it helped.
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#5
To further clarify, since it's in the loop the overdrive comes before it assuming preamp distortion so the previously recorded stuff won't get distorted.
#6
Quote by bartdevil_metal
Ok, I'll (try to) explain.

The pedal's in your effects loop, you play the riff or whatever, then you press something that writes the recording (I don't actually own one of these but I've seen it done). You then press play (or whatever) and play over it, or record again and record another riff. So it actually saves the sound like a microphone would to memory and sends that out again and again.

Sorry that was vague, hope it helped.



aaahh i get it i think the important thing i missed was that it was meant to go into the effects loop inbetween the pre amp and the power amp(??) the rest about the recording like a mic i get

thanks
#7
Quote by ameer
To further clarify, since it's in the loop the overdrive comes before it assuming preamp distortion so the previously recorded stuff won't get distorted.


Thanks for picking up the pieces I missed .
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#9
Out of the loop... It is most common for effects such as compression, distortion, overdrive, and wah to be placed between the guitar and the amp. Placing a compression unit in the effects-loop doesn't work because compression is meant to effect the over-all signal. Delays, chorus-phase modulators, and reverbs should be plugged into the amp's effects-loop (if provided). The effects-loop acts like a separate effects-channel in that it mixes the effect with the original signal.

The pedals between the guitar and the amp often react better with the level and dynamic range from the guitars pick-ups and act as boosters (both tonally and in volume). A compressor at the front can help to even out volume and increase the sustain while a distortion/overdrive pedal can boost the gain. A good wah pedal can boost the treble and allow you to adjust your phase. A mono enhancer can also boost the treble to a point where old strings sound like new (a cheap trick- so buy new strings).

In the loop... Try placing the delay before a modulation unit such as a chorus or flanger. This way, the echos will continue to modulate and sound different with each repeat. The delay after the modulation can cause phase cancellations that can create ugly side effects such as making your signal weaker and stronger on its own at all the wrong times. The reverb unit should always be placed last in the lineup. Located below are a few pointers regarding setup of different effect types.

From: http://www.hotfrets.com/tipDetail.asp?id=34