#1
I'm looking to get a new amp,

(looking between the
Crate V5

Blackheart BH5H

and

BH5-112 )

when I realized I don't understand the difference between a cab and head and a combo.

For example, is there an advantage to getting a 5 watt Blackheart combo to a 5 watt Blackheart stack with the same specs?

Same goes for the epiphone valve junior combo compared to the Valve junior stack.

Can someone explain? (By the way, amp recommendations GREATLY appreciated. Looking for powerful 80s metal/hair metal tones and decent cleans.)
My current ghetto setup:

Crate VC508 (Needs new speaker and pots BADLEY.)
Fender R15
Peavey T-60
Original LPB-1
BBE Sonic Maximizer (rack)
#2
the main advantage (apart from looking awesome) is mixing speaker combos easily.

in bigger amps, its easier to transport, and of course, youre pushing more air with a 412. but its prolly harder to move a VJ stack
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#3
A powerful 80's metal sound through a 5w stack? ...come again?

But yeah a cab is good if you want to mix stuff, and a combo is a bit more portable. But a big combo can wheih a lot, and a stack can be divided into to lighter parts to carry around. But it does take up more place when you put it back together.
#4
if you get a head thats just the amplifier you also need a cabinet with speakers for the amp to drive, a combo has both the amplifier and the speakers built in. A stack is a head and a cabinet sold together
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#5
Quote by the sticky

Heads, Cabs, and Combo's

Amps generally come in two forms, heads and combo's.

An amp head consists of a preamp and a power amp. It does not produce sound on it's own. In order for it to produce sound, you will need to connect it to a cab.

A cab is simply an enclosure for speakers, usually in a 4x12, 4x10, or 2x12 speaker configuration.

A combo has a built in preamp, power amp, and speaker. Some combo's also come with a cab out, so you can connect them to cabs when needed. Most combo's have one single speaker, though it is not uncommon to see combo's with a 2x12 or 4x10 or 4x12 setup.

Basically, the more speaker surface are you have, the more air is pushed, and therefore you will sound louder. So a 30w head will sound louder through two 4x12 cabs than through one 2x12 cab. (2x12 means that the cab contains two 12 inch speakers.)

You can connect a head to oone cab, or to two. When it is connected to one cab, it is a half stack. When connected to two, it is a full stack.

Connecting a combo to a cab is a good way to increase volume for a gig, though most of the time a 30w tube 1x12 combo will suffice. As long as you can hear yourself, the PA will do the rest of the work. Using a wall of full stacks (Or even half stacks in smaller venues.) isn't a great way to project your sound because it will simply be too loud on stage. You will get hearing damage, and it will be hard to create a balance. I can't stress it enough, don't buy the biggest amp you can afford, get something that will be loud enough and not louder. It may be cool to have a wall or Marshall's behind you, but you won't think so when you have to lug them around and when you have ear problems. We're all musicians, we should protect our ears like we protect our di<e>cks.

..
#6
Quote by druz15_UG
if you get a head thats just the amplifier you also need a cabinet with speakers for the amp to drive, a combo has both the amplifier and the speakers built in.


If it wasn't clear, I get that much. Head and cab are separate, I know. (Thanks anyway.)

Quote by Aziraphale
A powerful 80's metal sound through a 5w stack? ...come again?


I'm new to this- sue me. However, since I just play in a garage band, wouldn't a 5 watt tube with a distortion pedal work?

And I missed that sticky some how... oops. However, the combo and stack have the same speaker surface..

So looking at these posts, I must ask:

Aside from looking much more badass, is there really any reason to get the stack over the combo with a speaker out?

Do I even need to use additional cabs with 5 watt tube amp?

Any suggestions for the amp? 8D
My current ghetto setup:

Crate VC508 (Needs new speaker and pots BADLEY.)
Fender R15
Peavey T-60
Original LPB-1
BBE Sonic Maximizer (rack)
#7
You play in a garage band? Tell me that you don't have a drummer. If you do, you might look again. 5W against a drum set, the drum set wins.
Current Rig:
Splawn Quickrod
Marshall 1960BX
Electrics:
Les Paul with Dirty Fingers
Kramer
Acoustics:
Hohner
Ibanez
Pedals:
Isp Decimator
Cry Baby Wah
MXR MX108 10 Band EQ.
BBE Green Screamer
#8
^

+1

If you're playing in a garage band, you'll probably want something more powerful than a 5watt tube amp.

At the VERY least, 15watts depending on how loud your band/drummer is. Best/safer bet would be a 30watt tube amp.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#9
Quote by Hakael
^

+1

If you're playing in a garage band, you'll probably want something more powerful than a 5watt tube amp.

At the VERY least, 15watts depending on how loud your band/drummer is. Best/safer bet would be a 30watt tube amp.



Totally. Here is a great example. Fast forward to 5:20 in this video. It's for Orange amps. They try them out, but at 5:20 they use the Tiny Terror. Well they have it cranked at 7 watts and cranked at 15. Listen to the drums over the guitar at 15 watts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-PHqs4zBAc&NR=1
Current Rig:
Splawn Quickrod
Marshall 1960BX
Electrics:
Les Paul with Dirty Fingers
Kramer
Acoustics:
Hohner
Ibanez
Pedals:
Isp Decimator
Cry Baby Wah
MXR MX108 10 Band EQ.
BBE Green Screamer
#10
Quote by Thelastrilo

I'm new to this- sue me. However, since I just play in a garage band, wouldn't a 5 watt tube with a distortion pedal work?


I didn't mean to come of as an ass, what I'm getting at is that 5w is nothing once you get drums into the picture. It might work in your bedroom for practicing scales and stuff but like some guys said go for at least 30w-ish for band rehearsals/gigs. Better safe than sorry, you never know when you might need even more volume.

I honestly didn't even know there were tube amps as small as 5w.
#11
Quote by Aziraphale
I didn't mean to come of as an ass, what I'm getting at is that 5w is nothing once you get drums into the picture. It might work in your bedroom for practicing scales and stuff but like some guys said go for at least 30w-ish for band rehearsals/gigs. Better safe than sorry, you never know when you might need even more volume.

I honestly didn't even know there were tube amps as small as 5w.

i never thought i'd say this but, fail.

5 watt could keep up with a drummer when cranked, but it's not loud enough in a full band situation.

it's too loud for the bedroom most fo the times.
30 watts wil get you clean headroom in a full band, so 15 watts is fine if you don't need much cleans.

there's even a 1 watter. and a 0.5 watter too i believe.
#12
Quote by Hakael
At the VERY least, 15watts depending on how loud your band/drummer is. Best/safer bet would be a 30watt tube amp.


+1

15W would be the bare minimum, 30W would be a lot better (especially if you have any interest in playing clean).

The Palomino V16 is a decent, cheap, 15W amp. The new Crate V18 is worth looking into, too. For the price of those amps new, though, you should be able to find a Peavey Classic 30 that could cover all your needs.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#13
Quote by The red Strat.
i never thought i'd say this but, fail.

5 watt could keep up with a drummer when cranked, but it's not loud enough in a full band situation.


Not with my drummer dude Maybe if you play laid back jazz or blues but once the tempos get a bit faster the drums will as a result be louder (unless you're using brushes or something). And well he was indeed going to use it in a garage band so it would be a full band situation.

Bottom line: 5w isn't a great idea. Like someone said, it's like eating pizza with a straw, it might work but it won't be that satisfactory.
#14
pizza with a straw, thats interesting
Gear
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
Ibanez EX 470 (1991)

Peavey 6505 combo
Vox Valvetronix AD15VT
Danville 1X12 Cab
Kustom 12w tube

Dunlop Crybaby
DOD overdrive(YJM)
Boss Ns-2
PodXt
Dod 250 Overdrive
#15
i heard one time that a 5 watt tube amp is as loud as a trumpet, and a trumpet can easily be heard over a drumset. However, you will have to push your amp as hard as you can all the time, and you will not get any cleans at all. So i will concur and tell you to get at the very least, a 15 watt amp.
#16
Even 15 watts is not a guarantee it will be loud enough. If you listen to the Orange clip I posted, you will hear what I am talking about.
Current Rig:
Splawn Quickrod
Marshall 1960BX
Electrics:
Les Paul with Dirty Fingers
Kramer
Acoustics:
Hohner
Ibanez
Pedals:
Isp Decimator
Cry Baby Wah
MXR MX108 10 Band EQ.
BBE Green Screamer