#1
EDIT: Pics in second post

I've got this old Antares that's been sitting around my house for as long as anyone can remember. Nobody in my family even knows where it came from. It had sat in the basement for a few years, then various rooms around the house, being picked up maybe once in a couple of months, strummed for a few minutes then put down again. It's had the same strings for all these years, and I'm even pretty sure that they are actually electric guitar strings.

It's an Antares and the sticker inside says it was made in Korea, it's a model DE 14 and the serial number is 881200219. I don't know what kind of wood it's made of, I will have pictures up in a little while if I can, my digital camera has a broken screen and also the batteries are dead.

I know my way around an electric guitar very well, but I don't know much about care and maintenance of an acoustic. Somewhere in its travels a piece of the bridge saddle chipped off, on the high E side, just past where the string is. Luckily it's a small chip and the string is still in place and works fine. But it appears to me that the tension is pulling/bending the rest of the saddle towards the headstock, and I imagine if it gets any worse the rest of it might break.

I'm also not happy with the nut, which looks like it may have been replaced some time many years ago, poorly.

And finally, I'm wondering if I could replace the tuners with something of higher quality, though this is not urgent.

Don't tell me to take it to a shop because there are none where I live. My biggest concern is the bridge saddle and I need to know how to replace it. Also I'm just wondering if someone can help me figure out what kind of wood it's made of and whether I can upgrade the tuners.
Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

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Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
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Last edited by Schneiderman at Feb 15, 2008,
#2
Here's pictures, forgive the bad quality, my regular camera is broken so I had to use a Flip Video camera and take still shots.





Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

Quote by The_Paranoia

Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
Go Schneiderman!

Gun Facts: Educate Yourself
#3
you can the replace the tuners but just make sure the wood doesn't sound like it would break if you knocked on it. also switch those strings!
Last edited by sebisbest at Feb 15, 2008,
#4
are those screws I see in the fingerboard? on like the 20 fret? also do you mean the whole bridge or the just the saddle. cause if it's just the saddle you can take it off while the strings are taken off..
Last edited by sebisbest at Feb 15, 2008,
#5
Quote by sebisbest
are those screws I see in the fingerboard? on like the 20 fret?


Yeah, there's screws there. I was confused by that too.

And I just got strings for it today then realized that the saddle needed attention so I'm holding off on changing the strings until I fix the saddle.
Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

Quote by The_Paranoia

Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
Go Schneiderman!

Gun Facts: Educate Yourself
#6
As far as the saddle goes if you take all the strings off it should just pull right out unless its glued in. However i dont know if it is a standard size so replacing it may be a little tricky if its not basically you wanna make sure the string height and length is the same so your action and intonation are the same. This may require taking the strings on and off for and checking your action as you sand down the new saddle the best way is to loosen the strings alot then putting a capo on fret ten to hold the strings in place whilst you fiddle with the saddle then put the new saddle in place replace strings and bridge pins and retune take off capo and check action/intonatoin then repeat as neccesary just make sure you sand the bottom of the saddle on a flat level surface so you remove the material evenly.
I would look it up on frets for a walk through those guys are alot smarter and skilled in guitar repair than me. Good luck and happy strumming.
#7
Thanks, that was very helpful. If anyone else has advice I'll be checking back here tomorrow.
Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

Quote by The_Paranoia

Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
Go Schneiderman!

Gun Facts: Educate Yourself