#1
Well, this was an idea i got some time ago; I had just restrung my classical guitar and i had left it be for some time. It detuned to nearly C; I'd been listening to a lot of Evens stuff, so i detuned the whole guitar to B standard (most Baritones use B or A) and played it for a while. Sounded great.

So I bought a new Classical guitar yesterday; and i wondered whether i could make my old one into a Baritone. I would have to file out the stringholders on the head, and probably adjust the bridge a bit. Common Baritones are tuned to A D G C E A as opposed to E A D G B E, basically a fifth down. So i figured i would probably use, from top to bottom:

A - 5th string of a normal guitar tuned down
E - A 4th string ( D ) tuned up a tone
C - 4th string of normal guitar ( D ) tuned down
G - thickness of 1st string of bass ( G )
D - thickness of 2nd string of bass ( D )
A - thickness of 3rd string of bass ( A )

Would this be feasable? The main doubt is whether the plastic tuning knobs of a Classical would be able to handle the tension of bass strings. Whether it would damage the guitar using strings that heavy on those plastic tuners. Would the guitar be able to handle it?

Any advice would be appreciated.
#3
That might damage the neck. I'm not really sure how much tension the bass strings will end up putting on the neck.
#4
If you can find baritone strings for a classical guitar, I would be surprised.

Regarding the bridge. Don't move it. It will ruin your intonation, and your strings will always be out of tune with each other.
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#5
Quote by Will_Minus
If you can find baritone strings for a classical guitar, I would be surprised.

Regarding the bridge. Don't move it. It will ruin your intonation, and your strings will always be out of tune with each other.



On second thoughts, i doubt i'd be moving the bridge. You can't find baritone strings for a classical guitar, so i guess i'd have to improvise with acoustic bass strings and the lower strings of a normal acoustic. Unfortunately, i highly doubt the neck (as mentioned above) would be able to take the strain.
#6
Maybe you could take off the fretboard, and reinforce the neck with carbon fiber rods. Then put your fretboard back on.
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#7
I doubt it will work. Even accounting that the scale length for a classical guitar is less than a baritone or bass, so the strings won't be at full tension, the tension difference is huge.

It depends on what strings you use, and if you are really picky and get the lowest possible tension you can for each string, you will still end up probably doubling the tension on the neck. Classical guitar strings are something like 5-9 pounds per string if I remember correctly. Bass and baritone guitar strings are somewhere around 15-30 pounds per string. Considering the guitar probably wasn't made to accommodate much more than heavier classical strings, reinforcing short of probably close to practically a full rebuild probably won't work.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to find strings deep enough with a small enough amount of tension, I didn't exactly scour every string out there. However, I would say it would be much easier and straightforward just to buy a baritone guitar.
#8
^ He's probably right. And even if you manage to reinforce the neck suitably for the heavier strings.. the body will most likely cave in when you start tuning up
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#9
The neck isnt your problem. Its the top. Its not designed for the 60-70kgs of tension that a steel string guitar pulls on the bridge, its designed for 20kgs of tension. So, that will just warp.
Then, to have a baritone, you need a longer scale length. You'll need to totally replace the fretboard, and install new frets, to get the correct scale length. This will mean also moving the bridge... a bridge that is designed to sit in a very specific place, to allow the correct transfer of sound vibrations through the top. Moving it will kill that. Not to mention the risk of damaging the top when you remove the bridge.

You are basically wanting to turn a car into a motorbike. Sure, some crazy mad inventor COULD do it. But he'd be wasting his time and effort, only to have something which performs well below average.

Just buy some ultra high tension classical strings, and see how they work for you.

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Perry Ormsby

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