#1
just wondering how do you get intentional feedback, and control it and make sure it sounds rite and such...

is there a pedal you can get?

cheers
#2
If you use a high gain amp or pedal, it should be doable. It is difficult to control but the only way to really learn is trial and error.
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#3
You just move your guitar closer to your amp. And if you have an OD you can get feedback much easier and louder.
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#4
i see

but if you listen to Buffalo Head by the Features...basically i really want one of my bands songs to end like it but wouldnt know how to go about it...
#6
Make sure you experience different places, try moving your guitar from different angles and such to achieve different harmonic feedbacks, I always do it on my guitar!
#7
I find it's harder to do with solid state amps. Whether it was anything to do with the amps in question i do not know. However what i tend to do is roll the volume down to zero, fret G on the low E string, and apply some really wide vibrato at a relatively high speed, pluck, then roll the volume back up. It starts to happen eventually. You should be standing close to the amp.
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#8
Solid state feedback is horrible anyway, it's the last thing you want to be hearing. All you need for feedback is volume, it's simple physics. You need the amp loud enough so that the sound waves it produces are powerful enough to perpetuate the vibration of the strings. It doesn't matter how much gain you have, if it's not loud enough then there won't be enough energy in the sound waves to transmit to the strings.
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#9
I exploit feedback quite a bit and it seems that the key to obtaining feedback is volume; but that really doesn't mean a thing because uncontrolled feedback doesn't have much use.
Distortion/overdrive determines the clarity of the feedback; a loud pickup selector also produces feedback. The notes you're fretting will affect the tone of the feedback and is ultimately key to getting the kind of feedback you want. Tapping the body of your guitar with the pick can also produce interesting effects.
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#11
theres a big thread on this so use the searchbar

Oh and intentional feedback.
Sustainer
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Use huge volume to vibrate your strings like a sustainer.
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#12
umm whats feedback?? lol im serious
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#13
Boss DF-2 is a feedback pedal that was discontinued in the 90's or 80's. i forget which. you can buy them on ebay for around 100 bucks. Theres one guy on youtube who did a sound test for it and he goes over it pretty well.
#15
When I'm trying to get a nice feedback-y thing going on, I crouch down right in front of my amp, and try to keep my pickups as close to the speaker as I can.
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#16
Quote by maggotforlife42
umm whats feedback?? lol im serious

Feedback is a generally unwanted 'squeal' sound that you get when your input is picking up your output. You often hear it when someone speaks into a microphone when the mic is picking up sound from its own speakers. It's used in electric guitar sometimes intentionally to get a buzzing-squeally sound.

I'm no sound technician so I can't explain it very technically.
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#17
Fernandes Sustainer. You can get sustained feedback and its a lot easier to control because it feeds back the note your fretting. Check them out. Kerry King from slayer uses them, steve vai.
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#19
Technically feedback is just the output, in some capacity, going into the input again. THe high-pitched squeal that you get from putting your guitar next to your amp is just a feedback loop.
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#20
Stand with your guitar parallel to your amp. Standing perpendicular to it greatly reduces feedback. So to gain some kind of control over it, you can twist and tilt the angle of your body to the amp according to the amount of feedback you want.

There's obviously a lot more to it than that, but that's one of the basics in feedback control.
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#21
can anyone give me the name of a good sustain/feedback pedal...

i tried ebay but if you type in sustain pedal all you get is piano-y sustain pedals

i know someone mentioned the DF-2, but these seem quite hard to come by

thanks
#23
HARMONICS!!1 well lightly touch strings anywhere and beat the living lights our of them
#24
I saw Dave Mustaine live getting that feedback thing in the little Peace Sells solos by standing close to his amp and pulling his headstock towards him.. Looked weird but definitely worked.
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#26
Depending on the guitar, flip it to whatever pup feeds back the best, and aim it at the speaker cone's center. Twiddle your knbos and switches and play with your trem, or even do some bends/neck bends to get a little extra manipulations out of it.
#27
Quote by antroolez
ah the old GAK....hadn't even considered it!

None of those pedals will help one bit unless you have an amp that's inherently capable of nice feedback, usually tube as solid state feedback sounds awful and is usually uncontrollable. You also need to be playing at a high enough volume to create sympathetic vibrations. You can't just buy a pedal and "make" feedback, satisfy the first two conditions first, THEN if you're still struggling you can think about pedals.
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#28
Quote by steven seagull
Solid state feedback is horrible anyway, it's the last thing you want to be hearing.


That's not true all the time, I hear some great feedback out of solid state amps, but I do hear a lot of screeching **** too.
#29
alright thanks for the advice, i do have a tube amp....so i'll try it.


weren't the ones on that GAK site sustain pedals?

i want to get the sound i dont know if anyone knows, on the creedence clearwater revival cover of I put a spell on you...

i want to know how he does this thing during the solo...it's like he picks a note, then it lasts ****in ages while he just rebends it for ages...but it doesn't sound like he re-picks at all....i always thought it was a sustain pedal....

thanks
#33
Quote by antroolez
can anyone give me the name of a good sustain/feedback pedal...

i tried ebay but if you type in sustain pedal all you get is piano-y sustain pedals

i know someone mentioned the DF-2, but these seem quite hard to come by

thanks


http://cgi.ebay.com/Boss-DF-2-Super-Feedbacker-Distortion_W0QQitemZ280204393189QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item280204393189&_trksid=p3285.c57.l1288
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