#1
If so, Im getting really tired and tight in my right shoulder fast...

Just something I need to get used to?
#2
Work on it slower, and make sure the picking motion is coming from the wrist, string changing from the forearm. Also be aware of your shoulder, if it gets tense or goes up, stop, relax, breath and start again slower when your fine again. Don't forget to breath while your playing too.
#3
^ well your hand can touch it, it inevitably will. its when you press a finger or 2 down on the body to hold your hand steady and in place b/c yer not able to without it. basically listen to what diminishedtobme said. take it REAL slow. i decided to stop anchoring after about 10 or 11 years of playing (almost a year ago now) and in the beginning i SUCKED HARD, i had to go ridiculously slow and i sounded like atotal guitar n00b. but i kept at it and it took a little while to get back up to speed (approx 3 months for me, but dont gauge yourself by me or vice versa as everyones different) but since then my playing has improved and is quite a bit cleaner.
#4
I'm not really sure. I don't anchor, but I rest the palm of my picking hand lightly on the guitar. It doesn't really hinder me as far as I can tell, but it feels more natural and comfortable.
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#5
Quote by Sonicxlover
I'm not really sure. I don't anchor, but I rest the palm of my picking hand lightly on the guitar. It doesn't really hinder me as far as I can tell, but it feels more natural and comfortable.


Do you rest to get stability or for muting purposes? If you do it for stability it anchoring to a degree.
#6
I have my forearm kind of resting on my guitar, and my palm brushes the strings, but I don't really thing that counts as anchoring. Does it?
#7
Wow, I never knew it wasn't good. I've always anchored a finger or two down on the body/strings I'm not using, I never thought about it. It's just easier, more comfortable, especially when I'm palm muting...
#8
I always practice with my hand floating above the strings, but whet when it comes to preforming or improvising i rest my hand on the strings for stability
#9
Quote by diminishedtobme
Do you rest to get stability or for muting purposes? If you do it for stability it anchoring to a degree.


Well I guess it is mainly for stability, but it does help me palm mute.
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Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.

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Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.

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#10
You should only have your fingers or palm on the strings near the bridge for muting purposes. At least thats what I was taught. My teacher considered anything other than that anchoring and promoted to my arms to always be loose and at rest.
#11
Quote by Galvanise69
yeah, i guess I was lucky enough to have people telling from the start that placing your fingers onto the guitar body was wrong, but trust me, youll play better and more easily once you do get it sorted.


its not wrong if your fingers touch the body of the guitar. its also normal for the arm to rest on the guitar.


just look at any good guitar player. To keep it in the realm of what you guys are probably interested in. watch this Paul Gilbert video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPGA3vjMLgE


notice that while he does choose the closed hand posture.... his arm DOES infact rest on the guitar.... it is not being held above the guitar.

Steve Vai:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Xan1YX2NDk

hand open and relaxed with some fingers occasionally touching the guitar..... arm rests on guitar.


This is the standard way of playing..... most players play like that.


some more examples:






Theres really a big misconception being promoted here about it being WRONG to touch the guitar with the picking hand or arm. its far from reality. Just watch and listen to the really good players. You can learn alot from that.

try watching this guy..... hes one of the most respected players by people here at UG. He is always mentioned as being one of the best players.... notice his arm does rest on the guitar.... and his fingers also touch.


Guthrie Govan


they key thing that makes anchoring bad is ....... the anchoring.. Touching the guitar is not bad.....the thing to avoid is fixing your hand to the guitar to the point that it limits the movement of your hand. this bad habit is something that alot of novice guitar players are guilty of.... it should in no way be confused with the posture that you see by professional players, and really has nothing to do with "advanced" or "techniques"..... it has more to do with "bad habits to avoid when starting to learn to play the guitar", a topic that really belongs in a "novice" section.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 5, 2008,
#12
^I agree with all that you just said, but the thing is lots of teachers think its ok to anchor, so many of beginners pick up the habit. Then when they reach a barrier in their playing they ask here and find out their anchoring is holding the back, and usually they would have been playing for years or months and the habit would be very ingrained in their playing, so it takes tons of effort and work into getting out of it. Anchoring wouldn't seem bad to a beginner since the stuff they practice is easy so it appears to be the right way, but as they go on to harder stuff they'll find that it gets more difficult to play while anchoring.
#13
Quote by diminishedtobme
^I agree with all that you just said, but the thing is lots of teachers think its ok to anchor, so many of beginners pick up the habit. Then when they reach a barrier in their playing they ask here and find out their anchoring is holding the back, and usually they would have been playing for years or months and the habit would be very ingrained in their playing, so it takes tons of effort and work into getting out of it. Anchoring wouldn't seem bad to a beginner since the stuff they practice is easy so it appears to be the right way, but as they go on to harder stuff they'll find that it gets more difficult to play while anchoring.



I dont think its really fair to blame it on guitar teachers. Sure there may be a few here and there, but keep in mind the student is a factor as well . Some students just dont listen, no matter how many times you tell them. Then a few years later...... its the teachers fault. but thats a whole different issue in itself.

This issue is about people perpetuating the idea that resting the arm on the guitar, and or playing with the hand open where the fingers touch the guitar is wrong in any way. I think its important to clearly define anchoring for what it is, and not perpetuate any misleading ideas.
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#15
My hand floats right above the strings (a millimeter or two closer and it would be touching) when I'm picking on the high strings (E,B,G), but when I am palm muting at the bass strings my hand/palm kind of lowers a bit to palm mute. It's still considered floating when you're slightly touching for palm muting purposes, right?
#16
Quote by fixationdarknes
My hand floats right above the strings (a millimeter or two closer and it would be touching) when I'm picking on the high strings (E,B,G), but when I am palm muting at the bass strings my hand/palm kind of lowers a bit to palm mute. It's still considered floating when you're slightly touching for palm muting purposes, right?


why would that be considered floating? ..... its palm muting.

what your doing is standard. palm above the strings when not muting.... let it touch the strings to mute. simple basic technique. its the same whether you play with the hand open or closed. Even if you anchored, you would still mute the same way.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 6, 2008,
#18
Quote by fixationdarknes
So that is considered good technique then? I just don't want to compromise my playing abilities just to palm mute if there's another way to do this.


palm muting by muting the strings with your palm? how could that be considered bad technique? thats how its done. Your abilities will not be compromised by resting your palm on the strings to mute.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 6, 2008,
#19
I kinda sorta anchor, like my pinky is touching the guitar most of the time, but it moves around with my hand, I don't just leave it in one spot, that's not anchoring is it?

But when I play standing up I anchor, unless it's a really easy song or one I know so good I could in the dark while I'm drunk after I've been up for 24 hours. especially when I'm really just having fun and not paying much attention to my technique I anchor, but I don't even realize at the time. And I don't know what to do about that... practice playing while standing more?
#20
Quote by GuitarMunky
palm muting by muting the strings with your palm? how could that be considered bad technique? thats how its done. Your abilities will not be compromised by resting your palm on the strings to mute.


Alright, so when resting your palm on the strings to mute and to mute only, then that is considered very light yet necessary anchoring right? Resting your palm on the strings just for the sake of stability would then be considered heavier unnecessary anchoring then?

Sorry for all the questions; just curious. Thanks for the help so far.
#21
Quote by fixationdarknes
Alright, so when resting your palm on the strings to mute and to mute only, then that is considered very light yet necessary anchoring right? Resting your palm on the strings just for the sake of stability would then be considered heavier unnecessary anchoring then?

Sorry for all the questions; just curious. Thanks for the help so far.



well it has nothing to do with anchoring whatsoever. Palm muting is a technique, that produces a particular sound. its done by muting the strings with your palm.
I had a feeling you were hung up on the anchoring thing. It really shows how misleading the threads here on the subject have been.


on the subject of anchoring:

people make way to much out of the resting for stability idea. The real problem is pressing your fingers. (putting pressure on them) to the point where it limits the movement of your hand. Just touching the guitar is not a problem at all. The "anchoring is bad" concept is really overstated here in this forum. I think it often has a detrimental effect to be honest. People tend to over focus on it, and have the misconception that touching the guitar with the picking hand at all is anchoring...... its not.


if you look at some of the pics I posted earlier in the thread.... you can clearly see that all 3 of those highly regarded players let their fingers touch the guitar.... AND rest their arms on the guitar ( like most guitarists). They are amazing players, and are not anchoring.
heres the pics again:







look at the hands on all 3 of these guys. You dont really think their playing ability is compromised do you?


Anyway Im glad to help Im sure there will be some more opinions on the anchoring thing.... but I dont think anyone will disagree about palm muting.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 7, 2008,
#22
Alright thanks dude. I just let my hand be completely relaxed and my fingers do touch the guitar lightly but move up and down when I'm changing strings. I find it would cause more tension to lift them off the guitar than to just let them lightly touch, so I'm glad you cleared that up for me. You rock. =)
#23
when i play my guitar, i used to rest my picking hand on the bridge, is that wrong? im using an electric guitar
#24
Like I said in another thread, some people worry WAY too much about whether their technique is "correct". Play whatever way is comfortable. Concentrate on expressing your emotions, not on whether some douchebag on UG approves of your technique! As has been previously posted, many of the vaunted guitar gods are known to anchor in some way. Can't be all that bad. It doesn't seem to hold Steve Vai back at his current level of playing. Since neither me nor ANY of you will ever approach his level, I guess a little anchoring will never hinder us either. Think about it.