#1
is there any difference between play a bar of 9/4 followed by a bar of 7/4 and playing 4 bars of 4/4.
#2
In total they have the same number of notes, but they are subdivided differently. They will sound significantly different. Keep in mind that you will rarely see something like 9/4 without it being subdivided even further (e.g. a bar of 4/4 followed by a bar of 5/4 (which may be further broken down into a bar of 3/4 followed by a bar of 2/4), or three bars of 3/4, etc)

I find it much easier to describe the exact way that the beat is subdivided than just stating the overall time signature. For instance, instead of writing 7/4, I may write the time signature as 4+3/4 to indicate the way that each note is emphasized (ONE two three four ONE two three...)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Feb 17, 2008,
#3
Quote by Archeo Avis
In total they have the same number of notes, but they are subdivided differently. They will sound significantly different. Keep in mind that you will rarely see something like 9/4 without it being subdivided even further (e.g. a bar of 4/4 followed by a bar of 5/4 (which may be further broken down into a bar of 3/4 followed by a bar of 2/4), or three bars of 3/4, etc)

I find it much easier to describe the exact way that the beat is subdivided than just stating the overall time signature. For instance, instead of writing 7/4, I may write the time signature as 4+3/4 to indicate the way that each note is emphasized (ONE two three four ONE two three...)

It is a lot easier to think of them broken up into smaller time signatures like that. Thanks for the help.
#4
Quote by quinny1089
well 9/4 is compound time for starters, so in that bar the emphasis' are goin to be divided into 3s, and its not the same as a bar of 5/4 and 4/4...


I would've thought that all depended on how the notes were grouped really. If it was divided into 3s what's to stop it just being 3/4?
#5
Quote by quinny1089
well 9/4 is compound time for starters, so in that bar the emphasis' are goin to be divided into 3s, and its not the same as a bar of 5/4 and 4/4...

its compound because the top number is divisible by 3 (yet is not 3 itself.)

in compound the beats fall in groups of 3 notes

so 9/4 will be 3 groups of 3 notes:

|123 123 123|

with the 1s being the pulses (or strong beats.)

the emphasis in the 7/4 bar can fall in a number of places, 2-5, or 3-4 or 4-3, or 5-2...

so there can be alot of variance in the way the music flows and the rhythm n groove between the 4\4s n 9/4 n 7/4


9/8 can function as both compound time signature, and a complex time signature. As a compound time signature the beats would be (1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9). In complex time it can be grouped as (1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9), (1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9), (1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9), or (1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9).