#1
Ok, well after not playing bass since early December, i have decided to play again. Shortly after I started playing I realized why I loved the instrument. I am fairly decent. There are still many things I would like to learn in bass techniques and music itself.
I know a few people that are great at guitar and in my music class (we learn about passed bands and styles of music than once a month we play to the decade that we're studying) I always hear them just jamming and showing eachother new stuff they've created and it sounds great. Then they get into the technical names as of major and minor penatonic, chromatic, modes, arpeggios, ect., and I get confused about "What distinguishes between each?" I've tried asking, but they themselves don't know and just play with the knowledge itself and just memorize music.

I am aware of keys, I know the whole whole half set up to the keys, and I know that arpeggios are chords that the notes are played one at a time instead of simultainously. And the chromatic scale is every note, like the chromatic scale of E would be everything from E open to 12th fret E.
(i could be wrong.)


But are theyre any tricks to remember what is a major or a minor penatonic? I've heard the "one sounds happier and the other one sounds like deep and depressed." kind of explaination, but to me it doesn't work.

What exactly is a mode?
I get confused about all the different termonologies how to distinguish between the two.

If there is any other information that is considered "YOU MUST LEARN THIS!" just let me know.
Thanks to anyone that could help.
#2
I know minimal music theory. I find it easier to write songs in my head, where i know it will sound good, and then transfer it onto the guitar. There is nothing that you NEED learn really, well thats what I think.
#3
its kinda hard to distinguish by ear, unless you have perfect pitch. If you learn the modes, you can distinguish by looking at music
I had to get a replacement after I broke my G string. What a pain in the ass!
#4
if you think of music like math, each note has a numerical value in relation to another, on piano for example, for a chord, people ususally count whole and halfs, on guitars we count frets for each string. so for in a scale, there are (depending on what kind of scale or mode, etc) a certain number of notes. for a minor and major, fifths, etc, there is a certain change. "fifth note is a half step up", etc. so once you learn the pattern for the major scale, its just a matter of determining what differences are and where. thats how i learn. i don't have a specific example off of the top of my head, i'm still memorizing. there are lots of "music for dummies", "bass for dummies", etc that explain this same concept of applying math to music. it really is very mathematical, and i learn better that way so once i figured this out it has helped a lot. like about a year's worth of playing now all has come together in learning this once concept. if all else fails, GOOGLE IT!
#5
thanks

All I've been doing is learning scales, but I don't understand what they are. I don't mean I don't know what a scale is because I do. I just don't get why one would be a certain termonology over another (for example why it would be a mode or being major or minor, or even what makes a scale penatonic.) or there other types of scales rather than penatonic?

Would a mode be playing within a key, but playing something else? That's alittle vague so I'll give an example. If the key was G would only B and D be modes since they are the 3rd and 5th or is it any note in the scale can be a mode?
Last edited by Crazy Horse at Feb 17, 2008,
#6
Quote by patrickhatch
if you think of music like math, each note has a numerical value in relation to another, on piano for example, for a chord, people ususally count whole and halfs, on guitars we count frets for each string. so for in a scale, there are (depending on what kind of scale or mode, etc) a certain number of notes. for a minor and major, fifths, etc, there is a certain change. "fifth note is a half step up", etc. so once you learn the pattern for the major scale, its just a matter of determining what differences are and where. thats how i learn. i don't have a specific example off of the top of my head, i'm still memorizing. there are lots of "music for dummies", "bass for dummies", etc that explain this same concept of applying math to music. it really is very mathematical, and i learn better that way so once i figured this out it has helped a lot. like about a year's worth of playing now all has come together in learning this once concept. if all else fails, GOOGLE IT!


Thank you, that's basically what i was asking, basic ways of remembering stuff that brings it all together. I'll go look for "bass for dummies" next time I'm out. I've tried googling, but most websites I've found give the structure, but not a way to remember what is what and seems to be more memorizing what scale you learn and what it is rather than memorizing the scale and understand why that scale is what it is.
#7
Quote by Crazy Horse
thanks

All I've been doing is learning scales, but I don't understand what they are. I don't mean I don't know what a scale is because I do. I just don't get why one would be a certain termonology over another (for example why it would be a mode or being major or minor, or even what makes a scale penatonic.) or there other types of scales rather than penatonic?


you jsut named 3 different scales

a major scale is a different type than a pentatonic

a major is a different type than a minor

there is the keys to worry about then what scale your doing those are the 2 things that change with scales

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#8
Major Diatonic Scale Formula: wwhwwwh
Minor Diatonic Scale Formula: whwwhww

A diatonic scale is a scale that contains 7 notes.

For example, in the Key of C major to figure out the diatonic major scale you would use the formula wwhwwwh to find the notes. Now if you understand key signatures you would already know that the C major scale has no sharps and flats, so those are the notes you play on the fretboard. Heres how you find them.

c - c# - d - d# - e - f - f# - g - g# - a - a# - b - c

so there you have the notes underlined. In major, the I, IV, and V are perfect, whole the ii, iii, and vi are minor, the vii is diminished.

To answer one of your questions, if someone said in the key of c major that the 5th is a half step up, you would take the 5th degree, which is a g, and play it as a g#.

A minor pentatonic mode is just a simpler version of a diatonic mode. IT only has 5 notes instead of the 7 notes found in the diatonic. You can find these scales on any website through google.

A chromatic scale is the scale with every note possible. The c chromatic scale written out would look like -- c c# d d# e f f# g g# a a# b c

Note that b and e do not have sharps.

A mode is just another decree of the major scale.

Ionian (Major Scale) - wwhwwwh - 1st degree
Dorian (minor tendency) - whwwwhw - 2nd degree
Phrygian (minor tendency) - hwwwhww - 3rd degree
Lydian (major tendency) - wwwhwwh - 4th degree
Mixolydian (major tendency) -wwhwwhw - 5th degree
Aeolian (Natural Minor) - whwwhww - 6th degree
Locrian (diminished) hwwhwww - 7th degree

I'm probably skipping over a lot but I've been wanting to write that out for a while. Hopefully that answers some questions.
Follow me on instagram @createdaily
#9
All I will say is, "Music theory will let you unlock the musical shelfs of your mind, knowing how to play a minor, then transends into a major, chromatic shuffles, "good" and "bad" intervals, everything in music theory can ONLY ADVANCE you in your playing."
#10
Quote by mercedesisbenz
Major Diatonic Scale Formula: wwhwwwh
Minor Diatonic Scale Formula: whwwhww

A diatonic scale is a scale that contains 7 notes.

For example, in the Key of C major to figure out the diatonic major scale you would use the formula wwhwwwh to find the notes. Now if you understand key signatures you would already know that the C major scale has no sharps and flats, so those are the notes you play on the fretboard. Heres how you find them.

c - c# - d - d# - e - f - f# - g - g# - a - a# - b - c

so there you have the notes underlined. In major, the I, IV, and V are perfect, whole the ii, iii, and vi are minor, the vii is diminished.

To answer one of your questions, if someone said in the key of c major that the 5th is a half step up, you would take the 5th degree, which is a g, and play it as a g#.

A minor pentatonic mode is just a simpler version of a diatonic mode. IT only has 5 notes instead of the 7 notes found in the diatonic. You can find these scales on any website through google.

A chromatic scale is the scale with every note possible. The c chromatic scale written out would look like -- c c# d d# e f f# g g# a a# b c

Note that b and e do not have sharps.

A mode is just another decree of the major scale.

Ionian (Major Scale) - wwhwwwh - 1st degree
Dorian (minor tendency) - whwwwhw - 2nd degree
Phrygian (minor tendency) - hwwwhww - 3rd degree
Lydian (major tendency) - wwwhwwh - 4th degree
Mixolydian (major tendency) -wwhwwhw - 5th degree
Aeolian (Natural Minor) - whwwhww - 6th degree
Locrian (diminished) hwwhwww - 7th degree

I'm probably skipping over a lot but I've been wanting to write that out for a while. Hopefully that answers some questions.


Ok so the pattern of a diatonic scale I ii iii IV V vi vii. If I were to play the ii mode of the key of C it would be a D minor scale, but if I were to play the V mode of the key of C it would be a G major scale?
Is that pattern used only in diatonic or in all scales itself?
Do you mean that modes are only used in major scales?

When you say degree do you mean the "number" of the note in the scale?
I'll keep it in the key of C:
1st Degree=C
2nd Degree=D
3rd Degree=E
4th Degree=F
5th Degree=G
6th Degree=A
7th Degree=B
and then the key starts over
Correct?

What do you mean the "7th is diminished"? I've heard people say that the 7th note in the scale usually doesnt fit right when played in a song so they normally flat it/drop one half step down.

In following the minor formula would the C minor scale be:
C, D, D#, F, G, G#, A#
correct?
Last edited by Crazy Horse at Feb 17, 2008,