#1
I've been playing guitar for a little under a year. It's time that I learn how to sight read without the GP/PTab crutches. Can anyone give me some helpful links? I'm not a rookie to music; I played brass instruments through high school. I'm looking for some practice resources in going directly from the bar-line to the fretboard. BTW, I get that 5th fret on the E string is an A, etc.

Any helpful links? Yes, I tried the search bar.
RIP Terry Kath (1978)
#2
just work on it, no overnight miracle to be able to sight read
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#3
The truth is that unless you're playing classical or jazz, you probably don't need to be able to sight read to play guitar. Most music written for guitars is in tablature. Being able to sight read is a great skill for a musician, but if you're just playing rock/blues/whatever, don't expect to use it that much.
#4
Let's just say that I want to learn anyways. At the very least, it would make writing a little less slow and awkward.
RIP Terry Kath (1978)
#5
Everybody that's posted is correct. You probably don't need it, but it is a useful skill. Guitar's actually kind of hard to sightread for since you have to figure out where on the neck to start and move to... so it takes time. Just practice reading sheet music and learn the whole fretboard, there's no quick solution and anybody who says otherwise is probably lying. Learning all your intervals, how they're placed on the fretboard and being able to quickly recognize them on paper is good too.
#6
And I'm asking where I can find some good sheet music to practice with. While it might seem like a good idea to just turn off the tabs in GP, the bends aren't shown and it is too tempting to double check myself.
RIP Terry Kath (1978)
#7
try some classical stuff. take some piano music and try and play it on guitar. for songs specifically for guitar... i'll get back to you on that, but i think there's a link in the acoustic and classical section in one of the stickies for various sheet music sites.
#9
i'm surprised that you played brass in high school and they never taught you how to sightread

if you wanna get better at sightreading just start reading A LOT of music, in a couple of years you might be decent
#10
Quote by Breakfast_Rock
I've been playing guitar for a little under a year. It's time that I learn how to sight read without the GP/PTab crutches. Can anyone give me some helpful links? I'm not a rookie to music; I played brass instruments through high school. I'm looking for some practice resources in going directly from the bar-line to the fretboard. BTW, I get that 5th fret on the E string is an A, etc.

Any helpful links? Yes, I tried the search bar.


some good books to practice sightreading from (which are books that I use) are:
-A Modern Method For Guitar-William Leavitt-Berklee Press
-Melodic Rhythms For Guitar-William Leavitt-Berklee Press
-Mel Bay's Modern Guitar Method-Mel Bay-Mel Bay Publications, Inc.

To get good at sightreading, you need to practice it daily for a bare minimum of one hour at the very least.

Also, NEVER USE TABS UNLESS YOU ABSOLUTELEY HAVE TO!! you should chose to transcribe songs by ear than to use tabs.
Gear:
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Last edited by fas11030 at Feb 18, 2008,
#11
-A Modern Method For Guitar-William Leavitt-Berklee Press


I recommend volumes 2 and 3 a lot more then 1. Either way I'd also throw in a recommendation of a Fake Book.

To get good at sightreading, you need to practice it daily for a bare minimum of one hour at the very least.


But don't play a song more then three times in a week, and never back to back. Otherwise you start to memorize it. Another reason a Fake Book is better then something like Modern Methods because it gives you more material.
#12
Quote by capiCrimm
I recommend volumes 2 and 3 a lot more then 1. Either way I'd also throw in a recommendation of a Fake Book.


But don't play a song more then three times in a week, and never back to back. Otherwise you start to memorize it. Another reason a Fake Book is better then something like Modern Methods because it gives you more material.


Volume 1 is a very good book to practice from. Also, you should practice a piece everyday, not three times a week. also, If you want to learn jazz standards, then use a fakebook, but Modern Methods is designed to teach you to read music. It is one of the best books you could use to learn how to read music. you can supplement that with lead sheets, but modern methods should be the main book you study from.
Gear:
-Brownsville BMAG3 (acoustic)
-Fender 70s Reissue 60th anniversary Stratocaster
-Line 6 Flextone III
-Crate RFX30 RetroFex
-Line 6 Tone Port UX1
-Roland Digital Piano HP-4500
-(other stuff)
#13
Also, you should practice a piece everyday, not three times a week. also


Sorry I wasn't clear, I meant the *same* piece three times a week. Of course, try and sightread as many songs as you can stand in a week. Or in other words. Page 64 of Modern Method Vol. 1, Title: Reading Studies :p

"DO NOT PRACTICE these two pages. . .just READ them, but not more than twice
thru-during any single practice session. . . Do not play them on two consecutive
days. . . Do not go back over any particular section because of a wrong note . . .
DO KEEP AN EVEN TEMPO and play the proper time values ... By obeying
these rules the "Reading Studies" will never be memorized ... A little later on
it is recommended that you use this procedure with a variety of material as this
is the only way for a guitarist to achieve and maintain any proficiency in reading.
(Even when working steady we are not reading every day - so "scare yourself in
the privacy of your practice sessions" . . . ."


Volume 1 is a very good book to practice from.


but it's written with open scale positions in mind. Not bad, but personally that was annoying for me and I had wished I had started with Vol. 2. So IMHO, if you know scales(as most people here do) there is no reason to not just go to Vol. 2. If your interested in just playing some of the practices(and it does have some good ones) grab the pdf off of a google search. It's a good book but I think 2 and 3 are much more useful.
#14
Quote by chrisp_5
i'm surprised that you played brass in high school and they never taught you how to sightread

if you wanna get better at sightreading just start reading A LOT of music, in a couple of years you might be decent


I should have been more specific. I can sight read, just not with guitar.

Quote by Nightfyre
try some classical stuff. take some piano music and try and play it on guitar. for songs specifically for guitar... i'll get back to you on that, but i think there's a link in the acoustic and classical section in one of the stickies for various sheet music sites.


Aha! I found the link. You, my friend, pointed me in the right direction. What I needed was a large volume of material to practice on, and you delivered. For anyone else in my situation, here's the link that I took to using:

http://www.creativeguitar.org/
RIP Terry Kath (1978)
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