#1
Okay so I have the primitive knowledge that a cadence is the definition of the name and voicing of a change between two intervals and used as say, punctuation for the ending of a phrase but after that i'm lost
It's something i'd deffinately like to learn and use in application of music but i'm very limited on the naming and practical use of it; so I've come here to see if anyone has any links or resources they can offer up from past experience or something to help me on my way, or just offer some words of advice about them

Last edited by philipisabeast at Feb 18, 2008,
#2
Google, where all your questions are answered. Just type in lesson on cadences or even look to see if UG has a lesson on 'em
#3
perfect = V - I
plagal = IV - I
deceptive = V - vi

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
www.musictheory.net has a great lesson on cadences.
My name is Andy
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
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#5
Quote by axemanchris
perfect = V - I
plagal = IV - I
deceptive = V - vi

CT


Perfect requires that both chords be voiced in the root position, and that the root of the I chord be higher than the V chord.

This website explains them in detail.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
Perfect requires that both chords be voiced in the root position, and that the root of the I chord be higher than the V chord.

This website explains them in detail.


Really? The Royal Conservatory of Music begs to differ. In a perfect cadence, the chords must share one common note, the inversion doesn't matter.
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#7
Quote by Muphin
Really? The Royal Conservatory of Music begs to differ. In a perfect cadence, the chords must share one common note, the inversion doesn't matter.


Are you thinking of perfect or authentic cadence? An authentic cadence can be in whatever inversion or position you choose, but it's my impression that perfect cadence requires that both chords be in root position, and the I higher than the V.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
Are you thinking of perfect or authentic cadence? An authentic cadence can be in whatever inversion or position you choose, but it's my impression that perfect cadence requires that both chords be in root position, and the I higher than the V.


They still call it perfect.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#9
Quote by Muphin
They still call it perfect.


I've been searching around, and every source I've looked at, including the textbooks from my school's music department, maintain that a V-I progression is an authentic cadence, and that perfect cadence applies specifically to an authentic cadence in which both chords are in the root position, and the I is higher than the V.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
i mix up perfect and authentic sometimes, wiki always helps me-
Authentic (or closed, or standard) cadence: V to I. The phrase perfect cadence is sometimes used as a synonym for authentic cadence, but can also have a more precise meaning depending on the chord voicing:
Perfect authentic cadence (PAC): The chords are in root position; that is, the roots of both chords are in the bass, and the root of the final chord is in the highest voice. A PAC is a progression from V to I in major keys, and V to i in minor keys. This is generally the strongest type of cadence.
Imperfect authentic cadence (IAC), best divided into 3 separate categories:
1. Root position IAC: similar to a PAC, but the highest voice is not the tonic ("do" or the root of the tonic chord).
2. Inverted IAC: similar to a PAC, but one or both chords must be inverted.
3. Leading tone IAC: the V chord is replaced with the viio chord (but the cadence still ends on I).


so it appears Archeo is correct. the forementioned cadence would be imperfect authentic
Last edited by branny1982 at Feb 18, 2008,
#11
Quote by branny1982
i mix up perfect and authentic sometimes, wiki always helps me-
Authentic (or closed, or standard) cadence: V to I. The phrase perfect cadence is sometimes used as a synonym for authentic cadence, but can also have a more precise meaning depending on the chord voicing:
Perfect authentic cadence (PAC): The chords are in root position; that is, the roots of both chords are in the bass, and the root of the final chord is in the highest voice. A PAC is a progression from V to I in major keys, and V to i in minor keys. This is generally the strongest type of cadence.
Imperfect authentic cadence (IAC), best divided into 3 separate categories:
1. Root position IAC: similar to a PAC, but the highest voice is not the tonic ("do" or the root of the tonic chord).
2. Inverted IAC: similar to a PAC, but one or both chords must be inverted.
3. Leading tone IAC: the V chord is replaced with the viio chord (but the cadence still ends on I).


so it appears Archeo is correct. the forementioned cadence would be imperfect authentic

You got to it before me. =\

Also, a deceptive cadence doesn't have to be V - vi all the time. It's V to whatever you want, it's just commonly followed by a vi chord. Another cadence some people tend to forget is the half cadence, which is any chord to the V.
#12
Half is also known as imperfect, just to add on.

The Plagal cadence is IV - I, and if I'm not mistake, there are no subdivisions on that concerning the inversions of the chords.
#13
So could someone explain the Phrygian Half Cadence? I can't find my old notes, but isn't it something like vi to ii?
#14
Wiki says:
Quote by Wiki
Phrygian half cadence: a half cadence from iv⁶ to V in minor, so named because the motion in the outer voices resembles the structure of the Phrygian mode.


I zoomed in as it was unclear, and that blob is a superscript 6, which means that the chord is in it's first inversion. Using C major as an example: C E G --> E G C (first inversion). E to G is a third (understood, so it isn't noted), and E to C is a sixth.

EDIT: I have a question. Could someone please explain how it resembles the structure of the Phryigian mode?
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Feb 18, 2008,
#15
Kirb, In C minor it is Ab C F -> G B D, Im guessing it's because of the half step movement from Ab to G. This might explain it better http://www.smu.edu/totw/cadences.htm
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#16
Quote by Muphin
Really? The Royal Conservatory of Music begs to differ. In a perfect cadence, the chords must share one common note, the inversion doesn't matter.


Take RCM Grade two theory, and you only learn perfect, plagal, and imperfect cadences. Grade 3 Harmony, will teach you that perfect cadences are actually Perfect authentic Cadences, and follow the rules stated by archeo. They also have different names for the plagal and deceptive cadences, and teach you several others not covered in Grade 2.