#1
I was wondering where i can get some solid technical and general information about pre amps and EQs. I'm not exactly sure what these do to your tone. I know an EQ fine tunes your tone and basicly filters out or in what frequency ranges you want. I'm just curious how much they help your sound.

What i'm really concerned with is what the benefit of the pre amp is?

Sorry for the nub question, but we all have to be dumb at one point right?
Peavey VK112
Fish&Chips EQ
Ibanez TS9DX
Jackson Warrior JS30 upgraded EMG 81/85
Epiphone Silverburst 1966 Reissue G-400
Washburn D12N

Playing since 03-11-07
........Uber Noob Skillz
#2
Preamp boost your guitar's signal for the poweramp. It shapes the over sound of the amp (though the poweramp contributes). You've accurately described what an eq does. The benefit of a separate eq from you amp is two fold.

1. Power of control. It has more bands for cutting/boosting and can cut/boost them further than your amps tone stack

2. You can set you eq up for a dramatically different sound. Example: Set the amps eq up for your cleans and the eq for dist. When you go to your gain channel click on the eq for a dramatically different sound.

Eqs are very powerful tools and well worth the expense. I suggest the MXR 10 band eq.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#3
Excellent questions, friend.

Preamps boost your signal, making your tone more robust - which means it is resistant to degradation by going through effects loops and so on.

They can also be a point of distortion if you want that. Tube pres can give you harmonic distortion that "fatten" up your tone.

EQ is just as you said, a filter.

I suggest (in general with a nonspecific audio system) starting with a known source, like a CD you know inside and out, have heard a billion times, and turning every EQ fader or knob to zero.

Crank the amp. Not all the way, but fairly juicy.

Now starting with bass, get the level of each frequency you want. How much thump will you need?

If you still don't have enough, turn your amp up. This is the most taxing of the frequencies so you will determine your volume by the loudness of the bass, ultimately.

Next you can either move to the top or just go in order from low to high. Depends on taste and experience and the given situation. I generally move from left to right or high to low.

So take your next knob or fader and move it so that it is audible, but balanced against your now plenty loud and juicy bass sound.

Same thing with each one. Never make any one frequency louder than the bass except for the 2.5kHz range and sometimes the highest frequencies if you're going deaf like most of us.

2.5 k is "what you hear," that's the "information" frequency, the one we are most sensitive to. This, combined with bass, is largely what determines "how loud" the music is. Thus be judicious with this knob/fader (high mid on a 4-knob system.)

Is it overpowering your bass? Bring it back. Now it becomes an art. Do you want the music bassy or more balanced? For dance music you probably want a lot of bass. Funk, hip-hop, mix the EQ bassy generally speaking.

For classical music, make the 2.5 k and the bass as even as possible. You're going for accurate reproduction of the live performance.

Keep style in mind.

Above 2.5 kHz it's very subjective and highly dependent on your room, the program material and your own personal taste. Too much high will make it sound tinny, but you'll get more stereo "space" and you'll pick out individual instruments more. Voices may become nasally and you'll start to hear more and more noise, which you can never get rid of.

The high end is where the music breathes and lives. I suggest making it pretty much even with the bass until you're more comfortable with it.

At times you'll make a sharp cut to kill feedback and so on. That's more advanced stuff.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#4
Wow! Both of you thanks for the amazing responses. That really does help on explaining both. I'm an electronic engineer and know a little bit about filters and wasn't sure exactly how an EQ worked on the sound ranges, but now i am getting a clearer image.

I am trying to play metal and would love to fatten my bottom up for more punch and get a scooped sound too. I like crunchy, trebly, scooped distortion and i like a fatter rhythm distortion too. I'm guessing an EQ, tuned correctly, could define my tone in the way that i want it better than the 3 eq on my amp?

One last thing about the signal booster. So this is basicly if I was say Steve Vai, who uses a pedal board run by NASA, and had so many pedals and effects that the signal needed to "physically" boost the signal to get to the amp?

Would a signal booster benefit a person who wanted tube saturation at low volumes to get a better tube tone without the volume, or would a good attenuator do that?
Peavey VK112
Fish&Chips EQ
Ibanez TS9DX
Jackson Warrior JS30 upgraded EMG 81/85
Epiphone Silverburst 1966 Reissue G-400
Washburn D12N

Playing since 03-11-07
........Uber Noob Skillz
#5
Sorry to bump, but was just wondering if any other VK112 users have had success in dialing in their tone with a good EQ pedal.
Peavey VK112
Fish&Chips EQ
Ibanez TS9DX
Jackson Warrior JS30 upgraded EMG 81/85
Epiphone Silverburst 1966 Reissue G-400
Washburn D12N

Playing since 03-11-07
........Uber Noob Skillz