#1
What do you think about them? Also, what do you think about witchcraft as a whole?

This is a essay that I recently wrote on the matter.


From June through September of 1692, nineteen men and women, all having been convicted of witchcraft, were hanged. Another man of over eighty years of age was pressed to death under heavy stones for refusing to submit to a trial on witchcraft charges. Hundreds of others faced accusations of witchcraft. Dozens languished in jail for months without trials. Then, almost as soon as it had begun, the hysteria that swept through Puritan Massachusetts ended.
Why did this travesty of justice occur? Nothing about this tragedy was inevitable. Only an unfortunate combination of an ongoing frontier war, economic conditions, teenage boredom, and personal jealousies can account for the spiraling accusations, trials, and executions that occurred in the spring and summer of 1692.
Many, if not all of the cases, could have been explained medically. For example, the case of Betty Paris.

Sometime during February of the winter of 1692, young Betty Parris became strangely ill. She dashed about, dove under furniture, contorted in pain, and complained of fever. The cause of her symptoms may have been some combination of stress, asthma, guilt, boredom, child abuse, epilepsy, and delusional psychosis.

At the time, however, there was another theory to explain the girls' symptoms. Cotton Mather published a book describing the suspected witchcraft of an Irish washerwoman in Boston. Betty's behavior in some ways mirrored that of the afflicted person described in Mather's book. It was easy to believe in 1692 in Salem, that the devil was close at hand. Sudden and violent death occupied minds.
Talk of witchcraft increased when other playmates of Betty, including eleven-year-old Ann Putnam and seventeen-year-old Mercy Lewis, began to exhibit similar unusual behavior.
When his own treatments failed to effect a cure, William Griggs, a doctor called to examine the girls, suggested that the girls' problems might have of supernatural origin. The widespread belief that witches targeted children made the doctor's diagnosis seem increasing likely.
So, given these circumstances, it is easy to see why the people of Salem thought this. Even if the people that they hanged and prosecuted were witches, they still shouldn’t have been killed. The Bible says that God loves the sinner, yet that He hates the sin. “How can you say to your brother, `Let me take the speck out of your eye,' and behold, the log is in your own eye?” Matthew 7:3 ."He who is without sin among you, let him be the first to throw a stone at her." John 8:7.

So, as Christians, we should not kill another person when we suspect that they have sinned against God. The Bible shows us that if we suspect sin in another, that we should show the truth in love, and always point them back to the cross.

Let us remember that we have all sinned, and fallen short of the glory
Last edited by rockownsyou at Feb 18, 2008,
#2
All I have to say is, "More weight."
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#3
Quote by Beware!Criminal
All I have to say is, "More weight."

That line saved the entire book for me.
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#4
I see how this is going to end. There's going to be a big fight over religion and it's just going to get spammed up.
Oh well, it happens I suppose.
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#5
"Witchcraft" was used by the people of that time to explain what was happening around them before science and reason were used.
#6
Quote by Chobes
"Witchcraft" was used by the people of that time to explain what was happening around them before science and reason were used.



No, that's not the biggest part of it.
#8
Quote by Archaon


No, that's not the biggest part of it.


It went from blaming witches for death to finding the actual causes like disease.

Oh well, I don't know much on the subject anyway.
#9
Quote by Beware!Criminal
All I have to say is, "More weight."



That was possibly the most bad ass line in literature.
#10
Quote by Chobes
It went from blaming witches for death to finding the actual causes like disease.

No, I mean it was a political and religious tool to exterminate those that spoke out against those in power.
#12
Quote by Archaon
No, I mean it was a political and religious tool to exterminate those that spoke out against those in power.


Oh, that part of witchcraft, never mind about what I said earlier.
#13
well there are a few things that contributed to the witch hunts of the 1500s and 1600s...the most important being puritanical christian ass holes persecuting people who practiced traditional pre christian rituals or religions...however i know a good deal of people haullucinated due to eregot poisoning (which is caused by contaminated rye in bread)....these people were killed as witches, due to the strange behavior they exhibited while the haullucinations occured.
#14
GILES COREY FTW

I thought it was stupid

like you
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#15
Crucible was mad, 20 million times better than any other high school book. Plus you didn't have to search heaps to find stuff to use in essays, unlike other crap where you're flicking through 20 pages like a dumbass trying to find a quote
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#16
Quote by Matty_V
Crucible was mad, 20 million times better than any other high school book. Plus you didn't have to search heaps to find stuff to use in essays, unlike other crap where you're flicking through 20 pages like a dumbass trying to find a quote



+100000 That's the one book I enjoyed in High School. I enjoyed Tkamb, but only the first out of 7 times I had to read it.
#17
I read the Crucible, saw the film. It was crazy, especially at the "Cry Out" scene where the girls are mimicking Mary Warren.

And yes, Abigail was a bitch, I feel sorry for Mary Warren, and of course the Proctor family.

Giles was a cool guy, and Parris is just a ****.
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