#1
what CJ rocker said in my other thread "is jackson gutiars dying??" incited my interest. I Looked online but i could only find the wikipedia articel which had like 2 paragraphs. Where can i find a detailed history of it??
The Mitch Clem formula
1)make jokes about rancid and NOFX (as if they dont already make fun of themselves)
2)make obvious punk puns, possibly related to food
3)make fun of Rancid and NOFX again
4)??????
5)PROFIT (and an army of internet fanboys)
#4
their site?

google
Acoustic Percussion Guitar Player
Quote by InvaderTSN
I can only poop during full moons.
#7
tried all of em, nothing but like 2 paragraphs.
The Mitch Clem formula
1)make jokes about rancid and NOFX (as if they dont already make fun of themselves)
2)make obvious punk puns, possibly related to food
3)make fun of Rancid and NOFX again
4)??????
5)PROFIT (and an army of internet fanboys)
#9
cjrocker didnt read one book and know what he knows....he has amounted knowledge that takes years upon years to obtain.
Jackson KV2 USA Snow White/Black Bevels
#11
Heh, thanks guys. I've been heavily into them for about a year and a half now... I did a detailed history of Charvel as a report last year, but I'll need to get it off my other PC. I'll post it tomorrow and a companion one for Jackson.
#12
Abridged history as I can't find the report atm:

Charvel guitars started around '74 when Wayne Charvel became well known for his expert guitar repairs and mods. Here he began doing guitar repairs and soon moved to San Dimas, where he also started making bodies, necks, hardware, and complete kits. In 1977 however, the company was barely staying afloat financially. Grover Jackson, an employee of Wayne bought the company and shop the same year. Around this time, they began selling their parts under various names: boogie Bodies, and they supplied bodie's, necks, and hardware (but NOT pickups) OEM to DiMarzio. Come 1979, the first fully assembled Charvels rolled off the line, but were quickly halted when EVH threatened to sue the company due to their likeness to his VHII guitar (indeed, supporting gold vintage tremolos and single humbuckers on a distinctive black and yellow striped scheme, its easy to see why EVH was not happy)

In 1980, Grover soon launched a sub brand, Jackson. This was reserved for neck-thru guitars, often with 24 frets and radical body shapes (will be covered in a seperate write up). Charvel mainly built bolt on 22 fret guitars with Fender Headstocks and body shapes, save for their unusual Star shape, which would become the favored guitar of hair metal rocker Chris Holmes of WASP.

The company continued on like this until 1986. There, the company entered a long running deal with the company IMC of Fort Worth Texas. It was at this time Charvel production moved entirely overseas to Japan. These guitars (the Model series) quickly became known for being extremely high quality and excellent playing guitars. In 1989 to 1990, The line was expanded with the 275, 375, 475, 650XL, 750XL, Avenger (very much a Charvel Rhoads), CX series, ATX series, and several more. During this time the Model series was phased out of production. The Charvette line of budget minded Korean guitars was also introduced, but would only last a couple years.

Like many companies of the time, Charvel enjoyed high sales and and a reputation for excellent guitars. However, around 1994 the company began to collapse. The market for Super Strats was imploding, and Charvel reduced its line down to just a couple models in an effort to try and stay afloat. Despite efforts to kick start the company by introducing a short lived run of USA San Dimas models, things did not improve. However, come 1996, Akai bought the struggling company. Akai had to make a tough decision; keep Charvel going and hope the brand can survive, or cut the brand and to insure the survival of slightly better fairing Jackson. They choose the second option.

Fast forward to 2004. FMIC puts the plans in motion to buy the Jackson/Charvel brand name, and soon does. FMIC deciedes to revive the company under the slogan of "The Original Hot Rod Guitar", and its flagship model is the Charvel EVH. Likewise, the brand name is also applied to a number of Japan-only guitars that were never made available to USA consumers.

Today, the company has been taken back to its roots; a high end maker of one-of-a-kind super strats, much like how they were back in the early 80's. Excluding limited runs and Japan-only models, the company now deals only in Custom orders. However, rumors are around that a MIJ Charvel may soon see the light of day in the USA Market based of evidence from Summer NAMM 2007, though the lack of any news ta winter NAMM this year has deadened those hopes now to some degree.

So there you have it I'll write up a Jackson one a little later.