#1
My friend had his guitar packed in a van with some other stuff in it. My other friend was trying to be funny and dove in searching for his bag and screaming. The result? This:



http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t193/CM_X5/Broken%20Guitar/DSC08297.jpg
http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t193/CM_X5/Broken%20Guitar/DSC08300.jpg


So I offered to help him out. I have wood glue and common sense but that's about it. Will that be enough to fix it or should this type of thing not be attempted by a beginner? I'm also mainly taking the opportunity to learn how to fix this should it ever happen to me and just for learning experience. He doesn't care if it looks bad or anything all he wants is to be able to play it again.
Quote by Jearl

...dont play Fender just because its Fender.

Gear:
Ibanez SZ520QM
Peavey Rotor EXP
Squier Bullet (heavily modified)
Mesa Roadster Head & 2x12 cab
Last edited by CM_X5 at Feb 19, 2008,
#2
take it to a repair shop
theyll fix it
dont try and do it yourself
Vikings? What Vikings? We are but poor, simple farmers. The village was burning when we got here, and the people must have slain themselves.
#3
you shouldn't try this without at least one or two nice clamps, id say glue it, clamp it, and let it sit for a good long while before touching it. as long is it is a clean break it should be playable again.
#4
Use a lot of wood glue, clamp it up with some blocks or cork to protect the neck, get a wet rag to wipe up all the glue that comes out better to have a bunch come out then not have enough there. Then leave it sit for 24 hours. It happened to my sg it plays just like new but it is still noticeable,\.
#5
Quote by COBHC6
take it to a repair shop
theyll fix it
dont try and do it yourself


No repair shops
No money

Plus I want to learn how, seems like a very useful thing to know for the just in case.
Quote by Jearl

...dont play Fender just because its Fender.

Gear:
Ibanez SZ520QM
Peavey Rotor EXP
Squier Bullet (heavily modified)
Mesa Roadster Head & 2x12 cab
#6
Dude, I just fixed almost an identical repair on a Epiphone Les Paul.



All you need is some Titebond II wood glue and a clamp. The glue cost $2.55 at my local hardware store, and a big spring loaded clamp can be purchased from the same place for under $10.

Just unscrew the screws holding that truss rod cover on.. i can see the one screw running thru the break there.. next apply a generous amount of glue to both the headstock and the neck, then put 'em together and clamp 'em. Have a clean damp rag handy to wipe up the glue that squirts out the crack.

Leave it clamped overnight, and make sure the guitar stays at a reasonable 60 to 80 degrees.. don't leave it in an unheated garage overnight, for example.

After 24 hours, take off the clamp, put the truss rod cover back on, and string it up.

You'll probably find that the crack will be real obvious both on the front and back.. not much you can do about that, short of buying some wood putty and filling in the cracks and sanding smooth, then re-finishing the headstock.
#7
^ Wow that's practically the same break, is this a common thing for these type of guitars or something?

Thanks for the detailed run-through, I'll probably get started tomorrow morning and wait until after work and see how far along it went. Maybe just wait until the next day to re-string it.
Quote by Jearl

...dont play Fender just because its Fender.

Gear:
Ibanez SZ520QM
Peavey Rotor EXP
Squier Bullet (heavily modified)
Mesa Roadster Head & 2x12 cab
Last edited by CM_X5 at Feb 19, 2008,
#8
Yea.. it's a common break not just on the Epiphones, but on the 'real' Gibson Les Pauls as well.

The problem is the neck is more or less one piece of wood.. and wood tends to grow straight.

The headstock on LP guitars tilts back.. so a real weak point is at that "bend" along the grain of the wood.

The good news is that glues like Titebond II when properly used, create a bond far stronger than the original wood. The guitar may break again someday, but it won't be in the same spot!

I've heard it said many times over the years by Gibson junkies.. "A Les Paul ain't a Les Paul unless it's had it's headstock glued back on at least once!"
#9
Quote by FiddleMoor

I've heard it said many times over the years by Gibson junkies.. "A Les Paul ain't a Les Paul unless it's had it's headstock glued back on at least once!"

Quite an interesting quote.

One last question though, does it really need to be Titebond II? I have a bottle of carpenters Wood Glue that I've used for smaller scale guitar-related things. It looks something like this: http://images.orgill.com/200x200/6847321.jpg but a different picture on the front.
Quote by Jearl

...dont play Fender just because its Fender.

Gear:
Ibanez SZ520QM
Peavey Rotor EXP
Squier Bullet (heavily modified)
Mesa Roadster Head & 2x12 cab
#10
It would probably work.

When you're clamping it, it wouldn't hurt to use as many clamps as you can. Otherwise you could end up with a crappy glue joint and have the neck break in the same place.

Epiphone and Gibson necks tend to break like that because they are two peices of wood. Sometimes glue joints can fail.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#11
good break, thankfully its past the nut


DO NOT TRY TO DO IT YOURSELF!

that said, bring it to a good luthier, expect to pay $250
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#12
p.s. to make the repair even better beat the piss out of the kid that broke it, it will make everyone feel better
Quote by ILuvPillows?
Masturbate it off.
#13
Quote by the mailman
good break, thankfully its past the nut


DO NOT TRY TO DO IT YOURSELF!

that said, bring it to a good luthier, expect to pay $250

A few posts ahead I mentioned there are no shops near here and the nearest would charge more than that IF they even did it themselves. Some repairs they just send out to some other shop. Plus this guy would have thrown it out anyways it's a last ditch effort to have it play-able and I want to learn this myself. Even if I mess up it's only an Epi Les Paul 100.
Quote by hoondog
p.s. to make the repair even better beat the piss out of the kid that broke it, it will make everyone feel better

Haha we'll see what happens, the guy is out of town right now so I think he's gonna get **** when he gets back. Thing is we don't know 100% it was him but probably 98% sure.
Quote by Jearl

...dont play Fender just because its Fender.

Gear:
Ibanez SZ520QM
Peavey Rotor EXP
Squier Bullet (heavily modified)
Mesa Roadster Head & 2x12 cab
#14
well ive never done this before but just using some common sense be careful. If the glue doesnt hold, with all that tension from the strings, you better look out.

Just imagine a projectile the size of... well a hard wooden headstock, being hurled at you. If the glue doesnt hold I can see someone posibbly getting hurt. Ive seen some nasty cuts from strings breaking and slashing a finger or something, imagine the force with 6 strings attached to a headstock.

personally if I were you I would go for the stronger glue mentioned above.
my two cents
-------------------------------
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B-52 AT 112
Ted Weber Mass100 attenuator
EHX Small Clone
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Dunlop 535Q Wah
Wax Potting tutorial
#15
I've used Elmers Carpenters Wood Glue for things like re-attaching fingerboards to necks, or in general carpentry.. but I don't have any direct experience with that particular glue in high tension applications, like you'd have when re-attaching a guitar headstock.

Like I said.. the local Ace hardware and Tru-Value stores sell a decent size bottle of Titebond II.. enough glue to do up a hundred such projects for $2.55

Yes, I understand you're trying to do this on the cheap.. and the Elmers might do the trick, but i'd play it safe and spend the $3 on the top notch glue.