#1
Can someone tell me the fingering positions for C#m and F# and what strings to strum because I have not a clue how to and I searched the web and could not find anything? Thanks.
#2
f# is just the normal F barre chord moved up a fret and c#m is a bm shape on the 4th fret.

so

133211 is f sharp

446654 is c sharp minor

i think, been a while since i used open chords
Acoustic Percussion Guitar Player
Quote by InvaderTSN
I can only poop during full moons.
#3
Quote by robertreilly666
f# is just the normal F barre chord moved up a fret and c#m is a bm shape on the 4th fret.

so

133211 is f sharp

446654 is c sharp minor

i think, been a while since i used open chords


Yeah, those are both right.
It may take you some practice though to play those, those are both barre chords (well, duh...) and if you just started strumming chords, these may be hard for you
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#5
Quote by robertreilly666
f# is just the normal F barre chord moved up a fret and c#m is a bm shape on the 4th fret.

so

133211 is f sharp

446654 is c sharp minor

i think, been a while since i used open chords


nope thats an f natural.

an f sharp is 244322
Paul Gilbert
Steve Vai
Joe Satriani
John Petrucci
#6
I still can't figure it out what strings to put my fingers on and what frets to use
#7
"Can someone tell me the fingering positions for C#m and F# and what strings to strum because I have not a clue how to and I searched the web and could not find anything? Thanks."


Hi. If you encounter this problem more often it might help to invest some effort into understanding chord construction.
For example, if you KNOW what notes make up a C#m -Chord, and KNOW where they lie on the guitar fretboard, you can construct this chord (and any other) on your own.
Learning resources are readily available if you know what keywords to enter into google.

As for specific chordforms of the C#m chord, the most common ones are:

x-4-6-6-5-4

and

9-11-11-9-9-9


In case you don't know what this means: The numbers represent the frets that ought to be held down by the fingers of the left hand in order to form this particular chord. The number sequence is arranged according to the guitar-strings: from left to right = from low (thick) E-string to high (thin) e-string

And the X in the first chord form means that this particular string (thick e-string) should not be played (and therefore also doesn't need to be fretted down).

A major obstacle, especially for beginning players, is that these chordforms utilize a fingering method called "barre". A barre is when one finger (in these cases usually the index finger) frets down across multiple strings. So, for example, in the second chordform (the one on the 9th fret), the index finger is laid down straight across the 9th fret of all strings, while the 11 on the A-string is held down with the middle finger, and the D-string 11th fret is held by the pinky.
This can be quite hard at first, it takes slow and concentrated practice to get that down. If you need more info or visual aid, try hitting up youtube.

you can sometimes make things easier if you don't finger the complete chordshape, but just a small subsection that's easier to manage, just three or two strings of the chord. This is not just laziness: Full Bar-Chords are mostly played in acoustic strumming styles, but when you play in a larger arrangement, it often helps the sound if you "thin out" some of your chord voicings.

I could show you some more of the chord voicings, but as the saying goes: Give a man a fish and he won't be hungry for a day. Teach him how to fish and he won't be hungry ever again.

Hit up on google, type in "online guitar chords" or "guitar chord generator" or "chord library" or any other variation on this theme you can think of. There are lots of good programs out there, both online and downloadable, that can give you all the chordforms, and some even tell you what finger to use on what fret/string, represented with numbers (1=index,2=middle,3=ring,4=pinky).

Also, if you have the program Guitar Pro, it has a mighty chord generator built in. You may want to download a demo of it, it's a highly enjoyable program.