#1
Hello!
I just started out with some music theory because I just don't really know theory.

So I was checking out the major scale and found out that there are several ways to play your major scale (I believe their are at least 5). I looked at the first position and saw that it should be played like this way

E|---------------------------2-3---|
B|-----------------------3-5-------|
G|-----------------2-4-5----------|
D|-----------2-4-5----------------|
A|-----2-3-5----------------------|
E|-3-5-----------------------------|

But then at some other site I saw it should be played like this way.

E|---------------------------2-3-5--|
B|-----------------------3-5---------|
G|-----------------2-4-5------------|
D|-----------2-4-5------------------|
A|-----2-3-5------------------------|
E|-2-3-5----------------------------|

(@ (http://www.justinguitar.com/html/chords_scales_html/Scale_Major.html )

So with an added F# on the low E string and on the high e string.

Can someone help me out?

Thanks!
#2
yes, you can tab out the notes of the major scale any way you wish!

Basically, the F# you have spotted is the 7th degree of the scale, before the root.

Try to learn the notes that scales are comprised of and then use your guitar (and a basic shape maybe) to see where the scales can go. they can go anywhere, if you stick to the correct notes
#3
Hello Branny1982!

Thank you for your reply!

But, the 7th degree of the scaleI really don't know what that is. Is that like an add? Just like you can do with chords like cadd9 ands stuff.
I'm really at the basics for scales .

But because you can play the scale anywhere, only with the correct notes, means I can play it on 1 string to? (That's not really interesting offcourse)

Thanks!
#4
yes, you can play a scale on one string, in fact that is probably a very good way of learning the intervals, because you can see them easier.

A major scale has 7 degrees, ie 1 degree for each note A B C D E F G.

you tabbed G major, so the degrees are-

1st G
2nd A
3rd B
4th C
5th D
6th E
7th F#
#5
Scales are collections of notes, not box shapes. All scales cover the entire fretboard.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Can someone help me out?

you should start to read traditional notation as well as tab , that will really help
#8
Quote by branny1982
all scales must also be learnt somehow.

there is no way your fingers can learn where the notes are without some sort of practice.... enter scale patterns


Your fingers don't need to learn the notes in that way though - if you know the notes on the fretboard and know the notes a scale contains then you can work out the patterns for yourself and you absorb the information better.

Scale patterns are better used as tools for helping you actually use the scale as opposed to learning it in the first place.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
I'm wary of relying on muscle memory in this particular context as it tends to just teach people to mindlessly run up and down scales...I think it's important not to lose sight of the true purpose of scales and that's as a musical tool for you to use and interpret, not reproduce "as is".
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#11
yes, but at some point or other, you want to be able to play up and down scale patterns accurately, so the patterns do help. they also help in training the ear for the scale sound.

they should not be relied upon as a learning source though, i think you need to learn the theory with them and understand their uses.
#12
I guess that's where we differ - I don't see any real benefit in being able to run straight up and down scales, I just think it sounds boring.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#13
Hello people!

Thank you for your comments on this one! I didn't realised that a scale is just a bunch of notes and that you can actually play it anywhere on the fretboard.

That's where improvising is taking over i guess? To know which group of notes are in a particular scale and play them all over your fretboard.

But I have just one question about them scales. Imagine if, by example I know the notes that are in a G major scale and I didn't know anything about patterns, how could I then hear what a good scale should sound like. Because you can pick all these notes around your fretboard but then it would sound like high notes and low notes all mixed up.
(Pardon for my english, i'm from the Netherlands)

Thanks to all!
#14
Quote by Thomaso
Hello!
I just started out with some music theory because I just don't really know theory.

So I was checking out the major scale and found out that there are several ways to play your major scale (I believe their are at least 5). I looked at the first position and saw that it should be played like this way

E|---------------------------2-3---|
B|-----------------------3-5-------|
G|-----------------2-4-5----------|
D|-----------2-4-5----------------|
A|-----2-3-5----------------------|
E|-3-5-----------------------------|

But then at some other site I saw it should be played like this way.

E|---------------------------2-3-5--|
B|-----------------------3-5---------|
G|-----------------2-4-5------------|
D|-----------2-4-5------------------|
A|-----2-3-5------------------------|
E|-2-3-5----------------------------|

(@ (http://www.justinguitar.com/html/chords_scales_html/Scale_Major.html )

So with an added F# on the low E string and on the high e string.

Can someone help me out?

Thanks!



Make sure that you realize it is just a formula... there are hundreds of ways to play the major scale on a guitar... 5 of which are very common...

You need to view it in terms of singular upward motion and not so much and across motion... Vertical is the way to view based on each and every key. This will make it much easier to visualize the positions stacked on top of one another.

There are three ways which I have seen it represented before:
1. positions stacked on top of one another
2. by string singularly moving upward and downward
3. diagonal shapes moving from say a first fret to a twelfth, which basically involves moving all the way from the low E to the highest e string, etc.

All of these however can be greatly simplified by being able to visualize what the pattens look like vertically on the entire fret board not just on a singular fret.


Your best bet is to get an interval map and mess around with that... and practice the sideways patterns... remember that the patterns are just ways of playing formulated from an interval map.

Peace,
Mike
#15
Quote by Thomaso
But I have just one question about them scales. Imagine if, by example I know the notes that are in a G major scale and I didn't know anything about patterns, how could I then hear what a good scale should sound like. Because you can pick all these notes around your fretboard but then it would sound like high notes and low notes all mixed up.
(Pardon for my english, i'm from the Netherlands)

Thanks to all!

Thats when phrasing comes in, and since you're a beginner try learning other players licks, incorporate them into your playing and then start making your own patterns/licks
#16
Quote by steven seagull
I guess that's where we differ - I don't see any real benefit in being able to run straight up and down scales, I just think it sounds boring.


+1. You can learn the shapes and patterns, there's nothing wrong with it, just learn WHY certain notes are part of specific scales and keys and you can create more interesting solos on the fly using your knowledge.
#17
Quote by silentdud


There are three ways which I have seen it represented before:
1. positions stacked on top of one another
2. by string singularly moving upward and downward
3. diagonal shapes moving from say a first fret to a twelfth, which basically involves moving all the way from the low E to the highest e string, etc.

All of these however can be greatly simplified by being able to visualize what the pattens look like vertically on the entire fret board not just on a singular fret.

Your best bet is to get an interval map and mess around with that... and practice the sideways patterns... remember that the patterns are just ways of playing formulated from an interval map.

Peace,
Mike


So you mean an interval map like WWHWWHWW ( W = Whole and H = Half)?

And I don't really get the position stacked on top of one another? You mean like just mix up the position to create new ones?

Thanks for the explanation! It really helped me out!