#1
Well i've gone halfway through theory class and our teacher plans to test us on almost everything at the end of the week....only problem is I don't know anything.

I tried listening in class but everything seemed to jump or skip and I got lost every now and then. The rest of the class consists of vocalists who have been sining since middle school or earlier and some orchestra musicians so me being a plain old guitarist who can only read elementary level music was at a severe disadvantage.


-Anyways we first went over rhythms and time signature which I know pretty well.

-Then key signatures where I got some what lost, I know how to tell what key a piece of music is in form looking at the signature and such but that's all I haven't memorized it.

-We also had to memorize the circle of fifths which I did for a short time but I never understood it's use or relation to anything else in theory and forgot it.

-Now we're at intervals, I can understand the idea of a M2, or it's inversion which is m7. However when she plays them I have no idea if it's a major or a minor????

If anyone could give some insight to any of these or link me to a proper sight it would help a lot. With such a varied class our teacher goes at the pace of the advance orchestral musicians and I end up missing out.
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#3
about intervals:

m2 - 1 half step
M2 - 2 half steps
m3 - 3 half steps
M3 - 4 half steps
P4 - 5 half steps
Tritone - 6 half steps
P5 - 7 half steps
m6 - 8 half steps
M6 - 9 half steps
m7 - 10 half steps
M7 - 11 half steps
Octave - 12 half Steps

M2 is the inversion of m7 because M2 is 2 half steps and m7 is 10 half steps - that equals 12 - an octave. let's say you start on C. 2 half steps up is D, and 10 half steps down is D (but an octave lower). Think of a chord and it's inversions - it can have different positions and notes an octave or two higher or lower, but it's the same notes. Interval inversions use the same logic - same notes, different places.
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#5
Alright thanks alot guy, been a great help.
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' " The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death"...'-p.269-Deathly Hallows
#6
If you can't remember the circle of 5ths, you can cheat.
Visualize your fretboard, and imagine where you'd play a C. 5th string, 3rd fret. So you've got your first note. Now, to get your second note, go down a 4th. You've the the G on the 6th string.
Now to get your next note, go up a 5th. You're on the 5th fret, 5th string, playing a D.

So you've got C, G, D...
Keep going down a 4th then up a 5th on your bottom 2 strings to complete the circle. C G D A E B F# C# G# D# A# F and back to C.
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