#1
Right, so i wanna refinish my old squier
I read the sticky things and they helped a lot.....
But i THINK my squier has a polyurethane finish and according to some of the sites, that means i don't have to rub back to the wood?
Is this correct? And if so, do i just have to rub back to the old coat of paint, then primer over that?
And how do i know for sure how far back to rub then? Cos i've been rubbing at it, with wet and dry paper and the 'shininess' so to speak has disappeared, but i'm not sure when it would be safe to go ahead with primering.

Help?
Quote by jxljxl
If UG had a Facebook style Relationship thing, I'd e-marry you C-mak


Quote by jxljxl
I want C-mak in my bum.


^Think he might have a thing for me...
#2
I'm pretty sure you do. I did this to mine, and just used a heat gun. Because squires have such thick (crappy) clear coats, you can peel the paint off like elmers glue.
Suhr Custom, Flaxwood Rautia or Grosh Tele thru
HBE Medicine Bawl Wah
Analogman BiComp
Texas Two Step OD
Fulltone Ultimate Octave/Fuzz
Boss CE-2
TC Nova Delay
SLO-100, 65 London or Bogner Shiva
Ask me about any of this stuff!
#3
Well, if its poly, you can sand all the clearcoat off, then apply your primer, it will suffice, but never be awesome. ive refinishedabout 6 guitars this past 2 months in my shop, and i can vouch for this. sand it all off, it will be well worth it. if it is laquer YOU MUST AND IT ALL, laquer melts into laquer, so if you sprayed black on top of red, you would get dark red splotches everywhere, noway to fix it.

Sand it all off, finish sand it (150 grit, 220 grit, whipe it with water to raise the grain 220 grit again, whipe it with water again, 320 grit, whipe it, 320 grit again. mix some tightbond-wood glue with water, 50/50. whipe the whole guitar body in that, then give it 3 hours to dry, sand that with 320 grit, then you are ready for your primer).

primer color depends on your paint color, dark paint = dark grey primer, light paint = light primer.

once you primer, wetsand it with 800-1000 grit wet-dry sandpaper, get out all the imperfections, assuming you dont sand through it, you can now apply your color coat. apply 3-5 coats of color, wetsand any runs or blems out. apply 10-15 coats of clearcoat polyurethane, wet sand that with 1200 grit, get all the orange peel out, you will be ableto se it when you hold it up against the light. assuming you didnt sand-through, you acn now buff it with some polishing compound and a big buff-wheel, then you are done. whole process takes about 30 hours for a professional looking job, out of your house anyways.
#4
Hmmmm, thats a lot more than i thought
And it looks like I've gone about this COMPLETELY the wrong way....
I've already started to sand it (all the shininess has gone) with P1200 wet and dry paper. Could this cause problems? :/
And so you all suggest i go all the way back to the wood?
Quote by jxljxl
If UG had a Facebook style Relationship thing, I'd e-marry you C-mak


Quote by jxljxl
I want C-mak in my bum.


^Think he might have a thing for me...
#5
its your guitar bro, if you want it to look like ****, leave the paint on, if you want a really-good finish and everything ,go about the way i said. just be prepared for alot of work, thats why finish-work in the luthier world pays tons, almost 80-100 dollars a guitar for a nitro-lacquer finish.
#6
OK, cheers man
Looks like I'll be sanding back to the wood then.....
Quote by jxljxl
If UG had a Facebook style Relationship thing, I'd e-marry you C-mak


Quote by jxljxl
I want C-mak in my bum.


^Think he might have a thing for me...