#1
I've found that singing over my Seagull Original S6 and its dreadnought body is becoming increasingly difficult. I have to really belt it out to get over the guitar. So, I'm thinking of trying some Silk & Steel strings to not only lower my volume but also to ease fingerpicking.

What is everyone's experience with these strings on a dreadnought body?
Sincerely, Chad.
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#2
I had a friend who uses them exclusively on his Tak, and I'm very "meh" about them. They mellow out the sound too much, in my opinion, and when you combine that with the cedar top of your guitar, I'm pretty sure I would like them less.

tbh, i would either play your guitar quieter (which is often as easy as loosening your grip on your pick) or learning better singing technique. I have never had a problem singing over a 6-string guitar (12-string? well, i have to be light handed on that)...and since I'm guessing you aren't performing truly unplugged often, I wouldn't want to sacrifice the tone (that you seem to enjoy a great deal) of my guitar.


edit: are those actually nylon??? or something? i don't think the are what i was thinking of...the ones i'm talking about had silk wrapped around the part of the string that transversed the bridge.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#3
Don't. Those are nylon strings and meant for a classical guitar, you won't get a good sound out of your guitar as yours is meant for steel strings. Try putting a lighter gauge string on your guitar, maybe some 10's. Also try various strumming techniques to get a softer sound, it can make a world of difference.

Edit: Also try just using your thumb, or a finger or 2 to strum, instead of a pick. Helps lower the volume drastically.
Last edited by KSUGuy at Feb 21, 2008,
#4
Quote by roamingbard13
I had a friend who uses them exclusively on his Tak, and I'm very "meh" about them. They mellow out the sound too much, in my opinion, and when you combine that with the cedar top of your guitar, I'm pretty sure I would like them less.

tbh, i would either play your guitar quieter (which is often as easy as loosening your grip on your pick) or learning better singing technique. I have never had a problem singing over a 6-string guitar (12-string? well, i have to be light handed on that)...and since I'm guessing you aren't performing truly unplugged often, I wouldn't want to sacrifice the tone (that you seem to enjoy a great deal) of my guitar.


edit: are those actually nylon??? or something? i don't think the are what i was thinking of...the ones i'm talking about had silk wrapped around the part of the string that transversed the bridge.

They're a nylon/steel composite. Something like a steel core with a nylon shell, and the whole thing is wrapped in silver plated copper. Also, I am performing completely unplugged. Obviously, I have no problem singing if I have a microphone; I just don't use them very often in the coffee house setting.

Quote by KSUGuy
Don't. Those are nylon strings and meant for a classical guitar, you won't get a good sound out of your guitar as yours is meant for steel strings. Try putting a lighter gauge string on your guitar, maybe some 10's. Also try various strumming techniques to get a softer sound, it can make a world of difference.

Edit: Also try just using your thumb, or a finger or 2 to strum, instead of a pick. Helps lower the volume drastically.

I know damn well the difference between nylon and steel strings, and these are not nylon strings. They are not meant for a classical guitar, they are meant for a folk-style body. Do your research before throwing out an answer.

Well, I guess I'll just try and switch to ultralights or something. Oh well.
Sincerely, Chad.
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LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#5
Hey Chad. Before you buy ultralights, give the S&S's a go. I just finished off a set of them and they are really nice strings. The silk core does indeed help to knock down a bit of volume if you have a loud dreadnaught. The part that impressed me the most about them was how well they held their tune. I had a work week from hell a ways back, and wasn't able to pick up my guitars for that whole week (shame shame shame). When I did pick it up, it was still dead on in tune! I didn't even need to tweak the strings it was so right on.
The key to installing those is pre-stretching them. Get them all strung up onto the guitar and before you start to bring up the tension, start stretching them out. The B and high E are standard, so treat those as normal. But the others benefit from this.
Tune up about half way, then stretch them again. Tune up close to standard, say to within a half step. Stretch again.
It sounds tedious, but is worth it for these particular strings. They have a very nice tone because of the silvered steel outer wrap. Kinda bell like with good sustain, although not as much as all metal strings.
#6
Quote by LeftyDave
It sounds tedious, but is worth it for these particular strings. They have a very nice tone because of the silvered steel outer wrap. Kinda bell like with good sustain, although not as much as all metal strings.

Thanks for the info, LD. I'll definitely give them a go, now. The stretching ritual doesn't seem tedious to me, since I do it with my Ernie Ball Super Slinkies on all my electrics. How long do they last? Do the windings corrode very fast? I polish my strings with a polishing cloth (forget the name of it, but you can buy it in yards at JoAnn) to extend their life, anyways.

Thanks for the help
Sincerely, Chad.
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#7
Martin Silk and Steels are made with a core of steel, wrapped by strands of silk, then wrapped again by the outer wrap of silvered steel. There is no nylon in them for those of you above who think so. They are a bit more stretchy than an all metal set of acoustic strings, which is why they need to be treated more like nylons for a classical in respect to restringing. Installed properly, and properly pre-stretched, they will hold their tune very well.
#8
Quote by Chad48309
Thanks for the info, LD. I'll definitely give them a go, now. The stretching ritual doesn't seem tedious to me, since I do it with my Ernie Ball Super Slinkies on all my electrics. How long do they last? Do the windings corrode very fast? I polish my strings with a polishing cloth (forget the name of it, but you can buy it in yards at JoAnn) to extend their life, anyways.

Thanks for the help


I got close to 2 months out of my set. Remember, there was an entire week in there that I didn't play it too. I think you'll like them.
#9
Quote by LeftyDave
Martin Silk and Steels are made with a core of steel, wrapped by strands of silk, then wrapped again by the outer wrap of silvered steel. There is no nylon in them for those of you above who think so. They are a bit more stretchy than an all metal set of acoustic strings, which is why they need to be treated more like nylons for a classical in respect to restringing. Installed properly, and properly pre-stretched, they will hold their tune very well.

Do you know if the D'Addario Silk & Steels are any different, other than the $4 in price?
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#11
Quote by LeftyDave
Sorry no. I used the Martin's.

Right, well, I guess I'll try those, then. Thanks for all the help.
Sincerely, Chad.
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LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#12
OOH tanks for this thread, i've been trying to get a bit more information on these strings (the martins)
I have a pack in my room but i havent put them on yet (will do when I next restring)
I'm mainly worred about the strings tarnishing, the wierd thing baout silver isthat it doesnt tarnish if you wear it all the time. So maybe the strings will benefit from being played often? idk, im just throwing ideas around here
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#13
Since they're guitar strings, they're going to tarnish eventually anyway, no matter what you do to prevent it. Contaminants from your fingers is the primary cause. Those oils and acids from your sweat will do it. But there's things you can do to prolong the life of your strings, like wiping them down after each session. Lubricate them too with something like FingerEase. The strings are metal, the frets are metal, so lubing them helps a lot too. Storing the guitar in a case when it's not being played is another helper. Contaminants from the air alone will attack the strings. I'm guitly of not doing this last thing myself. My new Gibson SG is just too pretty and I like to show it off for friends who come over, but it get's too dusty that way.