#1
wouldnt it be more difficult to play on one since the finger board is now farther from your fingers and if you press too hard you'll bend the note too high? i dont see whats so special. is it one of those "you have to try it to understand" kinda things?
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Quote by tuwyci
why are metal musicians prone to fatness?
Cause there music is heavy.


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#2
Have you ever played one? Like butta', ... like butta.

But seriously, I tried fooling around on a YJM Sig and it was pure bliss (although I was playing upside down, I still got the jist of what it's like).
#3
Noo you press light as the string only needs contact to the metal frets. Lighter playing usually means faster playing

if you press harder you actually bend the string. Its similar to guitars with XJ size frets really.
#4
ya it is, my friend has a Malmsteen sig, and he loves it soo much, he also has a guitar thats custom made, and he didn't like the neck, so he bought another one, and he still didn't like it, so he just scalopped teh frets (himself) and he loves it, it's kinda an aquired taste i guess, i still haven't tried either of them, he's really over protective, just those two guitars are about $8000 combined
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#5
You dont need to press the string all the way to the fingerboard, just past the fret.
#6
Quote by OneRust
You dont need to press the string all the way to the fingerboard, just past the fret.


no ****, but people with smaller frets (me) are used to their hand sliding on the fretboard whilst doing full/unison bends.
Quote by cakeandpiemofo
Quote by tuwyci
why are metal musicians prone to fatness?
Cause there music is heavy.


Writing music is hard D:
#7
I don't think many of you understand the concept of scalloping.

It has nothing to do with action, speed, or if if makes it easier to play. It doesn't matter if you have extra jumbo frets, or small frets, you still have to push the string to the fret to chord it. The action is going to always be the same height over those frets. You don't have to push down lighter nor harder with Xjumbo, medium or scalloped necks because you're pushing the strings the same distance.

What a scalloped neck gives you is a different feel. If you are a more relaxed player you will find the scalloped neck gives you more control over accents such as bending, and vibratos.

Scalloping if anything slows you down until you get used to it, then you're at the same speed as usual.
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#8
I never found it difficult, I tried a Malmsteen Strat and it wasn't all that different in feel.
#9
Quote by MESAexplorer
I don't think many of you understand the concept of scalloping.

It has nothing to do with action, speed, or if if makes it easier to play. It doesn't matter if you have extra jumbo frets, or small frets, you still have to push the string to the fret to chord it. The action is going to always be the same height over those frets. You don't have to push down lighter nor harder with Xjumbo, medium or scalloped necks because you're pushing the strings the same distance.

What a scalloped neck gives you is a different feel. If you are a more relaxed player you will find the scalloped neck gives you more control over accents such as bending, and vibratos.

Scalloping if anything slows you down until you get used to it, then you're at the same speed as usual.

You hit the nail on the head.

That said, I would not advise a fully scalloped neck unless you have the lightest touch on earth. This is because it makes it very hard to do chords without bending them sharp. I love the feel of a neck though that is scalloped very gently around the 7th, and gets deeper the further down you go.