#1
I've got two main questions here. To start, I've asked how to improve my improvising and I was told to learn the pentatonic shapes. I've done so, and it did improve my improvising. However, when I improvise using those scales, it sounds very bluesy. I was wondering what sort of scale I should learn in order to improvise in a more metal style.

As for the second part, while it improved my improvising, I'm still not able to play what I hear in my head, which I didn't entirely expect to be doing just yet. However, when I improvise, I'm concentrating mainly on playing notes within the scale, and so I'm barely even thinking about where I want it to go, and I end up just mindlessly playing notes, with my only control being whether they go higher or lower. I don't know if that made any sense, but I guess what I'm asking is that, at some point, will I be able to stop concentrating on the notes as much and just play what I hear in my head?
My band, Escher
My progressive rock project, Mosaic

Quote by Lappo
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#2
Aural training is the single most effective thing you can do to improve your improvisation. Focus on memorizing the sounds of different intervals, and being able to recognize them when they're played for you. Hum or sing a melody and then practice playing perfectly on your guitar. You'll find that you can improvise much better with your voice than you can with the guitar.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Also, drift away from the most basic pentatonic shapes and the minor pentatonics, those are the most bluesy-sounding ones.

Adding palm-muting, pinch harmonics, and sweep picking patterns will add to the metal tone you're in search of.
#4
Okay, I have very limited theory knowledge, and what I do know I've learned from a book, so what I'm about to say may be totally wrong, but as I understand it, an interval is the distance between two notes, and in order to have distance between notes, you have to have two notes at the same time, a chord. Is that right or am I missing something?
My band, Escher
My progressive rock project, Mosaic

Quote by Lappo
clearly, the goal is to convert every thread into a discussion about BTBAM

BTBAM IS ALWAYS RELEVANT
#5
Quote by GodofCheesecake
Okay, I have very limited theory knowledge, and what I do know I've learned from a book, so what I'm about to say may be totally wrong, but as I understand it, an interval is the distance between two notes, and in order to have distance between notes, you have to have two notes at the same time, a chord. Is that right or am I missing something?


An interval is the distance between two notes, yes, but the notes don't have to be played at the same time. If I play a C and then a G, the distance between them is still a perfect fifth, even though I played them one at a time.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
As for playing what you hear in your head for "Improvising"....... Lifetime. Seriously...... there's a lot of famous guitarists out there who can Really play but only a handful of them can really truly improvise in that manner. But usually what you hear in your head is a combination of familiar licks and "phrases".....mixed in with new transitions and bridge segments.

Once you learn enough "licks", "phrases" and theory..... you'll basically begin building your "Arsenal". Basically like a vocabulary for language. If you were to ask most guitar players in bands they would tell you that for most lead solos they write and record there's Lots of behind the scene time experimenting with small segments and licks before they come up with the right combination of parts to build a really killer solo.

Seeing a player live several times will clue you in to how they tweak and change leads to keep them fresh...... you don't want to play the same thing over and over again the same way.

Slash worked in this manner a lot...... recorded something like 60 separate Phrases and pieces originally in order to pick and piece together the Solo for Sweet Child o' Mine.

"Feel" and "Style" of a solo when it comes to something described as "Metal"...... typically is going to boil down to the Mode and any alterations to the basic semi-tones you play under. Lots of players play using the basic Pentatonic Shapes.... then sprinkle notes in and out of them to spice it up a bit...... Slash, Joe Perry, Page..... all primarily Bluesy Pentatonic players but had some extra kick.

I'd say learn the CAGED chord theory for Minor chords and their relative scales and patterns..... and maybe check out the Minor Modes. Then you can experiment with what sounds more metal.
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#7
Quote by GodofCheesecake
Okay, I have very limited theory knowledge, and what I do know I've learned from a book, so what I'm about to say may be totally wrong, but as I understand it, an interval is the distance between two notes, and in order to have distance between notes, you have to have two notes at the same time, a chord. Is that right or am I missing something?


to add if i am not mistaken a chord has to have at least three notes?

fell free to correct me if i am wrong
song stuck in my head today


#9
Quote by Kentris.5
That's correct. An interval is two notes, a regular chord is three. Then you get stuff like add9 or 7 and you have more than three notes in the mix.


A triad is three. A chord can most certainly have more.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Hum or sing a melody and then practice playing perfectly on your guitar. You'll find that you can improvise much better with your voice than you can with the guitar.


It is no accident that many great improvisers (Oscar Peterson and Keith Jarret come to mind first) hummed/hum or sung/sing while they improvised/improvise (past and present corresponding respectively, RIP Oscar). Archeo Avis's advice is good, and I would take it, and even extend it to other areas of my playing (such as when reading music, sing along with your playing.) Not only will you develop a decent voice, but by singing you eliminate a great deal of the abstraction involved in playing, thus rendering your playing more effective.