#1
I hear sometimes that an electric guitar can play faster than an acoustic. all ive been playing since i started( about 8 months ago) was an acoustic. Im doing fine with basic chords, but when it comes to improvising, it sounds sloppy and too slow. Would an electric guitar make me faster and smoother?
#3
so when do you think will be a good time to get an electric? after how many months?
#4
no, practicing does that,

however you may prefer the feel of an electric guitar play one and find out
#6
I started on acoustic too. It's true what bangoodcharlotte says, after your fingers are used to playing on an acoustic, you'll have no troubles switching to electric, in fact it will be quite a bit easier most likely. Also, I got my first electric after 10/12 months or so, but there's no real time that's best. It's good to play both, you get different sounds so they're good for different songs.
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#7
its better to learn on an acoustic because its harder on your fingers than an electric

also, if you can improvise on an acoustic smoothly, then playing an electric will be even easier (practice practice practice!)
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#8
it depends on what you want to play,

learn how to play acoustic, then switch to electric.

but try to aproach electric in a different way as it takes a more delicate touch.
treat it as a different instrument to learn.

I ran in to problems when a first started playing electric. I was pushing to hard on the strings and making them go sharp.
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#9
I've been playing for about 3 years now and when I sit down and play my acoustic and then pick up my electric its easier to play faster. One because the action is lower on electric and the neck is better but that's just what I have to say
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#10
Playing the electric guitar is a lot different. You have to learn to mute the notes after u play them or it just sounds like a mess. So when u start u might be a little dissapointed at first but ur fingers soon learn what to do.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It will, but learn how to play on an acoustic. It's like running 2 miles to prepare for a 1 mile race.


+1, ever since i bought my acoustic i do most all of my practicing on it.
#12
Quote by newaccount
I hear sometimes that an electric guitar can play faster than an acoustic. all ive been playing since i started( about 8 months ago) was an acoustic. Im doing fine with basic chords, but when it comes to improvising, it sounds sloppy and too slow. Would an electric guitar make me faster and smoother?

yes and no. i play about the same on both because i use the same size strings on both. but with electric its still a little easier for somethings. and the action is easier to adjust so that can help.

for the average person, electric will help with speed because of smaller strings. there is less force needed to play them so you can go faster, easier. but you can play just as fast on an acoustic. it just takes more effort and practice. but it can be done.
#13
Though what I'm about to say has probably been stated already, it'll reinforce what's already been said. All that distortion does is hides you mistakes, and people tend to use distortion when they plug a guitar in. Let's face it, it's part of the appeal...

Anyway, that said, playing the acoustic guitar is much better if you want to have good technique. You can't do bends and vibratos and things like that as easily, but just straight speed and technique will be built best on an acoustic. You don't like the way you sound when you play sloppily, do you? Playing on an instrument that shows all of your mistakes, hiding nothing, should motivate you to play better. It did for me when I was doing it all the time on the acoustic.
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#14
^I disagree about gain hiding your mistakes. Sure if you're using a stupid amount of gain it'll hide them, but if you're using the amount of gain that you should be (read: less), then it will actually amplify mistakes such as bad muting technique.
#15
well i dont know about you but for me... the Washburn guitar i have is just as easy to play as any electric iv held and since i learnt on my washburn its alittle easier for me to play on it without messing up. (Go washburn!)
#16
Quote by which ones pink
^I disagree about gain hiding your mistakes. Sure if you're using a stupid amount of gain it'll hide them, but if you're using the amount of gain that you should be (read: less), then it will actually amplify mistakes such as bad muting technique.


this is what I have found as well...

A lot of players turn their gain up WAY to high, so that the music actually loses dynamics, and becomes VERY muddy sounding... then because the sound is already so muddy, it "hides" mistakes but.... its not actually, because the fact that the tone is **** is the basic mistake to begin with.

but when properly set up for a guitar player (proper gain is the maximum amount a player can have while still having control over the dynamics of his music) the gain will actually amplify and expose bad technique. Eric Johnson Covered that in his video (I can't think of the title right now, my DVD collection is huge and don't wanna hunt for the title)

that said playing without an amp is extremely valuable.

1. It cant be loud enough to damage your ears.
2. It insures that you will be sounding the notes you play clearly because if you don't sound them clearly then you wont be able to hear them where as on an amplified guitar you will still be able to hear them, just it wont sound as good.
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#17
The main difference is the width of the neck, so an electric won't MAKE you faster, but it will inspire you to play faster, and naturally make you lean in that direction, I'd say....

Yeah, distortion can cover some mistakes, but as far as sweep picking goes, it amplifies the **** out of mistakes.... I remember I had a triad sweep nailed on my acoustic, then I switched over to my Ibanez and was like... "Ummmm.... heh-heh...... no....."
#18
I'd say learn to play what you're going to be playing on. When I was 11 my parents bought me an acoustic (I loved rock like Alice Cooper and ACDC at the time) and because it was difficult and it didn't sound like what I wanted I gave up. Then 5 years later I got an electric and found it was very easy to obsess over... Even though it was still hard it sounded like what I wanted (metal!).
Another thing is the feel of an acoustic is different to an electric (neck is generally wider, action isn't as low, strings are thicker) so it could cause you to miss notes and press too hard when you're playing an electric.

And finally the gear related bit: if you get really good on an acoustic and start playing electric you're probably not going to know how to get a good tone out of your gear so that won't exactly motivate you a ton.
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#19
It's true that it will let you play faster; but I would wait at least twelve months before you pick up an electric, and when you do, I reccommend a Gibson SG.
#20
^
I love SGs for how thin the necks are. They don't have much width, and it's incredibly easy to play fast **** on them. I would go with that. The only problem is that Gibson quality is going down and I'm not too sure of if an SG is worth $ 1100 bucks...
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#21
i use a metal zone, it gives me the evil sound i like. that being said it WILL "hide" sloppy playing HOWEVER if you sit 2 guitarists down with it and one plays cleanly and the other sloppily you can definatly tell the difference. personally i like sh!t ton of distortion on my stuff (in fact with a metal zone i dunno if theres any option but a ton of distortion)
#22
If you wanna have great picking technique, that is really fast and clean, learn to shred on acoustic. On the electric, its easy to hide bad picking since legato sounds just as good if your accuracy in fretting is good.
#23
^
The only thing that's really hard to do develop on an acoustic guitar (or atleast mine) is good vibrato. But that's only a small setback for what you'd probably gain.
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#24
If you're playing faster, it's at the cost of technique - i.e. if you're playing sloppy and slow on acoustic, it'll still be sloppy on electric, but you can probably play faster.
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#25
its not the guitar that'll make you faster, its the matter of practicing that'll get you there.
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#26
Quote by newaccount
I hear sometimes that an electric guitar can play faster than an acoustic. all ive been playing since i started( about 8 months ago) was an acoustic. Im doing fine with basic chords, but when it comes to improvising, it sounds sloppy and too slow. Would an electric guitar make me faster and smoother?


In a word: NO


the main reason you sound sloppy and too slow, is because you've only been playing for 8 months. That will still be the case on the electric. Getting an electric may be good though, as it will allow you to play the music that you are probably into listening to. That would be a better reason for switching.... your still going to be sloppy and slow at 1st, just like now.
It takes years to get good. practice, be patient.... get a quality guitar that sounds and plays well and is suitable for the kind of music you want to play.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 24, 2008,
#27
Probably, an electric guitar can make you play faster because:

An acoustic guitar has a thick body, which can make your picking hand less relaxed while the electric guitar has the opposite

-and-

Most low-quality acoustic guitars have strings far from the fret board, which will make your fretting hand less relaxed, while most electric guitars are opposite of it.

Based from my experience, these are the differences in an acoustic and electric guitar that can affect your speed.
Last edited by domenic_665 at Feb 24, 2008,
#28
It could. Electrics have thinner necks, smaller bodies, and they're easier to play.

But you wont pick up an electric and just be 10x better all of a sudden.
#29
I think acoustic vs electric is pretty much a wash. Play the one that fits the music
you like.

There's a certain truth to the acoustic building up your fingers, but that effect is
a pretty minor consideration. You can also get into the bad habit of trying to
fret the strings too hard. Electric is definitely easier and as a beginner you already
have so much to overcome and learn you might as well make it easier on yourself.
I'd tend to favor the electric over acoustic for beginners.