#1
What scales should I know? I was looking through some and there are a whole bunch I couldn't even say. Is there ones I should know more then others?
#2
A minor scale, and A minor pentatonic scale. Knowing these will give you the ability to apply the pattern to any key like B, C, D, E, F, G etc...

For every key the pattern/picture(wateva you want to call it) stays the same but the position and the root changes on each key. Such as G minor is the same pattern as A minor but 2 frets down. That's the beginner way of thinking of it anyway.
#3
Learn how to spell your major and minor scales using intervals. It's easy to learn and things will start to fall in place after that.
Irrelevant quote from obscure person
Obnoxious statement regarding size of e-ween
Italicized text indicating bandwagoning masquerading as deep thought
ASCII graphic that will take over the world if you put one in your signature
Made up statistic
#4
Thanks =]

Btw, I'm intermediate. So you can suggest harder scales. ^^
#5
Quote by Ze_Metal
Thanks =]

Btw, I'm intermediate. So you can suggest harder scales. ^^


Scales are scales, there's no "easier" or "harder"...besides, you may think you're an intermediate player but you're a complete beginner when it comes to theory so you need to start at the beginning.

Learn the notes on the fretboard, learn the major scale and take it from there.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#6
Quote by steven seagull
Scales are scales, there's no "easier" or "harder"...besides, you may think you're an intermediate player but you're a complete beginner when it comes to theory so you need to start at the beginning.

Learn the notes on the fretboard, learn the major scale and take it from there.


Pentatonics are much easier then other scales. So I would say there is a difference.
And I do know most of the notes on the fretboard.

Tbh, most people don't start learning theory until they are intermediate anyways...
#7
Most people start off with basic chords, scales and fretboard knowledge lol. They probably don't really find a use for it until they're about intermediate level but its still important to know if you ever want to write/impro your own stuff.
Xbox Live tag: Dream Away Rain
Add!

Quote by marko'd
dont sweat how quick your progressing, i heard that Jimi hendrix didnt get his legendary guitar skills until he was dead


Quote by Dreadnought
+ MOTHERFUCKIN' 1
#8
Yeah, I just need to learn more scales and I'll be good on theory.
#9
Get your scales right, then modes You can do just a scale or two at first like the Pentatonic/harmonic minor/the majors/minors.. Do all the modes. That'll help you write music/solo/impro etc.
#10
Quote by Ze_Metal
Pentatonics are much easier then other scales. So I would say there is a difference.
And I do know most of the notes on the fretboard.

Tbh, most people don't start learning theory until they are intermediate anyways...

No they aren't, there's not really much difference between learning 5 notes and learning 7 - it's not like we're talking telephone numbers there. If you don't know ALL the notes on the fretboard then you aren't in a position to learn any theory.

There's no "levels" in guitar either, it's not a video game.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Quote by steven seagull
No they aren't, there's not really much difference between learning 5 notes and learning 7 - it's not like we're talking telephone numbers there. If you don't know ALL the notes on the fretboard then you aren't in a position to learn any theory.

There's no "levels" in guitar either, it's not a video game.


So if there isn't different "levels" then that means all songs are the same from smoke on the water to "House of mirrors"?

Of course there is.
#12
Quote by steven seagull
Scales are scales, there's no "easier" or "harder"...besides, you may think you're an intermediate player but you're a complete beginner when it comes to theory so you need to start at the beginning.

Learn the notes on the fretboard, learn the major scale and take it from there.


I disagree, IMO some scales ARE harder than others, by definition if a scale has 5 notes and another has 7 notes then there is more to learn. Also some scales you only play 2 notes per string, other scales you play more, therefore.....more to remember!
My gear:
Fender 50th anniv American Strat Deluxe NICE
Fender Eric johnson Strat SEXY
Gibson SG Special Gothic II RAW
Ibanez JS 1000 VERSATILE
Gibson Les Paul Custom OOH BABY
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Head & Cab LET'S ROCK
#13
Pentatonics sre very helpful and work with everything. Major scales are very useful aswell. Learn those and combine them with picking techniques to improve.
#14
Quote by Hammy
I disagree, IMO some scales ARE harder than others, by definition if a scale has 5 notes and another has 7 notes then there is more to learn. Also some scales you only play 2 notes per string, other scales you play more, therefore.....more to remember!


Yes...see?

Also I forgot to mention, some scales require you to switch your position making it harder to play smoothly/faster.
#15
Quote by Ben Wright
Pentatonics sre very helpful and work with everything. Major scales are very useful aswell. Learn those and combine them with picking techniques to improve.


Thanks =]

Yeah I've been working on Alternate picking, it's such a pain.
#16
I don't know how you could consider yourself intermediate and know at least a scale or two. And you're still working on alternate picking?

Hmm
#17
Quote by Ze_Metal
Thanks =]

Yeah I've been working on Alternate picking, it's such a pain.

No problem. Yeah thats what I did too. I started playing each note in the pentatonic scale 4 times using alternate picking. Once I'd nailed that I changed to playing 2 notes with alternate picking and so on and so forth until eventually I picked up alternate picking. Just practice, practice, practice really.
#18
Quote by dreemweaver
I don't know how you could consider yourself intermediate and know at least a scale or two. And you're still working on alternate picking?

Hmm


I know quite a few scales actually, I wanted to know which scales I should know.

And, There is a lot of intermediate players who are just learning to Alt.Pick. I consider myself Intermediate Not because of my speed, but because I'm not sloppy, I can play 1 and a half advanced songs cleanly(If it matters)and I learned in a different order then most people would guess so I guess that's why I'm starting alt. picking

If I'm not intermediate then I'm close.

I guess I can sweep pick a little to, only 4 arpeggios about 65 bmp though. I'll work on that later.
Last edited by Ze_Metal at Feb 21, 2008,
#19
Quote by Hammy
I disagree, IMO some scales ARE harder than others, by definition if a scale has 5 notes and another has 7 notes then there is more to learn. Also some scales you only play 2 notes per string, other scales you play more, therefore.....more to remember!

You're talking about fingering patterns for certain scales as opposed to scales themselves, they're not the same thing.


Quote by Ze_Metal
Yes...see?

Also I forgot to mention, some scales require you to switch your position making it harder to play smoothly/faster.


Again, see above. You need to understand what a scale actually is before trying to learn them.

Quote by Ze_Metal
So if there isn't different "levels" then that means all songs are the same from smoke on the water to "House of mirrors"?

Of course there is.


Some pieces are harder than others but that doesn't equate to measureable levels...there's no such thing as "beginner" or "intermediate" songs really, only things you can play and things you can't.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#20
What are you talking about "Understand what a scale is"?

It's a series of notes used to compose music? Uh...

Why do you go on everyones thread and just make smart comments? I've seen a few of your posts on here, only ones that helped someone (From what I saw) was the "Memorizing the fretboard" Steps that you posted.

All the other ones (That I saw) were pretty much just smart comments.


I'm all for contributive input, but not contributive input of people guessing others abilities.
#21
Ze Metal, read the "learn your theory" link in my thread. Learn it by doing the following:
1. Read the entire thing.
2. read the entire thing again.
3. Ask yourself what you don't understand.
4. Read it again and try to figure out what you don't get.
5. Ask me any remaining questions in this thread. Be specific when you ask. I do not respond to "I don't get it."
#23
Wait...I already read that today =S I read it once a week tbh.

It's just a lot to take in.
Last edited by Ze_Metal at Feb 21, 2008,
#25
Yeah, I've learned a lot from that particular guide. But Somewhere about 3/4 in I just get totally lost.
#27
Well, The creating chord sections. Then inversions.

That's pretty much what I don't understand. Everything else I'm alrite on, I'm still new to it but I have a general idea.
#28
So a scale can be defined by its intervals. If you see 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7, you know that it is a natural minor scale of some sort. Whether it is A B C D E F G (A minor) or E F# G A B C D (E minor), it still follows the same set of intervals.

A completely unaltered scale is called the natural major scale; its intervals are 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. Learn this...well. Everything else is based from it. You see those minor scales above? The flattened notes are relative to the parallel major scale (A and E natural major are the paralle major scales to A and E natural minor). To form chords, you take a few notes based on the intervals given. If you want to play a G chord, you take the G natural major scale and look at the 1 3 and 5 intervals, G B D. Play those all at once.

Inversions are really easy once you get them. An inversion simply means that the root note, 1, is not the lowest note in pitch. An uninverted G chord is G B D. An inversion would have B or D as the lowest note.

Hope this helps.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Feb 21, 2008,
#30
listen:

there are 12 different notes on your guitar. no more, no less. there are different pitches for these notes, but they are the same notes. it's all about just maing different spaces between your notes on the way from the bottom to the top. a major scale is the most often reffered to, and it's a good place to start. but it just ONE way to make a scale. a scale is a very abstract concept, it's just about the way that you construct your scale.

pick a chord - play every string on the chord (E major for example). what are the notes on each string? once you know this, you know chord construction, because the intervals for this chord are the same for every major chord. do the same for other chords, and you will know how every chord is constructed, and how to use this in your playing.

theory is simple if you just make it simple.
A fool is not one who makes a mistake, a fool is one who does not learn from it.
-me HAH!
#31
That's a different way to look at it, or atleast I never looked at it like that.

Actually, I know all the notes on the fretboard very well.

One way I practice my fretboard knowledge is redoing riffs different ways. So I practice notes a lot.
#32
Quote by Ze_Metal
What are you talking about "Understand what a scale is"?

It's a series of notes used to compose music? Uh...

Why do you go on everyones thread and just make smart comments? I've seen a few of your posts on here, only ones that helped someone (From what I saw) was the "Memorizing the fretboard" Steps that you posted.

All the other ones (That I saw) were pretty much just smart comments.


I'm all for contributive input, but not contributive input of people guessing others abilities.


I make lots of helpful posts, there's just been an awful lot of stupid questions lately.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#33
What may seem stupid to you, might not be stupid to others.
#34
in my guitar lessons, I learned all the major scales and their relative minors. That's a start for ya.

Also minor and major penatonic are great for doing solo's, check those out!
#36
Quote by Ze_Metal
What may seem stupid to you, might not be stupid to others.

I dunno, I have a pretty accurate stupid detector. For the record your question wasn't particularly stupid...I did tell you to start with the major scale and also pointed out that there's a distinction between scales and scale patterns.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#37
well that's what a scale is, it's a pattern that is repeated and stayed in. looking at scales as c maj c relative minor c phrygian is backwards for trying to teach yourself, they are all just different patterns of going from your root to your octave. just look at what is there.
A fool is not one who makes a mistake, a fool is one who does not learn from it.
-me HAH!
#38
Yeah Actually, This week I learned a lot.

From what I've read, the major scale is w-w-h-w-w-w-h. I learned this awhile ago but to make a scale say... C major?

I would start on a C So...*Thinks* I could start on the 8th fret E string right? Then a whole which would be D, then another whole is E, then half is F.

Doing it on different strings of course.

Is that correct?
#39
yes, do that and then do a C bar chord on the 8th fret - where does this fall in relation to the scale you just played? you now know chord construction. with this, you can see the little fancy sounding things you can play around the chord staying in that scale.

just pick a position for your C chord, and run through a C scale in that position. make the chord minor, 7th, anything, and you can see where this fits in relation to all the notes in C.
A fool is not one who makes a mistake, a fool is one who does not learn from it.
-me HAH!