#2
One might think basswood would be the best wood for a bass..
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#3
Just, no.

It is the wood which would help contribute to the sound that you want. The wood massively affects the sound fo the bass. People have different opinions on what make good tone. Therefore, there is no best.

Hell, basswood is generally regarded as pretty poor as a body wood. But the Musicman Bongo uses it and sounds fantastic. However, most basses with it don't sound good at all.
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#4
Quote by gm jack
Just, no.

It is the wood which would help contribute to the sound that you want. The wood massively affects the sound fo the bass. People have different opinions on what make good tone. Therefore, there is no best.

Hell, basswood is generally regarded as pretty poor as a body wood. But the Musicman Bongo uses it and sounds fantastic. However, most basses with it don't sound good at all.


That was a joke, by the way, incase you considered regarding me as a complete idiot for my post.
We've drained full confession booths, polluted drinking wells with our repentances, and then stood grinning with our arms around the shoulder of a rotting child.



If you resist change, you will be here forever.
#5
fender uses alder or ash, musicman uses "select hardwoods" basically mean alder i believe, gibson uses mahogany.

i'd say go with alder but it depends on the tone you're after
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#6
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That was a joke, by the way, incase you considered regarding me as a complete idiot for my post.

I lol'd.

I'm gonna say use ash, mainly because that's what I'm using on my build. :P
#8
Quote by Deliriumbassist

Tone Woods

Well, all sorts of basses are made of all sorts of woods. What are the best ones for you? Well, I think it'd be in a better context if I divide this section into 2 parts - budget bass tone wood, and bass tone wood.

Budget Bass Tone wood

Getting cheap wood is a huge way to cut down the cost of a bass. However, the cheaper your wood gets, the less character and detail your tone has. Let me go over some of the types of cheaper tone wood

Agathis: A common wood found on many Squier basses. I've read somewhere that it's related to the mahogany tree, but tonally, there are very few similarities. It's quite tonally neutral - there's not a lot of character or nuance detail. It doesn't have any particular strong qualities, but sounds a bit livelier than some of the other budget tone woods. It can be heavy, and that could slide the neutral tone into one with some low-end heft. However, it's not quite as clear as some of the more expensive woods. This wood is considered to be a cheap substitution of Alder and tonally could be considered so. There's a decent amount of wood grain for a tone wood of this price.

Basswood: The commonness of Basswood on guitars is increasing. While agathis is only seen on budget basses, there exist expensive instruments with solid Basswood bodies. Different basswoods vary greatly, but I'll just talk about the type of Basswood seen on cheaper instruments. Basswood is an extremely neutral sounding wood. There's almost no tonal character at all, but that yields a consistent tone. The bass isn't lacking any lows, highs, or mids, but the mids are not complex and the frequency extremities are just enough to be noticed. It sounds very similar to agathis, but Basswoods light weight prevents it from having the potential for low-end girth that agathis provides. Basswood does not have any grain worth mentioning, and many Basswood basses have other wood veneers to give transparent finishes some visual character.

Mahogany: Like Basswood, there are different grades of mahogany. Most mahogany in a budget line is seen on Epiphone basses. It's a naturally dense wood, which is what most people consider 'warm'. Its strength lies in its low-mid and bass frequencies, but unfortunately, cheap Mahogany probably has the least tonal character in the mids and trebles out of all the woods in this section. However, if warmth is an important thing for you, this wood is hard to beat at this price range. It's heavy (sometimes it isn't, but sometimes it can be extremely heavy), and there's a nice subtle grain that looks nice with transparent finishes.

Alder: Alder is a wood commonly seen on expensive basses. It's Fender's facto-de-standard wood since the late 50's, and it's rare to see low-grade Alder. However, companies (e.g. Squier) make bodies thinner (i.e. using less wood) to keep costs down. If you see a bass with a thick Alder body for a low price, the company probably saved money by using cheaper electronics and hardware.

Bass Tone Wood


There are many different woods that basses are made of, and some have very different tonal qualities.

Alder: The quintessential Fender bass wood. It's a medium weight wood that has a nice, if subtle wood grain and a somewhat light colour. Tonally, it's quite warm, but has a good deal of clarity to it. Its tonal character lies consistently throughout the bass, but alder possesses an amount of low-end that seems high for a bass with such mid and high end presence.

Ash: A very popular tone wood. It's more expensive than alder, but also found on many Fenders, and its tonal characteristics would make many say it is superior to alder. Ash is a strikingly clear tone wood. You can get a fantastic amount of crystal-clear treble from this bass, as well as deep sub-lows. Ash is not as warm as alder, and this is what separates the two woods. Ash is a lighter, brighter wood with a more pronounced wood grain. One might consider ash to be more 'hi-fi' than alder, which is ironic, because the first Fender basses were made of ash. However, with active electronics, ash is a crucial ingredient in getting a hi-fi tone.

Maple:
Maple-bodied basses are typically the brightest and clearest basses. You get total tonal clarity and an intense amount of high-end detail, almost to a harsh degree. It's a heavy wood, so deep lows are ever present, but they can be dialled out completely. Warmth is simply not in a maple-bodied bass.

Mahogany: Mahogany can be safely considered the tonal opposite of maple. Like said earlier in the budget bass section, mahogany is an extremely warm wood that has a great low-mid presence. However, more expensive mahogany has some mid and treble detail that cheaper grade tends to not have.

Bubinga:
You could possibly consider bubinga to be mahogany on steroids. Bubinga is a very heavy wood with a bludgeoning low-mid and bass presence. It's a very dense wood, so there is some treble sparkle tucked away, but for the most part, it's a bassy wood.

Basswood: Basswood is naturally a tonally neutral wood, regardless of the grade. However, with higher grades, the bland tone manifests itself as a tonally even and totally consistent tone. There's no added bass or treble from the constitution of the wood - most of the tonal control comes from onboard preamps. This wood is the most chameleonic out of all of the tone woods.


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#9
dude you have made my day by posting an extract from the bass forum faq
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