#4
Quote by akaDan
Nursery

Primary

Secondary (sometimes college courses as well)

College or University


That's the order.


At least that's it in Scotia
#6
Primary (reception/kindergarten, Yr 1-6) [aged 5-11]

Secondary (Yr 7-11) [aged 11-16]

Sixth Form (Yr 12-13, also called Lower and Upper Sixth) or College [aged 16-18]

College or University [aged 18+]


GCSEs are exams taken by Year 11, and A-Levels by Year 13s. Year 12s do AS-Levels, which count for half of their A-Levels.

At GCSE, the grades are, from worst to best: G F E D C B A A* ("A-star").

At A-Level, the grades are E D C B A.

Uniform is compulsory in most schools up to Sixth Form, and in some Sixth Forms too. It's compulsory to attend school up to Year 11.

At Secondary School level, there are Comprehensive, Grammar and Private/Public Schools. Comprehensives allow anyone in (sometimes within a catchment area); Grammar and sometimes Private schools have entry exams. Comprehensive and Grammar schools are State-funded; Private schools are paid for by fees paid by the parents of the pupils.


Universities give degrees (BA, MA, PhD.) Some universities are collegiate, in that they are composed of several colleges that together give you a degree (eg. Oxford University contains Jesus College and Corpus Christi College among others.)

There are colleges of higher education, that give degrees; and colleges of further education give vocational courses.


Seeing as this is a music site, I'll include the music eduation system too:

You can get Grades in your instrument, by practicing sets of exercises and study pieces, and taking a practical and theory exam. The Grades go from 1 (basic) to 8 (advanced).

To get into most music colleges (eg the Royal Academy of Music), you need to either have a Grade 8 in your instrument, or be Grade 8 Standard, which means that you are the same standard of skill on your instrument as someone with Grade 8 is. This would be judged by the college.

You can Music for GCSE and A-Level, though most music colleges don't require that you have either. Many applicants will have them, but they aren't essential. You may require an English GCSE, though, so that they know that you can do the coursework.
Last edited by blue_strat at Feb 21, 2008,
#7
Nursey > Infants > Junior/Primary School > Senior/High School > College > Univeristy
Break those sections into blocks of years

Nursey 3-4

Reception 4-5
Year 1 5-6
Year 2 6-7

Year 3 7-8
Year 4 8-9
Year 5 9-10
Year 6 10-11

Year 7 11-12
Year 8 12-13
Year 9 13-14
Year 10 14-15
Year 11 15-16

Year 12/Lower Sixth 16-17
Year 13/Upper Sixth 17-18

Undergraduate @ Univeristy
Postgraduate @ University
PhD @ University
Quote by Ruckus.
Another time I was watching lesbian porn and masterbating, when my mom walks in. Like, right as I climax. She's just standing there with her mouth wide open and I'm like "I was curious...go gay rights!" Fu.cking awkward...
#8
everything there is to know about the british school system, I'll have to write a letter to a friend were i need to write about the upper secondery school, and i have to use this words in it: curriculm, subjects, teachers, classmates, rules, social activities
#9
Most schools go in this order:

Nursery = Toddlers
Infants School = Reception, Year 1, Year 2.
Junior School = Year 3, Year 4, Year 5, Year 6.
High School = Year 7, Year 8, Year 9, Year 10, Year 11.

College = Any age.
University = Any age.

Sometimes though, odd schools here and there combine infants and junior school.
#10
Quote by :Revenga:
At least that's it in Scotia

I'm from England and it's the same. The ages are as follows I think.

Nursery - upto 4.

Primary 5 - 11

Secondary 12 - 16

College 16 - N/A

University - 18 - N/A

Sometimes though, odd schools here and there combine infants and junior school.

Really? Mine did that so I assumed all did.
#11
It's a bit different for Scotland

But these are for Scotland:


Ages 4-5 = Nursery
Ages 5-11 = Primary School
Ages 11 - 17 = Secondary School
Ages 17 -> = College/University (In England you have to pay tuition fees, in Scotland they have been abolished)

7 years in primary school

6 years in scondary school (although can leave at 5th year)

Sit Standard Grades in 4th year of Secondary school (usually 7 exams are sat)

Sit Highers in 5th year of secondary school (usually 5 exams are sat)

Optional A-Levels in 6th Year

Uniform in most schools


GAS
Throbak Stonebender | Fulltone Deja Vibe | Catalinbread Semaphore
Last edited by Stuarttt-1 at Feb 21, 2008,
#12
OOhh upper secondary school is Years 10 and 11 (ages 14-16) where you take your GCSEs and thats your qualification for leaving school and the end of compulsary education. Standard Uniforms are used in virtually every secondary school in the country.

Curriculum involves: English, Maths, Science, A Modern Foreign langauge, A Humanity (hist, geog, re, politics) then you usually have 3 or 4 "options" from a wide wide range of subjects i did Drama, History and Business .... also available georgraphy, art, phys ed, religious education .... the list goes on and on
Quote by Ruckus.
Another time I was watching lesbian porn and masterbating, when my mom walks in. Like, right as I climax. She's just standing there with her mouth wide open and I'm like "I was curious...go gay rights!" Fu.cking awkward...
#13
Quote by PUNKfromNORWAY
everything there is to know about the british school system, I'll have to write a letter to a friend were i need to write about the upper secondery school, and i have to use this words in it: curriculm, subjects, teachers, classmates, rules, social activities

Ok...

You have to wear uniforms, at least most of them do.

Most of that list will differ from school to school I think. E.G, the teacher's at my school were absolute pricks (the majority, I hold great respect for my old history teacher, he was a smart and kind man), they'd go ape sh*t at you for the smallest things like undoing the top button on your shirt because its too hot.

As for subjects, the above guy covered it pretty well. Some schools and colleges allow students to visit a college perhaps once a week to study a subject from a different curriculum e.g. psychology.
#16
You get paid £30 a week to attend college.
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You'll Never Walk Alone
#17
Quote by PUNKfromNORWAY
everything there is to know about the british school system, I'll have to write a letter to a friend were i need to write about the upper secondery school, and i have to use this words in it: curriculm, subjects, teachers, classmates, rules, social activities

by british do you mean english?

because it's completely different in scotland, and I think N.Ireland have their own way too.
#19
Classrooms typically hold 25-30 students, sometimes more, sometimes less. Rather than the teachers move classes to their lessons (like Germany), students will move to a different classroom for each lesson.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#20
Quote by kidsilcon
You get paid £30 a week to attend college.

IF your parents earn under a certain amount of money. You then get paid £30 "EMA" a week to help with college stuff.
#22
Quote by akaDan
IF your parents earn under a certain amount of money. You then get paid £30 "EMA" a week to help with college stuff.

Under £30,000 a year I think.
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You'll Never Walk Alone
#23
Quote by blue_strat
"Sat" ...


The irony...anyway thanks


GAS
Throbak Stonebender | Fulltone Deja Vibe | Catalinbread Semaphore