#1
So I'm finally home alone and I'm going to give my 6505 a go at some killer volume. Hope my neighbours won't kill me.

Anyways, I'm having a little problem with the mic "clipping" (if that's the right word). I can't seem to get the input level down. Whenever I turn the volume up to band practise level, the mic signal is completely blown out. Adjusting the input volume in audacity or in the windows controls won't help.

What do I need to do?
#2
Well, it doesn't sound like you have a pre-amp, but if you do ,turn it down. Alternatively, turn your amp down , or move the mic further from the amp.
There is poetry in despair.
#3
Will a preamp solve the problem? Can I use my microcube as a preamp, considering the fact that it has that "mic" thing?
#4
the micro cube isnt the best option but it will work....
Turn your amp down or use an attenuator

Any mic will break up at extreme volume like this...

an attenuator will let you get that cranked tone but at lower volume which is much easier to record.
#5
just turn it down is probably the easiest way..

it might not get you the results that you want but it certainly beats clipping
hug your local pug dealer!
#6
How's the mic connected? It seems like a USB one on my end. If you can get an attenuator, I'd recommend it, though the rest of your band members should follow suit in quieting down or you'll be lost in the mix.

You may want to consider getting a good DI box, or one specifically meant for amp heads like the JDX Radial (if you have money to spare) or the Behringer GI-100.
#7
What mic and how do you have it hooked up?

Sure, any mic will clip at extreme volumes, but we're generally not talking guitar amps. We're talking jet engines. A 57 shouldn't break up on a guitar amp. That's one of the reasons why they're one of the number one choices to drop an inch off the top of a snare drum when Mr. Animal sets up to beat the bejeezus out of his kit. A condensor, on the other hand..... I wouldn't do that.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
turn the level on the interface down.
Fender H Stratocaster USA.
SX P90 Mahogany Hawk
Gibson Les Paul Studio Double Cut

Delta Labs Tube Driver
Hardwire SC-2 Valve Distortion
Delta Labs Stereo Chorus
TC Nova Repeater
Korg Pitchblack Tuner Ped

Fender Super Champ XD
#9
I have an AT9400 condenser going straight into the line-in on my sound card. The mic is just something that my father bought like 10 years ago. So I should get a new mic?

guitargod5: What interface?
#10
Quote by Dores
I have an AT9400 condenser going straight into the line-in on my sound card. The mic is just something that my father bought like 10 years ago. So I should get a new mic?

guitargod5: What interface?



oh i thought you were using a interface

um what program are you using?
and windows or mac?

you may want to turn the input level on the computer down.
Fender H Stratocaster USA.
SX P90 Mahogany Hawk
Gibson Les Paul Studio Double Cut

Delta Labs Tube Driver
Hardwire SC-2 Valve Distortion
Delta Labs Stereo Chorus
TC Nova Repeater
Korg Pitchblack Tuner Ped

Fender Super Champ XD
#11
A condenser WILL clip at high volumes, it is NOT designed for things that loud. Either turn your amp down, or live with the clipping. Or get an Sm57 and solve both problems.
#12
guitargod: I'm using audacity on my PC. Turning down the input volume there only makes the clipped signal lower.
#13
Wait a sec.... you have a condensor going to a line in on your sound card? No preamp, no phantom power? And it works?!

What soundcard?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
I'm surprised too...it's an old mic, so I doubt it's a battery powered one.

How about moving the microphone away from the amp itself? Condensors may not be the best for miking amp cabs since they're more sensitive (though I've heard good things about the Rode NT2000), but if you have it, you might as well try dealing with it.
#15
You should be a minimum of 8" away from a cranked cab if you don't want to damage the mic.
#16
switch to the SM57 and get yourself an interface...
you may have broken the mic at this point, I didnt know you were using a condenser and I am also shocked you have it working without any phantom power..........
#17
Quote by MrPillow
A condenser WILL clip at high volumes, it is NOT designed for things that loud. Either turn your amp down, or live with the clipping. Or get an Sm57 and solve both problems.


+1, get a dynamic mic, they are designed to cope with high volume.
#18
My mic is battery powered. And it works fine at "low" volumes, so I doubt I've damaged it.

Guess I have to start saving up for 57 then. Thanks guys!