#1
well im new to this composing thing and just getting my head around learning the diff key sigs, so im finding it really hard to compose this piece, i really have no idea, its for school. so can anybody help me out please?
im not asking for u to do my work for me but like, i have lead, rhythm and bass section. and i have no idea on what notes to use or what the IV and V are...

my sheet says the bass line is based on scale degrees 1,3,5 and 6.
and i know that the blues scale is : 1 3b 4 4# 5 7b 1

and that i can use the notes in C maj, G maj and D maj for the lead. can i just put any notes in and it'll hopefully sound good? (most of teh time) or are there a few things i can look out for??
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"Never interrupt an enemy when he is making a mistake."
~Napoleon Bonaparte
#2
The blues is a tricky genre, theoretically speaking. If you like, you could stick to the minor pentatonic notes for G, those being G, A#, C, D, F since only the 3rd (A#) would ever clash with a chord tone, which would be kinda okay so it's the blues and doing weird things with the 3rd is completely fine.

Alternatively, you could use the I, IV, V arpeggios as you suggested. The notes would be G, A, B, C, D, E, F#. Or just a G major scale, but if you were selective about your notes, then you could use them as arpeggios. G, A and B are the I arpeggio, C, D and E are the IV arpeggio and D, E and F# are the V arpeggio.
One neat thing you can do with arpeggios is add notes to flavour the underlying chord more, so if you want to create space you could play a certain note and have the audience believe that a certain chord is being played rather than a simpler chord with a lead part over it.
e.g. the rhythm guitarist plays a G major chord, consisting of the notes G, A and B. You could play an F note at the same time he played the chord and it would take the flavour of a Gmaj7 chord.
You can, of course, do this with many different intervals, but using the 7 would be the most common way to do it.

Personally, I'd use the G mixolydian scale and wouldn't complicate it beyond that. The mixolydian is a brilliant major scale for rock and blues. It goes like so:

1 2 3 4 5 6 b7

So, just a major scale with a flattened 7th. In the key of G major, it is G, A, B, C, D, E, F.

Watch out if you do this, however, since the F would clash with the F# in the D chord, so when you know the D chord is coming up, just play the regular G major (or G lydian if you like!)

EDIT:

The I, IV, and V refer to the 1, 4 and 5 notes/chord in a progression. So they would be the notes or chords G, C and D in this case.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
Last edited by MadassAlex at Feb 22, 2008,
#3
Quote by MadassAlex
The blues is a tricky genre, theoretically speaking. If you like, you could stick to the minor pentatonic notes for G, those being G, A#, C, D, F since only the 3rd (A#) would ever clash with a chord tone, which would be kinda okay so it's the blues and doing weird things with the 3rd is completely fine.

Alternatively, you could use the I, IV, V arpeggios as you suggested. The notes would be G, A, B, C, D, E, F#. Or just a G major scale, but if you were selective about your notes, then you could use them as arpeggios. G, A and B are the I arpeggio, C, D and E are the IV arpeggio and D, E and F# are the V arpeggio.
One neat thing you can do with arpeggios is add notes to flavour the underlying chord more, so if you want to create space you could play a certain note and have the audience believe that a certain chord is being played rather than a simpler chord with a lead part over it.
e.g. the rhythm guitarist plays a G major chord, consisting of the notes G, A and B. You could play an F note at the same time he played the chord and it would take the flavour of a Gmaj7 chord.
You can, of course, do this with many different intervals, but using the 7 would be the most common way to do it.

Personally, I'd use the G mixolydian scale and wouldn't complicate it beyond that. The mixolydian is a brilliant major scale for rock and blues. It goes like so:

1 2 3 4 5 6 b7

So, just a major scale with a flattened 7th. In the key of G major, it is G, A, B, C, D, E, F.

Watch out if you do this, however, since the F would clash with the F# in the D chord, so when you know the D chord is coming up, just play the regular G major (or G lydian if you like!)

EDIT:

The I, IV, and V refer to the 1, 4 and 5 notes/chord in a progression. So they would be the notes or chords G, C and D in this case.


Great! thanks, ill just read this over about 10 more times then ill understand the first paragraph but really thanks alot. oh and the rhythm i think is going to be piano. would that really make a difference if it were piano or guitar?
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"Never interrupt an enemy when he is making a mistake."
~Napoleon Bonaparte
#4
Nah, chords and scales sound exactly the same on all western instruments except for tone.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#5
okay thanks again.
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"Never interrupt an enemy when he is making a mistake."
~Napoleon Bonaparte
#6
Alex is right, blues is a tough genre to explain because the backing chords are dominant 7th chords (1 3 5 b7) and almost anything goes when you have that kind of chord. A standard approach to a blues in G would be to play the G minor pentatonic. Yes, I know that your blues is a major blues, but the minor pentatonic is often used over major chords in a blues context, for ne other reason than it sounding bluesy. I suggest mixing that G minor pentatonic with the b5 note (Db in this case) and some chord tones (notes derived from the backing chords).
#7
Quote by MadassAlex
The blues is a tricky genre, theoretically speaking. If you like, you could stick to the minor pentatonic notes for G, those being G, A#, C, D, F since only the 3rd (A#) would ever clash with a chord tone, which would be kinda okay so it's the blues and doing weird things with the 3rd is completely fine.

Alternatively, you could use the I, IV, V arpeggios as you suggested. The notes would be G, A, B, C, D, E, F#. Or just a G major scale, but if you were selective about your notes, then you could use them as arpeggios. G, A and B are the I arpeggio, C, D and E are the IV arpeggio and D, E and F# are the V arpeggio.
One neat thing you can do with arpeggios is add notes to flavour the underlying chord more, so if you want to create space you could play a certain note and have the audience believe that a certain chord is being played rather than a simpler chord with a lead part over it.
e.g. the rhythm guitarist plays a G major chord, consisting of the notes G, A and B. You could play an F note at the same time he played the chord and it would take the flavour of a Gmaj7 chord.
You can, of course, do this with many different intervals, but using the 7 would be the most common way to do it.

Personally, I'd use the G mixolydian scale and wouldn't complicate it beyond that. The mixolydian is a brilliant major scale for rock and blues. It goes like so:

1 2 3 4 5 6 b7

So, just a major scale with a flattened 7th. In the key of G major, it is G, A, B, C, D, E, F.

Watch out if you do this, however, since the F would clash with the F# in the D chord, so when you know the D chord is coming up, just play the regular G major (or G lydian if you like!)

EDIT:

The I, IV, and V refer to the 1, 4 and 5 notes/chord in a progression. So they would be the notes or chords G, C and D in this case.



I'm not certain what this guy means by apreggios, since what he said would be some ridiculous Gadd9(no5) chord or something. The notes of G major are G B D, not G A B. C is C E G and D is D F# A.

But the rest of what he said is pretty much right. So yeah, listen to that post.
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