#1
so ive been searching the lessons and forums on this site for about 2 days now trying to get some help with this but it seems like i cant find anything definative.

its been 1 1/2 years of me playing guitar to decide to get my act together and start learning some real theory as i have recently started jamming and trying to write somes with some mates. so i figure for a basic song i want to write some chord progressions and then develop riffs/lead parts over the top. now i know some basics about scales and modes but im finding it hard to figure out chords that go well together.

ive heard about chord scales but only in a passing referance from a friend, and i cant find anything on this site about them. are they real? could someone link to something about them lessons/articles/threads? or do you just find out by trying random chords together and seeing what sounds good?
#2
Basically, you have your scales which tell you which notes to play, and then you have your chord progression which tells you which notes from the scale to play and in what order.

Example: A 'I IV V' progression in C major = C Major (I) F Major (IV) G Major (V)


Why?

The C major scale is: C D E F G A B (C)

So you take the 1st, 4th and 5th notes from the scale. (C F G)

You could mess around with chord sounds and find out what works though.


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#4
o.k thanks for the help but i still have a few questions, i dont get how you knew in a I, IV, V all the chords will "fit" together well

also how did you know they were all major chords and not minor?

and i think i may be talking about cords that fit into a single diatonic key but i dont really know


and to bangoodcharlotte that lesson is really helpfull ive been using it to learn theory so far but i dont see where it says anything about this... it just goes on about modes to put on top of chord progressions it already gives you, i want to know how to produce the chord progressions themselves,

if im missing it please point it out to me
Last edited by schnips63 at Feb 22, 2008,
#5
1.) They just fit together, it's how the scale and progression work, you could choose another progression and find out what it would be.
2.) The C major scale consists of major chords, different scales will give different chords.


ESP LTD MH-350NT
Hughes & Kettner Switchblade 100
Orange PPC412AD
Seagull S6 Cedar Slim
Manuel Rodríguez C1M


Guitarist of Ravenage
Drummer of Windrider
Solo Project is Aloeswood
#6
Quote by Guitar_Dan_666
1.) They just fit together, it's how the scale and progression work, you could choose another progression and find out what it would be.
2.) The C major scale consists of major chords, different scales will give different chords.


o.k so just to be clear
1) does this mean any chord should sound good with any other chord

2)so the thing i dont get is a phrygian scale in c would be

C, Db, Eb, F, G, Ab, Bb,C.............i think

so that mean all those chords would sound good together but how do you know which ones are majors and which are minors?


sorry for being annoying and thick but i need this to "click" before i move on with my learning
#7
While phrygian is a scale, it's easier to think of it as a mode of the major scale. More precisely, it's the 3rd mode of it. As the third note in the C major scale is E, E phrygian is a mode of C major. This means it contains the exact same notes, but starting from a different position, which gives it a totally different sound. So E phrygian would sound okay over chords from the C major scale.

The C major scale is a series of notes: C, D, E, F, G, A, B

but also a series of chords that fit well together (which means they all only use notes from the C major scale): C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim.

This pattern of major and minor is just standard across the major scale, no matter where you start, so you need to learn it.

Now, you're talking about C phrygian. C is the 3rd of the Ab major scale (just go backwards 4 semitones to find the major scale from the 3rd). So Ab major is:

Ab Bbm Cm Db Eb Fm Gdim

So C phrygian would sound okay over those chords.

Hope that clears some stuff up. If not, feel free to ask.
#8
aaaahhh i think i get it now

so all i need to commit to memory is
maj, min, min, maj, maj, min, dim

and then i can apply this to any major scale to make chord progressions


one last question
whats the maj,min patern for the minor scales?

thank you everyone for your help
Last edited by schnips63 at Feb 22, 2008,
#9
Quote by schnips63
aaaahhh i think i get it now

so all i need to commit to memory is
maj, min, min, maj, maj, min, dim

and then i can apply this to any major scale to make chord progressions


one last question
whats the maj,min patern for the minor scales?

thank you everyone for your help


Minor pattern is just a major pattern starting on a 6th degree:

min, dim, maj, min, min, maj, maj...
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