#1
so ive never played chords before came across one that was e\b does that mean play the e chord and slide to the b chord or is it just a way of noting one chord?
#2
I'm new to guitar playing, 2 days old tbh, but yes I'm pretty sure it means "slide from 'e' to 'b'".

And I think the proper notation is with a "/" not "\".
Last edited by tony.laskir at Feb 22, 2008,
#4
Ok, first off, an E major chord contains the notes E, G# and B but for it to be an authentic E major chord, E must be the lowest note played. An E/B is an E major chord but B is the lowest note played. 779997 is the first possible voicing of an E/B that comes to mind.
#5
It's called a "slash chord". Another way of saying it is it's "an E chord with a B in the bass".
As tom above stated, the root note for the E maj. chord is E, but with a slash chord, the lowest sounding note will be a B. Only problem is that the closest B note on the 6th string happens to be up at the 7th fret. Not likely you'll be able to play a standard E and get that B note to sound also, unless you have freakishly long fingers, so he suggested the bar chord version of it, 779997.
#6
Quote by tom183
Ok, first off, an E major chord contains the notes E, G# and B but for it to be an authentic E major chord, E must be the lowest note played. An E/B is an E major chord but B is the lowest note played. 779997 is the first possible voicing of an E/B that comes to mind.


Actually, it'd be called a perfect E major chord, because the tonic would be in the bass and the soprano(you're two e strings, respectivly) when it is 022100

E/B would be an Emaj 2nd inversion chord, making it B, E, and G# as the triad, so yes, 779997 would be the best choice