#1
Im buying a guitar in a couple days. Ive never played before and im 15 years old ( male ). I am going to be taking lessons that same day as i buy my guitar. So i was wondering is it easy to learn? or is it something some people are good at and some people are not so good at? Ive played a little acoustic at my friends house but it was just messing around. The acoustic seemed hard to hit notes right though. So i was wondering how long will it take to learn how to read notes and everything. Basically how long until i will start to learn songs? I will practice the guitar at least 2 hours a day. Just not sure how easy it is going to be. Thanx for all your help. Also i will be doing classic rock
#2
it all depends on you dude. When I started, my third lesson, i was playing jingle bell's, that same weekend, i went home and taught myself i remember you from skid row, solo and all. Put the time into, and you will learn quick. Don't expect it to come to you, too many people do.
#3
it all depends on you dude. i believe that natural talent exists, if you've been playin a week and your already throwin down hard riffs then you might have some talent. dont worry though cuz with enough practice and commitment you can earn some talent. its taken me two years before i felt like i can take my playing anywhere. something that helps is having a friend who is a lot better than you so you can have a rival
#5
Quote by CodyPayne
Im buying a guitar in a couple days. Ive never played before and im 15 years old ( male ). I am going to be taking lessons that same day as i buy my guitar. So i was wondering is it easy to learn? or is it something some people are good at and some people are not so good at? Ive played a little acoustic at my friends house but it was just messing around. The acoustic seemed hard to hit notes right though. So i was wondering how long will it take to learn how to read notes and everything. Basically how long until i will start to learn songs? I will practice the guitar at least 2 hours a day. Just not sure how easy it is going to be. Thanx for all your help. Also i will be doing classic rock

start playing on the acoustic, even if you know you eventually be getting an electric. thats what i did and i can tap, very well. whatever you do, don't get discouraged
(which was what i did for about a year, and it was because i was teaching myself everything)
#6
what are the basics to you really? because to play a song it wont take long but to understand why that song sounds good and what scales they use and what not may take a long time ive been playing for a year and a half and i can hold my own and what not but i cant read music at all
#7
I will be practicing alot. Also im getting an electric first - no way am i doing acoustic )TOO HARD( also *polio23* did u take lessons? Do you guys think lessons will help alot?
#9
There's no real rules to follow, and no real way to say where you'll be as far as playing the guitar because everyone is different. We all learn at different rates. It will depend on your seriousness in learning, dedication, and practices.

I've been learning pretty much all on my own, through things I pick up online, books, videos, and a few things from friends that I know play. One bit of advice everyone's consistantly told me is to make it enjoyable. Have fun first. Don't make it a chore. They told me that if I were to seek out a teacher, find someone that's willing to teach me how to play the songs I want to play. Theory, I feel, is important, but it's easy to get bogged down and get bored. Make it a part of your learning, but don't try to concentrate on just theory from the onset. I know a few people that teach that don't overwhelm their students with theory simply because they know the student will eventually get bored, and just quit playing altogether.

Don't worry about time frames or how long it'll take to learn this or that.

Have fun!
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#10
Quote by asystemdown
holy crap, i totally said exactly what jamogod said



great minds think alike??
#11
Quote by djmay71
start playing on the acoustic, even if you know you eventually be getting an electric. thats what i did and i can tap, very well. whatever you do, don't get discouraged
(which was what i did for about a year, and it was because i was teaching myself everything)

Why would you spend money on an acoustic to practice for an electric.... thats the stupidest thing I've heard in a while tbh. First off, the fret access on acoustics tend to be hideous, and they have massive bodies. Secondly, huge waste of money. Thirdly, wow, you can tap?, teach muh plz. Its like asking someone to practice for Hockey on Moon Shoes rather than skates.
Epiphone G-400
GFS Crunchy PAF - Bridge

DigiTech Bad Monkey
iSP Decimator

New Amp Fund: Depleted
#12
I've been playing since I was 12. I am now 65, so I feel pretty confident on the guitar. A few years back I bought a guitar for my 12 year old cousin--it was a cheap guitar, nylon string that looked like an acoustic. She played it for a week and then confinced her parents to get guitar lessons. Her parents would only let her have classical guitar lessons, so they bought her a classical guitar. I was away and hadn't seen her for over 2 years. After 2 years, I finally came over to her house and brought my Gibson Les Paul and an acoustic so we could jam and I could finally teach her some leads/riffs--very simple stuff mind you. Well, she first picked up her classical guitar and played a Segovia (considered to have been the worlds greatest classical guitarist) riff, then picked up her new electric and played a Jimi Hendricks lick and then sang some Tori Amos stuff with her classical. I put back my Les Paul in its case, as well as my acoustic, and made an excuse that I had forgot something at work--and left the house feeling that for 40 years I had wasted valuable time in trying to learn on my own.
Well, that's not for everybody, if one is gifted/genious that wouldn't be a situation.
I have no advice other than the message from the above story.
#13
music takes time no two ways about it but it is always worth it IMO
The nice part about being a pessimist is that you are constantly being either proven right or pleasantly surprised
-George Will

Also caught her playing fallout boy on my guitar, changed my strings and cleaned it the next day.
#14
Quote by mike.h
Why would you spend money on an acoustic to practice for an electric.... thats the stupidest thing I've heard in a while tbh. Its like asking someone to practice for Hockey on Moon Shoes rather than skates.


Actually, an acoustic would help build finger strength faster than an electric. You tend to have to be more accurate with your fretting because you can't hide mistakes with special effects pedals like distortion. Many people that learn acoustic usually learn to finger pick first, which is still a great skill to have, transitioning to an electric guitar.

It's not a requirement to learning an electric, but it certainly doesn't hurt.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#16
I wasn't trying to confuse you. If you want an electric, go for an electric, especially considering the music styles that you want to play.

I was mainly disagreeing with the idea that having an acoustic would be useless.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#17
Ok one question-do u think i shouldnt do lessons? do you think i might get worn out on them? Are there alot of good books that i can buy to teach myself? I also need to learn how to read notes
#18
I was making the same decision as you back in June. I ultimately wanted to play electric, but I started with acoustic. It builds finger strength and really you learn to fret with more accuracy. Do what I did and buy a nice, cheap Yamaha acoustic, then when you're ready, switch over to electric.

My 2 cents...

P.S. take lessons, especially if your parents are paying for them. lol.
Last edited by ttreat31 at Feb 23, 2008,
#19
There are lots of books out there, and lessons definitely don't hurt. But I can't answer how you'll do with either a teacher or learning on your own. A lot of the questions you ask have answers that you have to figure out for yourself.

Just remember to have fun.

And if you don't think you like the way one thing is going, you can always try another way.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#20
take the lessons, it wil only guide you in the right direction, after a while, you will know if they are right for you or not, but if you don't take them, you will never know what they can do for you. Anyone telling you they took lessons and are amazing, is only speaking for themself, like i said early, it all depends on you dude
#21
Quote by Hakael
Actually, an acoustic would help build finger strength faster than an electric. You tend to have to be more accurate with your fretting because you can't hide mistakes with special effects pedals like distortion. Many people that learn acoustic usually learn to finger pick first, which is still a great skill to have, transitioning to an electric guitar.

It's not a requirement to learning an electric, but it certainly doesn't hurt.


+1

and the slow action and higher strings forces greater dexterity in both hands
#22
Quote by CodyPayne
Im getting confused now - so should i go acoustic or electric?


Doesn't matter, really. If you can play acoustic then you automatically can play electric and also the other way around. There are just some technique differences but they aren't hard to learn once you get the hold of playing the guitar.
First step is always to get yourself familiar with the guitar and train your finger strength. Now, your fingers as a beginner is not strong enough and don't know the fretboard well. Don't get frustrated if you can't pull anything off properly at first.
#24
Start slow and simple...I tried to play some tougher stuff my first day...got depressed when I had no clue what I was doing and quit for a month...

Start on acoustic, it helped me, forced me to learn chords because you can't just play single note riffs, they don't sound good.

And take lessons. I never have and I've regretted it. I can't read sheet music, and at this point, my techniques are so strange, I probably couldn't take lessons because the first year or so would just be fixing all the stuff I learned wrong.
#25
Quote by CodyPayne
Im getting confused now - so should i go acoustic or electric?


That's kind of a tough question. I started with electric then went to an acoustic. Acoustic is harder to play, but makes you better on the electric in the end. Get the one that suits your music style first, you'll enjoy it more if you start to play the stuff you really want to hear. Don't get discouraged and practice, practice, practice. I still suck, but i don't suck as bad as i did last week.
Dean Icon PZ
Line 6 Variax 700
Dean V-Wing
Dean ML 79 SilverBurst
MXR M 108
H2O Chorus/Echo
Valve Junior (V3 Head/Cab and Combo)
VHT Special 6
Phonic 620 Power Pod PA
Wampler Super Plextortion
Line 6 Pod HD
#26
Honestly, some basics are far too confusing to start with.. like all the chords and such
my dad tried showing me that kinda' stuff because he's been playing guitar for like 35 years.. so yeah he's amazing and knows like everything..
as weird as that is, I'm self-taught.. I think I asked him what natural harmonics were forever ago and that's about it..
He tried showing me the whole "ws ws hs ws ws ws hs" thing and I was like O.O (what..)
I honsetly, think it's easiest to learn a little bit of guitar on your own rather then jumping right into theory or you'll be lost..

and you're asking time to learn stuff?
Well that depends on how much you are going toward..

I have a friend who thought guitar would give him something to do and he'd play it all the time.. he hardly ever plays it.. not serious at all.

Neither was I, I mainly used it as a hobbie.. I've only been playing 6 months or so but.. not as much now.. but for a while I played constantly all day everyday.
You're asking about how long it is to learn songs, I learned much stuff within a month.. as sad as it is, I'm better then most of these kids who have been playing for 3 and 2 years and such..
so it just depends on how much you're going to put into it.

---
oh and you're question about acoustic or electric..?
I don't know.. acoustic would be best to start on.. but electric might be alot funner for you.
I have a friend who wants to play guitar and has an acoustic.. I say "if you really want to play guitar you could on that acoustic" but they won't.. they think an electric will change it.
So I'd probably say go with an electric.. but that's just me.. although acoustic is still amazing if you're good at it.. the sound is beautiful.
but that's not what the point is.
Last edited by TechnicolorType at Feb 23, 2008,
#27
Quote by TechnicolorType
Honestly, some basics are far too confusing to start with.. like all the chords and such
my dad tried showing me that kinda' stuff because he's been playing guitar for like 35 years.. so yeah he's amazing and knows like everything..
as weird as that is, I'm self-taught.. I think I asked him what natural harmonics were forever ago and that's about it..
He tried showing me the whole "ws ws hs ws ws ws hs" thing and I was like O.O (what..)
I honsetly, think it's easiest to learn a little bit of guitar on your own rather then jumping right into theory or you'll be lost..

and you're asking time to learn stuff?
Well that depends on how much you are going toward..

I have a friend who thought guitar would give him something to do and he'd play it all the time.. he hardly ever plays it.. not serious at all.

Neither was I, I mainly used it as a hobbie.. I've only been playing 6 months or so but.. not as much now.. but for a while I played constantly all day everyday.
You're asking about how long it is to learn songs, I learned much stuff within a month.. as sad as it is, I'm better then most of these kids who have been playing for 3 and 2 years and such..
so it just depends on how much you're going to put into it.

---
oh and you're question about acoustic or electric..?
I don't know.. acoustic would be best to start on.. but electric might be alot funner for you.
I have a friend who wants to play guitar and has an acoustic.. I say "if you really want to play guitar you could on that acoustic" but they won't.. they think an electric will change it.
So I'd probably say go with an electric.. but that's just me.. although acoustic is still amazing if you're good at it.. the sound is beautiful.
but that's not what the point is.


Thanx this really helped. How did you learn to read notes?
#28
Quote by CodyPayne
Thanx this really helped. How did you learn to read notes?


You don't really need to, but it helps. Just learn to read tablature and how to read note speed from sheet music. That way, when you see the tab for a chord and see that it's 16th notes or whatever, you know how to play it.
#29
I suggest starting acoustic. You'll be angry at first, but trust me, it's better to learn on that first. It forces you to learn chords, and frankly it made me a better musician in the long run. I had been playing guitar for 2 years before i ever even got an electric, but than again i didn't get serious until about 8 months before getting the electric.

As for the lessons, it really depends on your teacher. Mine was trying to teach me things i didn't want to learn, reading from a book, not teaching me tabs or even chords, just straight up reading notes. I taught myself more than i learned from him.
#30
i started out on acoustic, it builds finger strength, and like the other guy said before me you can't hide your mistakes
i've found that once you get decent on the acoustic then you'll be able to play a lot easier on an electric but whatever you want to get first is up to you

about the learning and reading notes thing, i've been reading music since i was around 8 or 9 so it's been pretty natural for me but umm there's books out there that are guitar-specific and work on that so get one of those

hope i was a help
Gear:
Fender Mexican Standard Strat(Sunburst, Rosewood, Custom Shop '69 pickups)
Fender Super Champ XD
EHX Big Muff Pi
Yamaha Acoustic
Alvarez Silver Anniversary Acoustic
#31
START ON ACOUSTIC!
I started on a 5 year old Squier, that's intonation and action was absolutely terrible. Highest action ever.

Best mistake of my life.
Main gear (For complete list, see profile):
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain-top
Basswood Telecaster, 2 single-sized HB's, both split.
Epiphone Valve Junior
B-52 AT-412 Cabinet
Oh, and I have a Squier VM Jazz Bass too.