#1
So my band and I want to record a demo. We have everything figured out minus how to minimize the echo in the room. The room we'll be recording in is fairly small. Computer in one corner, one door, and a closet. I wouldn't mind spending a few dollars to buy some materials to stick under the door or put on the walls, but is there any way to minimize the echo in the room to get some decent sounding recordings with things around the house? Household things we can hang from the walls? The recordings don't have to be amazing quality, really, if someone will be able to listen to it for 5 seconds without turning it off we're fine.

2004 MIM Strat w/ Fender Hot Noiseless pickups
Sovtek MiG 60
Avatar 2x12 w/ Celestion Greenbacks
Snark Tuner
MXR Custom Comp
Fulltone Full-Drive 2
Dunlop JHM3 Univibe
TC electronic Nova Delay
TC electronic Arena Reverb
#2
acoustic treatment can be expensive...
try making some panels with stiff sound insulation and cover it in a light material.
Install a few of these on some of the walls.

You should be able to pick up materials at most home theater sites or stores.
#3
Quote by MrDinkleberry
Household things we can hang from the walls?


As long as you can get them a little ways from the walls you can use duvets as a low-cost alternative to acoustic panels. Make sure you take extra care with the corners and don't place any absorbent material symmetrically since that will cut down on the effectiveness.
#4
You can use a gate/limiter to reduce ambience, most apps come with some plugin of that description. Be careful of ADSR settings, because they can make cymbals clip.

You could also try gobos, which are portable screens that absorb and reflect ambient noise.
#5
Quote by ebon00
As long as you can get them a little ways from the walls you can use duvets as a low-cost alternative to acoustic panels. Make sure you take extra care with the corners and don't place any absorbent material symmetrically since that will cut down on the effectiveness.


What do you mean about placing material symmetrically?

Thanks to everyone else for the help too!

2004 MIM Strat w/ Fender Hot Noiseless pickups
Sovtek MiG 60
Avatar 2x12 w/ Celestion Greenbacks
Snark Tuner
MXR Custom Comp
Fulltone Full-Drive 2
Dunlop JHM3 Univibe
TC electronic Nova Delay
TC electronic Arena Reverb
#6
Symmetry means doing the same thing on one side as another. For instance, imagine your room as a rectangle if looking above it. If you put treatment on one corner, say the left side, you should do it to the other corner facing it, or the right.
Last edited by Fast_Fingers at Feb 23, 2008,
#7
Quote by MrDinkleberry
What do you mean about placing material symmetrically?


Don't match up the placement along the walls. This would be considered almost perfectly symmetrical.



The problem with this, even if the material is absorbent, is that it allows for very nice, right angles that will allow sound waves to bounce very freely around the room. However, if you arrange this asymmetrically the right-angle "paths" will be broken and you'll get a less reverberant space:



These aren't meant to be guidelines by any means, it's just to prove a point. The most important thing in most rooms when it comes to acoustic treatment are corner bass traps which I haven't indicated here. And if recording drums it's almost always a good idea to place some kind of acoustic treatment right above the kit to minimize reflections from the ceiling.
Last edited by ebon00 at Feb 24, 2008,