#1
Ok, since I am planning on getting a new guitar, I am thinking of tricking out my SG. I am thinking of making it look just like Jimmy Page's Les Paul. How do you think i should go about taking all of the paint off of it, and painting it black, and putting a gold binding on it. Since it is an Epi SG Special, and the neck is bolt on , could i just unbolt it to paint it? I would really like to make it Satin instead of gloss. Any help would be great, cause i dont want to ruin it too bad.
Hello
#2
Yeah unbolt it, and you can't go wrong with sanding...unless you are an idiot...things like this can be answered by going to projectguitar.com
Guitars:
Ibanez EW30ASERLG
Jackson Performer PS4 (soon to be sold)
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR
Orpheus Valley Fiesta FC
Gear:
POD X3 Live
Boss ME-20
Marshall MG15DFX
M-Audio Fastrack Ultra
Boss DR660
#3
you could just unbolt it i expect, sand it down then paint it satin black about 3-5 coats then if you want to make it look good 30 coats of varnish
#4
This might be a stupid question but whats varnish. What grit of sandpaper do you reccommend i use. What should i use for the gloss on the body?
Hello
#5
To refinish, strip the body down to wood.
Nothing else.
You might be thinking, if you're a beginner, "Oh, it'll be easier to leave everything in."
NO.
Strip down to wood. Sand off the old finish with coarse sandpaper. Find a black lacquer (automotive paint works well if you want to go cheaper and buy locally), and apply several coats. Make sure that the coat is even, and make sure there are no drips or runs. To get the finish to a gloss, apply clear coat. Think you've applied enough (about one can?) apply twice as much. I didn't use enough clear coat on my current guitar, and ended up with a subpar matte finish. After you have plent of clear coat, progressively wet sand (make sure the paper is an insanely high grit) and then buff until glossy.

That's a pretty rough paragraph, with some of the worst grammar I've ever used, but it should give you an idea.
Main gear (For complete list, see profile):
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain-top
Basswood Telecaster, 2 single-sized HB's, both split.
Epiphone Valve Junior
B-52 AT-412 Cabinet
Oh, and I have a Squier VM Jazz Bass too.
#7
As an update to my post, I realized-
To take off the "gloss," use a low grit sandpaper.
When finishing your guitar, after clear coating, simply wet sand until you have the desired amount of gloss/matte balance.
Main gear (For complete list, see profile):
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain-top
Basswood Telecaster, 2 single-sized HB's, both split.
Epiphone Valve Junior
B-52 AT-412 Cabinet
Oh, and I have a Squier VM Jazz Bass too.
#8
Quote by forsaknazrael
Good luck doing the binding. That's going to be fun. Maybe not even possible on an SG, due to the way the body is beveled.

Agreed. For a creative "gold" idea, think about crackle paint. You can paint the guitar gold and paint a black coat over it, and the black will crackle to reveal bits and pieces of the gold. I've seen it done with green and white on a strat before, and it looked really creative. The girl who did it also had long paintings of flowers running on it. It was really beautiful; had a strange, quaint, southern charm. Anyways, look into crackle paint; it can yield some very cool results.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#9
Quote by rafarquhar
To refinish, strip the body down to wood.
Nothing else.
You might be thinking, if you're a beginner, "Oh, it'll be easier to leave everything in."
NO.
Strip down to wood. Sand off the old finish with coarse sandpaper. Find a black lacquer (automotive paint works well if you want to go cheaper and buy locally), and apply several coats. Make sure that the coat is even, and make sure there are no drips or runs. To get the finish to a gloss, apply clear coat. Think you've applied enough (about one can?) apply twice as much. I didn't use enough clear coat on my current guitar, and ended up with a subpar matte finish. After you have plent of clear coat, progressively wet sand (make sure the paper is an insanely high grit) and then buff until glossy.

That's a pretty rough paragraph, with some of the worst grammar I've ever used, but it should give you an idea.

Wait, why would i want to sand the gloss if I want the body glossy? Were you talking about the neck? I should be using an air brush right? What should I apply alot of...the paint, or the gloss?
Hello
#10
Oh, shouldnt i put some kind of treatment on the wood once i get it down to only wood?
Ok, So Far i am going to
-Take all of the hardware out of the guitar.
-Strip off the pain by sanding it correctly (step by step guide on projectguitar.com)
-Treat the wood (I think)
-Airbrush the guitar black (plenty of coats, and keeping the routed areas covered along with the neck pocket)
-Attempt to make a gold binding around it
-Gloss finish (gloss the sh*t out of it then buff it)
-Do the same with the neck, except a satin finish

The only things i'm not sure about are the satin neck, and when to use an airbrush or not.
Hello
#12
I don't think the binding is possible, to be honest.
And it's not so much an airbrush as it is a spray.. thing.
Pretty much the same device used for automotive finishing.
Here's a rough guide.

-Strip guitar to bare body, remove neck.
-Sand off current finish.
-Use nitrocellulose lacquer (see reranch.com) or automotive lacquer to put on several even coats of black. Look at painting tutorials to make sure you get a good, even application.
-Use a VERY HIGH grit sandpaper to wet sand any dust, small runs, etc. BE VERY CAREFUL SO THAT YOU DON'T SAND THROUGH THE FINISH.
-Use clear nitrocellulose or automotive clear coat to clear coat the body. Apply a lot of this stuff, and literally, a lot. If you're going with automotive lacquer, be prepared to use two cans (at least).
-After finishing, you'll probably have a somewhat matte body. Use extremely high grit (almost exclusively used in automotive finishing) sandpaper to WET SAND the body smooth, moving to progressively higher grits. Yes, you're reading this right. You have to sand it. This is why you use A LOT of clear coat: the top of the clear coat will be bumpy with imperfections, so you use the sandpaper to take them off. Look up wet sanding tutorials, because I don't remember how high of a grit you need.
-After you have most of the bumps smoothed out, finish up with some buffing to get that final shine.

That's a pretty rough outline, but better.
Main gear (For complete list, see profile):
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain-top
Basswood Telecaster, 2 single-sized HB's, both split.
Epiphone Valve Junior
B-52 AT-412 Cabinet
Oh, and I have a Squier VM Jazz Bass too.
#13
Thank you so much. That really helps.

Well, since i can not do the binding, I dont know what kind of design i'm going to do now. Any ideas?

If i did the crackle paint, where would i get it, and how does it work?
Hello
#14
Quote by MXBoy11
Thank you so much. That really helps.

Well, since i can not do the binding, I dont know what kind of design i'm going to do now. Any ideas?

If i did the crackle paint, where would i get it, and how does it work?

Get it at any hardware store. Paint your base coat that you want to show up as the crackle (gold). Then paint some standard color over it (in this case, black). The black crackle paint shrivels up to make a crackling effect. Look it up on google. It looks cool. Then clearcoat the hell out of it.

Edit:
The inverse of this (white on green) is what the girl I know did. It looked amazing with the southern floral painting on top of it. Anyways, in this case, white is the base coat and green is the color of the crackle paint.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
Last edited by Chad48309 at Feb 24, 2008,
#15
That sounds like a sweet idea. I think I am going to give that a shot. Thanks
Hello