#1
I need some tips on making a room dedicated to playing loud music in.

Me and a few other guys want to jam, but everywhere we have tried we always get shutdown due to pissed off neighbors, and we dont have enough cash flow to rent a studio or practice room. So we decided to take a room, and try to muffle the sound that comes out of it as much as possible.

If anyone can help me pick out the right stuff to buy I would really appreciate it. (I'm a noob at acoustics.)
#2
the super easy and ghetto way to kinda isolate sound would be to put up carpets or a matress on the walls and/or ceilings. but be aware it won't take all the noise from coming out, it'll stop alot of the bass and some of the music but to full proof it. you'll need alot of foam, fiberglass, glue, and 1inch glass.
My Gear:
epiphone les paul cusom, Limited edition. evo dimarzio pick ups
Parker P-38
epiphone hummingbird
line 6 flextone
crate vtx 120

head full of ideas.
#3
This isn't a joke, but egg boxes stuck to the wall stop a lot of sound!! If you can get the big trays which I think are 12 eggs by 12 eggs and stick these to the wall the sound outside the room will be a lot less.
#4
One of my friends has a music room and he put blanket (or pillow? I don't remember) insulation up on the walls, real thick, like 4 sheets per wall.

It works surprisingly well. The weak points are the ceiling and floor, and it's also not completely soundproof, as people have heard us outside.
Main gear (For complete list, see profile):
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain-top
Basswood Telecaster, 2 single-sized HB's, both split.
Epiphone Valve Junior
B-52 AT-412 Cabinet
Oh, and I have a Squier VM Jazz Bass too.
#5
I dont really wanna ghetto rig it =P

I just really need help on picking the right stuff and how to install it. Just act like I'm a 5 year old kid putting together a model airplane.
#6
Quote by Mr E
This isn't a joke, but egg boxes stuck to the wall stop a lot of sound!! If you can get the big trays which I think are 12 eggs by 12 eggs and stick these to the wall the sound outside the room will be a lot less.


They'll cut down on reverb, but it won't really do anything to soundproof the room.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
If the room had windows, make sure they're thick, double-paned, with air space in between.

Use foam and insulation to cover up door/window cracks. And a lot of insulation all around, basically.

Exactly how loud are you planning to play? Is there more bass, or is it more high pitched?
#8
Remember, it's better to have 1 inch wall + 1 inch empty space + 1 inch wall than to have just a 3 inch wall. The rest I know is already covered.
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#9
Quote by Mr E
This isn't a joke, but egg boxes stuck to the wall stop a lot of sound!! If you can get the big trays which I think are 12 eggs by 12 eggs and stick these to the wall the sound outside the room will be a lot less.


It's BS. It's an acoustics solution, not sound proofing.
#10
we always get shutdown due to pissed off neighbors
Pissed off neighbours can't do anything where I live, unless they can hear us after 10pm.

Have you looked into the local rules/limits for noise pollution? If not, it would be a good idea to do so.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
Egg cartons are good for controlling reflections in the room, but that's not apparently what you are interested in. They'll do sweet f-all for soundproofing.

Soundproofing comes down to two things - mass and air. Also remember that - like the tin can and string telephone experiment you did when you were ten - that sound travels along solid surfaces as they are made to vibrate. Sound will travel across a solid surface until it reaches a dead end - an airspace.

Something with a lot of mass will stop sound. Egg cartons have practically NO mass.

I'm looking at doing my garage in the next couple of years. Here is roughly what I plan to do:

First, it is a concrete block structure with brick veneer. Very massive already. Problem - there is a window and a man door, and a vehicle door. All of those are the weak areas where sound will get out. If air gets out, sound will get out too.

First, frame the room to be with 2x4 studs about an inch inwards from the block wall. Make sure the studs don't touch (air!) the concrete block walls so that sound does not travel through the studs and into the walls. Also, depending on the floor in your garage, consider using a heavy rubber buffer to absorb vibrations that might travel through the studs towards the floor making it vibrate. Though if it is concrete, it is already pretty massive. Also consider.... will sound be able to travel along the beams in your ceiling towards the outside of the structure? Stop that too! Consider framing in a "false ceiling" - almost like a room within a room - so that there is an airspace and no actual contact with the beams above. Insulate with good insulation. Heavy drywall (mass!) over studs. Maybe consider a material (can't remember what it is called) that will keep the drywall from directly touching the studs (or through the drywall to the nail/screw, and then into the studs). That way, when the sound makes the drywall resonante, there will be a gap (remember air!) between that and the studs so the vibrations aren't passed onto the studs.

Make sure windows are double-glassed (mass!!) and well sealed. All the soundproofing construction in the world is money wasted if your window will let all the sound out anyways. (or the door, etc.)

Consider having a door to get into your practice space that you would walk through AFTER you walk into the garage. Make sure it seals really well and is of significant mass.

A crack that is 1 millimeter wide along the side of a door (about 2m and a bit) and a centimeter high along the bottom of the door (1m) would be the same as having an actual hole 5cmx6cm (about the size of a tennis ball) leading straight to the outside.

But wait... if you block everything up so no sound gets out, won't you run out of air? Yes! Next you have to think about how to get air in and out of your space. Without letting sound in and out.

You get the idea.... there is so much to it.

Soundproofing is expensive, and requires a lot of knowhow. Also consider that the more soundproof you want it, the more expensive and complicated it becomes.

Finally, nothing is totally soundproof. It comes down to how soundproof do you want it, at what cost, and at what effort.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Well I'm pretty much looking at something to throw/glue over the walls, floor and ceiling without having to do any other construction, and I need to know what exactly would work the best for muffling the sound to a suitable volume for the neighbors/houseguests when we are jamming late at night.

We play with our amps about halfway up, and we have decent amps. The drums are not muffled what-so-ever. The bass is pretty loud as well.
#13
Quote by axemanchris

Soundproofing is expensive, and requires a lot of knowhow. Also consider that the more soundproof you want it, the more expensive and complicated it becomes.

Finally, nothing is totally soundproof. It comes down to how soundproof do you want it, at what cost, and at what effort.


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
you thought of like, not playing so late or so loud? over here in the bay area my band or just I play as loud as i want (without it being illegal) from about 11am to 9pm, a strict cutoff time at 9. or you could go and practice at your drummers house or rotate at which house you play at like 1 week be the bassists house the next your guitarist, ect.ect.
My Gear:
epiphone les paul cusom, Limited edition. evo dimarzio pick ups
Parker P-38
epiphone hummingbird
line 6 flextone
crate vtx 120

head full of ideas.
#16
We really need to stay in one spot, and be courteous to our neighbors, so far I've seen that buiding a room within a room is really the only way =(
#17
Quote by axemanchris
Egg cartons are good for controlling reflections in the room, but that's not apparently what you are interested in. They'll do sweet f-all for soundproofing.

Soundproofing comes down to two things - mass and air. Also remember that - like the tin can and string telephone experiment you did when you were ten - that sound travels along solid surfaces as they are made to vibrate. Sound will travel across a solid surface until it reaches a dead end - an airspace.

Something with a lot of mass will stop sound. Egg cartons have practically NO mass.

I'm looking at doing my garage in the next couple of years. Here is roughly what I plan to do:

First, it is a concrete block structure with brick veneer. Very massive already. Problem - there is a window and a man door, and a vehicle door. All of those are the weak areas where sound will get out. If air gets out, sound will get out too.

First, frame the room to be with 2x4 studs about an inch inwards from the block wall. Make sure the studs don't touch (air!) the concrete block walls so that sound does not travel through the studs and into the walls. Also, depending on the floor in your garage, consider using a heavy rubber buffer to absorb vibrations that might travel through the studs towards the floor making it vibrate. Though if it is concrete, it is already pretty massive. Also consider.... will sound be able to travel along the beams in your ceiling towards the outside of the structure? Stop that too! Consider framing in a "false ceiling" - almost like a room within a room - so that there is an airspace and no actual contact with the beams above. Insulate with good insulation. Heavy drywall (mass!) over studs. Maybe consider a material (can't remember what it is called) that will keep the drywall from directly touching the studs (or through the drywall to the nail/screw, and then into the studs). That way, when the sound makes the drywall resonante, there will be a gap (remember air!) between that and the studs so the vibrations aren't passed onto the studs.

Make sure windows are double-glassed (mass!!) and well sealed. All the soundproofing construction in the world is money wasted if your window will let all the sound out anyways. (or the door, etc.)

Consider having a door to get into your practice space that you would walk through AFTER you walk into the garage. Make sure it seals really well and is of significant mass.

A crack that is 1 millimeter wide along the side of a door (about 2m and a bit) and a centimeter high along the bottom of the door (1m) would be the same as having an actual hole 5cmx6cm (about the size of a tennis ball) leading straight to the outside.

But wait... if you block everything up so no sound gets out, won't you run out of air? Yes! Next you have to think about how to get air in and out of your space. Without letting sound in and out.

You get the idea.... there is so much to it.

Soundproofing is expensive, and requires a lot of knowhow. Also consider that the more soundproof you want it, the more expensive and complicated it becomes.

Finally, nothing is totally soundproof. It comes down to how soundproof do you want it, at what cost, and at what effort.

CT

Thread over. Post=win
#18
Quote by Mustard_Man
well the knowhow part is why im here. i dontknowhow


I gathered from your post that you're looking for something cheap and easy. I'm providing you with the knowledge that there is no cheap and easy.

You can gain some small advantages with heavy blankets, mattresses (both massive and absorbent and can be cheap, but not pretty), but if you've got a full drum kit and if you have half decent amps at half volume (which we all know isn't really half volume - the difference in volume from 5-10 is maybe only a quarter to a third of what it is from 1-5), I bet you're pretty friggin loud. That's not a criticism. Rock bands that match that description usually just are.

Your best bets are turning down, finding other places and times to practice, etc. Or be prepared to do a TON of research, spend a good whack of cash (no new guitars or pedals for a while!), and put in a lot of time and effort to actually do some decent soundproofing.

Also, depending on where your room is, soundproofing might not even be a realistic or viable option. Consider if you are in a room in an attic. You won't have much room to separate your music room ceiling from the actual "constructed" attic ceiling to prevent sound from traveling across the room joists to the outside. But then there is the matter of separating the music room FLOOR from the actual constructed floor so that sound doesn't travel along the floor, across the floor joists and to the rest of the house and the out side of the structure. That would be HUGE money, and a MAJOR loss of space. Nobody in their right mind would invest in that.

As far as laws go, here in Hamilton, Ontario, rock bands are pretty hard to do legally. We got a letter from Hamilton Noise Control way back when threatening us with a $2000 fine if we practiced there again. The police were out front earlier and told us to turn down. We called City Hall to protest it, saying that it was a Sunday afternoon, and that since it was between 6 am and 11 pm, that we thought we could make pretty much as much noise as we wanted. We used lawnmowers and things like that as examples of noise that other people make and are legally allowed to get away with. The kicker was that that law did not apply to sounds that are "electronically generated." Now, we all know that you don't even hear the guitars until you're on the front porch, but you'll hear the snare drum from a block away. We ran with the ridiculous and asked, "So we can't jam here on a sunday afternoon with our electric guitars, but we could set up on a Tuesday night on his front yard with the drum kit and some acoustic guitars and wail away till our hearts were content and nobody could say screw all until 11:00, because the sounds aren't electronically generated?" Answer, "You would certainly be a nuissance to your neighbours, and it might affect any positive relationships you might have with some of them, but technically, you're basically right." Hmph. Go figure.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.