#1
Hey dudes ive been playing guitar for a while and ive learnt lots of stuff, but ive realised the way ive learnt is different to most other peoples

so in a key how do you know what chords are in that key, is it something to do with the scale your using cause ive seen songs that look like they're using chords from different scales, can you mix and match scales with a chord progression and when soloing??? ty for the help dudes
#2
i would also liek to this. i think it has to do with scales, major scales and there relitive minor stuff like that. but there is also something "if it sounds goo it sounds good" who cares if it doesn't go with the scale or whatever.
#4
well u want to use chords that involve the notes in that key
so if a key sharpens the G note, don't use a G chord, it'll sound wrong, go with a G#...thats a fairly basic example, but im drunk.
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#5
ok dudes ive looked at your replies but like in the key of A major for example im pretty sure ive seen the G major being used, this doesnt match the A mjor scale unless there's some other wierd scale or summin being used?? any more help on the subject????????
#7
Quote by branny1982
G major is not in the A major Scale.

The song could be in D major, which has both G and A major chords.

D major-
D E F# G A B C#

Any chords using those notes can be played in the key of D.

Dmaj
Emin
F#min
Gmaj
Amaj
Bmin
C#dim


Chord progressions aren't always in one key. Using G (bVII) in the key of A is very common.
#9
Quote by werty22
Chord progressions aren't always in one key. Using G (bVII) in the key of A is very common.


Chord progressions also aren't always the first chord in a song, as so many people mistake it for.
#10
so how does using the G in the key of A work, i know you can use it with the A minor scale but im pretty damn sure ive seen chords from a mixture of (for example A) scales, look at brain stew by green day it uses:
A
G
F#
F
E (all tuned down half a step)

is this based on some sorta scale i havnt realised? ty dudes for your help so far
#11
Quote by synysterA7Xrule
so how does using the G in the key of A work, i know you can use it with the A minor scale but im pretty damn sure ive seen chords from a mixture of (for example A) scales, look at brain stew by green day it uses:
A
G
F#
F
E (all tuned down half a step)

is this based on some sorta scale i havnt realised? ty dudes for your help so far

No, it's not based on any different scale. As I said before, notes aren't always in one key. In Brain Stew, the chords just descend by a whole or half step while the melody is made up of chord tones and passing tones loosely based on the major scale. I'm pretty sure Billie Joe Armstrong didn't have a particular scale in mind when he wrote it.
#12
Quote by werty22
No, it's not based on any different scale. As I said before, notes aren't always in one key. In Brain Stew, the chords just descend by a whole or half step while the melody is made up of chord tones and passing tones loosely based on the major scale. I'm pretty sure Billie Joe Armstrong didn't have a particular scale in mind when he wrote it.


Don't forget that many of those chords might be power chords, and thus, they all could fit into a single key.
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#13
Quote by seedmole
Don't forget that many of those chords might be power chords, and thus, they all could fit into a single key.

How could they be in the same key? There's an E, an F, an F#, and a G.
#14
Ah so when you write a melody, you don't need a particular scale, argh this is all getting too much, but what if you went to do a solo, what would you do then????
#15
Quote by werty22
How could they be in the same key? There's an E, an F, an F#, and a G.


haha, my bad

that's what i get for not actually reading what they wrote, lol
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#16
I think i've partially solved my problem, the mixolodian scale uses the same notes as the major scale but it flattens the 7th so in the key of a major you could use g major